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Team Leader

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By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
A former team leader of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning testified Tuesday that she told superiors on several occasions that Manning should not be allowed to handle classified information or be sent to Iraq, but her warnings apparently went unheeded. Manning, then an intelligence analyst, deployed with his unit to a base south of Baghdad, where Army prosecutors allege he gave hundreds of thousands of classified documents to the anti-secrecy organization WikiLeaks in one of the largest security breaches in U.S. history.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Sometimes, I get a little tired of extolling the Ravens front office for its uncanny ability to identify talent, but it's hard not to do that whenever Joe Flacco steps to the microphone for one of his podium sessions at the Under Armour Performance Center. The guy was a small-school wunderkind with a big body and a great football IQ, but somebody was smart enough to foresee that he could be one of the winningest and toughest quarterbacks in the NFL. That toughness showed up early when he played through that horrible thigh bruise early in his pro career, and it has shown up throughout this season while he takes a weekly pounding behind the Ravens' struggling O-line.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Richard P. Healy, an environmental engineer whose career with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency spanned more than three decades, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Hamilton resident was 61. "Rich was a wonderful guy and a team leader for our beach team. He has been in that position since 2002, which oversees grants to coastal Great Lakes states, which helps them with beach monitoring and advising about contamination such as sewage," said John B. Wathen, who is the assistant chief of the EPA's Fish, Shellfish, Beaches and Outreach Branch.
NEWS
By Neal Lavon | June 1, 2001
TAKOMA PARK -- I've always thought parents knew best when it came to their children's education. But I'm ready to alter that view based on some parents' responses to Montgomery County's latest school cheating scandal. School officials say math teachers at Silver Spring International Middle School (SSI) obtained advance copies of the math portion of a nationwide test given in Maryland called the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (CTBS). Investigators add that teachers used the copies to prepare review lessons and two of them gave students the actual test questions for homework in advance of the exam.
NEWS
By Bill Free | November 5, 2006
Senior outside hitter Jaime Schaller played a major role in Harford Christian School's march to a 13-2 record this season, coming through with significant kills and serving consistently well. Schaller said her teammates were so team-oriented that they stopped keeping individual statistics halfway through the season and concentrated on the Maryland Association of Christian Schools tournament championship; the team finished third. What was your responsibility as a three-year starter and team leader?
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Richard P. Healy, an environmental engineer whose career with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency spanned more than three decades, died Saturday of esophageal cancer at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Hamilton resident was 61. "Rich was a wonderful guy and a team leader for our beach team. He has been in that position since 2002, which oversees grants to coastal Great Lakes states, which helps them with beach monitoring and advising about contamination such as sewage," said John B. Wathen, who is the assistant chief of the EPA's Fish, Shellfish, Beaches and Outreach Branch.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
Thank you for your wonderful piece on the angels who take care of our disabled population ( "Minimum wage debate ignores crucial group," Jan. 15). I am the mother of a 21-year-old, profoundly autistic young man who attends the day program at the League for People with Disabilities. The people who work with him every day are incredible and display a rare compassion and patience not seen in most workplaces. I work for the federal government and have yet to encounter anyone with the compassion that is shown by any of the members of the team who work with my son. When you speak of bodily risk, just this week, my son inadvertently injured the leader of his team.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
By BILL FREE | October 29, 2006
The 6-foot-5, 280-pound senior offensive tackle has been given a huge share of the credit for the Panthers' turnaround from last season, when the team averaged only five points a game and was 2-8. The Panthers are scoring 23 points a game and have already surpassed last year's win total with a 3-4 record. How do you learn to live with very little recognition as an offensive lineman? I know the whole team, all the linemen and everything, is working together, and we have a good running back, Jeremy Ritz, so all we have to do is make the blocks, and he does his thing.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
The relationship that has persisted for over a decade was in danger of coming to an end. However, the more the Ravens and Terrell Suggs pondered their options this offseason, they kept coming back to the same conclusion. Suggs and the Ravens still needed each other. The Ravens couldn't afford to lose another team leader and defensive standout. Suggs, 31, would have options either way, but none of them appealed to him more than his current situation. The official compromise came Monday in the form of a four-year, $28.5 million contract extension that gave both sides exactly what they wanted and checked off one of the major items on the Ravens' offseason to-do list.
