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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | August 17, 2007
Motivation is a personal thing. Some people get involved in triathlons and marathons because they want to look or feel better, others because they can't resist the challenge, and still others because they enjoy training with a group. For the Riesz family of Ellicott City, two of whose members will be participating in Sunday's Iron Girl triathlon, the catalyst was cancer. In the spring of 1999, Charlie Riesz was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma, and given a 50-50 chance of survival.
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SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | January 6, 2012
  At the ungodly hour of 5:30 this morning, they step off the Walt Disney World Half Marathon in Orlando: the lean, serious speedsters and the dedicated plodders and the fat guys in Mickey Mouse ears just hoping to make it to the first water stop. Among them will be 28-year-old Georgia Cleland, a small woman from Ruxton with a ready smile. And you can bet she'll be smiling today, because hers might be the best story in the entire field, a three-hankie tale of a family's love and a father's crazy idea that raised millions for cancer research and spawned the whole running-for-a-cause movement.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 6, 2008
Bruce Cleland's 5-year-old daughter had just completed two years of treatment for leukemia when he decided to raise a little money to help others affected by the disease. He asked some friends in New York to train for a marathon with him and collect some pledges from others. The response overwhelmed them: About three dozen people brought in $320,000. That was 1988. Now, those in Cleland's training and fundraising program are easy to spot in the nation's biggest running and biking races.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | October 6, 2008
Bruce Cleland's 5-year-old daughter had just completed two years of treatment for leukemia when he decided to raise a little money to help others affected by the disease. He asked some friends in New York to train for a marathon with him and collect some pledges from others. The response overwhelmed them: About three dozen people brought in $320,000. That was 1988. Now, those in Cleland's training and fundraising program are easy to spot in the nation's biggest running and biking races.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | May 2, 2008
As she pressed the fingertips of her left hand to the small valley of flesh above her right collarbone, Donna Ebaugh recalled "the lump." A physician discovered a small mass there during a routine precamp checkup when the 16-year-old was a rising high school senior but said it wasn't anything to worry about. She attended cheerleading camp as planned, but the lump grew quickly during her stay and Ebaugh -- then Donna Davis of Babson Park, Fla. -- became frightened. A friend had recently been diagnosed with brain cancer; could she have cancer, too?
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and By Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
The Baltimore Marathon Festival will be another run for the money for Cliff Walzer. He's about three decades past his athletic prime, so cash prizes aren't what send Walzer out the door at 5 a.m. to work out. He is among the hundreds of men and women who will run the Comcast Baltimore Marathon for a charity. Walzer's cause is personal, because he's a cancer survivor. A 49-year-old oral surgeon from Annapolis, Walzer is among the 125 members of the Baltimore chapter of Team in Training who will tour the city in running shoes Saturday.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2002
WHEN YOU MEET 12-year-old Kati Fisher, you discover a studious seventh-grader who loves school and maintains a 4.0 grade point average. It's an amazing accomplishment for someone who has been fighting leukemia for two years, who has undergone more than 100 weeks of chemotherapy, 13 spinal taps, four bone marrow aspirations and radiation treatment. Along the way, she got some help from Team in Training, a sports endurance training program that raises money for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | May 18, 2007
Maggie Moraw, 26, has been training for Sunday's Columbia Triathlon for months. Nearly every day - sometimes at 5:30 in the morning, sometimes in the evenings - she runs, bicycles or swims with other members of Team in Training, an organization that helps athletes prepare for competitions while raising money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The group provides unstinting support and encouragement, but during particularly grueling workouts, Moraw looks to her mother, Patricia Steimle, for inspiration.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2005
For years, in their own ways, Justin Knight and Kellie Johnson have suffered because of leukemia. And for years, both have worked to raise money for research and patient services. Now, for the first time, Justin, an eighth-grader at the Norbel School in Elkridge, and Johnson, a speech language pathologist there, are joining forces to support the Team in Training -- an arm of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society that supports fundraising and training for marathons. Johnson, whose father died of the disease in 2003, will run the Walt Disney World Marathon in Orlando, Fla., on Jan. 8 as part of Team in Training.
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK and ALIA MALIK,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
Kati Fisher's one wish started small. The 11-year-old girl from Glen Burnie asked the Make-A-Wish Foundation to send her to the 2001 Rock 'n' Roll Marathon in San Diego, where she could watch a group from the Annapolis area run to raise money for people like her - diagnosed with leukemia. After that, Kati's dreams were bigger than just watching the race. She decided she wanted to run it, all 26.2 miles, one day. "I can do this," she told her father. She even set a date: the San Diego Rock 'n' Roll Marathon on June 4, 2006.