NEWS
January 21, 2014
Thank you for your wonderful piece on the angels who take care of our disabled population ( "Minimum wage debate ignores crucial group," Jan. 15). I am the mother of a 21-year-old, profoundly autistic young man who attends the day program at the League for People with Disabilities. The people who work with him every day are incredible and display a rare compassion and patience not seen in most workplaces. I work for the federal government and have yet to encounter anyone with the compassion that is shown by any of the members of the team who work with my son. When you speak of bodily risk, just this week, my son inadvertently injured the leader of his team.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Jeremiah Johnson sensed something was wrong with his foot, but he wasn't ready to process the signals his body was sending. After sweating with his teammates through weeks of spring practices and summer training camp, it seemed too sudden - too cruel and random - for Maryland's starting cornerback to be injured in the first game of the season on a routine special-teams play. The redshirt junior was blocking for kick returner Stefon Diggs against Florida International on Aug. 31 when his left foot buckled and one of his toes was pushed backward at an awkward angle.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
Navy coach Ken Niumatalolo calls starting middle linebacker Cody Peterson "soft spoken. " Inside linebackers coach Steve Johns refers to the senior as "quiet. " Peterson describes himself as "introverted. " Senior wide receiver Matt Aiken paints a different picture of his teammate and co-captain. "He's got a tough-guy mentality, and he definitely brings that every day to practice," Aiken said last week. "He comes ready to play every day, just 100 percent every practice. Even yesterday, he was getting into a fight at practice with one of our younger guys.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Sometimes, I get a little tired of extolling the Ravens front office for its uncanny ability to identify talent, but it's hard not to do that whenever Joe Flacco steps to the microphone for one of his podium sessions at the Under Armour Performance Center. The guy was a small-school wunderkind with a big body and a great football IQ, but somebody was smart enough to foresee that he could be one of the winningest and toughest quarterbacks in the NFL. That toughness showed up early when he played through that horrible thigh bruise early in his pro career, and it has shown up throughout this season while he takes a weekly pounding behind the Ravens' struggling O-line.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
With the Class 2A playoffs quickly approaching, Randallstown senior guard Ahmaad Wilson looks to lead the Rams on an extended postseason run. Having reached the state semifinals while playing at Owings Mills as a sophomore in 2011, Wilson knows what it takes to get to Comcast Center. He's excited about the possibility of a return trip to College Park with No. 11 Randallstown. Wilson fit in immediately after transferring to the school this year. A team leader, he's averaging 16.0 points, 3.0 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 2.5 steals for the Rams.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
With the Class 2A playoffs quickly approaching, Randallstown senior guard Ahmaad Wilson looks to lead the Rams on an extended postseason run. Having reached the state semifinals while playing at Owings Mills as a sophomore in 2011, Wilson knows what it takes to get to Comcast Center. He's excited about the possibility of a return trip to College Park with No. 11 Randallstown. Wilson fit in immediately after transferring to the school this year. A team leader, he's averaging 16.0 points, 3.0 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 2.5 steals for the Rams.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2007
When Annapolis senior guard Lateef Williams talks about the state basketball tournament experience from his sophomore year, the story begins on the night before and extends to the following day all the way to tip-off. Sleep was replaced with a case of nerves and excitement. The following school day dragged, but the hallways were buzzing with anticipation. And the locker room at the Comcast Center was filled with emotion before it was time to take the floor. "It was one of the best feelings in the world for me - just a real good feeling," Williams said.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2012
As the Ravens spent their week preparing for another vital showdown against the arch-rival Pittsburgh Steelers, the words and images from Owings Mills could have come from any recent season. There was linebacker Terrell Suggs, showing off his tattooed arms in defiance of the 40-degree chill as he mused over the infinite "alley fight" between Ravens and Steelers. There was running back Ray Rice, speaking through his gentle grin of how it's time to don "big boy pants" for the tough games ahead.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and For The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Sara Carter and Erin Causey met during their freshman year at Hereford. The two girls discovered they had a number of similarities and eventually became best friends. Both girls loved running, and they were very good, especially in cross country. Carter finished second in the Class 3A state championship race last year while Causey was fifth as Hereford dominated the rest of field to win a second consecutive team title. Now juniors, Carter and Causey are team captains this season as they aim to bring a third straight state championship to the Baltimore County school.
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