NEWS
By Alex Plimack and Alex Plimack,alex.plimack@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
Kelly Blassingame used to be a cheerleader but never really considered herself to be much of an athlete. That was until three years ago, when she was watching a marathon in Alaska. "I said, 'I can do that!' " she said. After returning home to Hanover, Pa., she began training. She focused on walking because of her bad knees, logging about two miles three days a week and taking longer walks on the weekend. She's now finished two marathons, including the Walt Disney World Marathon in January, which she finished in seven hours and two minutes.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | May 2, 2008
As she pressed the fingertips of her left hand to the small valley of flesh above her right collarbone, Donna Ebaugh recalled "the lump." A physician discovered a small mass there during a routine precamp checkup when the 16-year-old was a rising high school senior but said it wasn't anything to worry about. She attended cheerleading camp as planned, but the lump grew quickly during her stay and Ebaugh -- then Donna Davis of Babson Park, Fla. -- became frightened. A friend had recently been diagnosed with brain cancer; could she have cancer, too?
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | August 19, 2007
After a gnawing pain in her left arm brought her to the doctor last year, Carlie Marvel, then 12, learned she had a rare, life-threatening form of leukemia. The cancer cells had eaten away nearly half of the bones in her upper left arm. The Eastern Shore girl spent two months at Johns Hopkins Hospital undergoing chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant from her younger sister. Yesterday at the Hard Rock Cafe in Baltimore, a healthy 13-year-old Carlie and her mother, Caryn Marvel of Trappe in Talbot County, shared their story with about 100 cancer patients, survivors, family members and friends of the Maryland Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | August 17, 2007
Motivation is a personal thing. Some people get involved in triathlons and marathons because they want to look or feel better, others because they can't resist the challenge, and still others because they enjoy training with a group. For the Riesz family of Ellicott City, two of whose members will be participating in Sunday's Iron Girl triathlon, the catalyst was cancer. In the spring of 1999, Charlie Riesz was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and given a 50-50 chance of survival.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | May 18, 2007
Maggie Moraw, 26, has been training for Sunday's Columbia Triathlon for months. Nearly every day - sometimes at 5:30 in the morning, sometimes in the evenings - she runs, bicycles or swims with other members of Team in Training, an organization that helps athletes prepare for competitions while raising money for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. The group provides unstinting support and encouragement, but during particularly grueling workouts, Moraw looks to her mother, Patricia Steimle, for inspiration.
NEWS
By ALIA MALIK and ALIA MALIK,SUN REPORTER | June 23, 2006
Kati Fisher's one wish started small. The 11-year-old girl from Glen Burnie asked the Make-A-Wish Foundation to send her to the 2001 Rock 'n' Roll Marathon in San Diego, where she could watch a group from the Annapolis area run to raise money for people like her - diagnosed with leukemia. After that, Kati's dreams were bigger than just watching the race. She decided she wanted to run it, all 26.2 miles, one day. "I can do this," she told her father. She even set a date: the San Diego Rock 'n' Roll Marathon on June 4, 2006.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | August 19, 2007
After a gnawing pain in her left arm brought her to the doctor last year, Carlie Marvel, then 12, learned she had a rare, life-threatening form of leukemia. The cancer cells had eaten away nearly half of the bones in her upper left arm. The Eastern Shore girl spent two months at Johns Hopkins Hospital undergoing chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant from her younger sister. Yesterday at the Hard Rock Cafe in Baltimore, a healthy 13-year-old Carlie and her mother, Caryn Marvel of Trappe in Talbot County, shared their story with about 100 cancer patients, survivors, family members and friends of the Maryland Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.
NEWS
By MARY BETH REGAN and MARY BETH REGAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2006
Every year I hear of people signing up for programs to train for a marathon. Do you know anything about these programs? How far do you have to be running to start? If you are thinking about the Under Armour Baltimore Marathon in the fall, you are smart to begin training now. Last weekend, I caught up with Jim Adams, longtime Baltimore runner and owner of the Falls Road Running Store. Adams has coordinated the Baltimore Marathon's training programs for the past few years. The Baltimore Running Coalition, a nonprofit group of runners and walkers, will sponsor a handful of training programs again this year, Adams says.
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