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By New York Times News Service | December 23, 1990
MAE SAM LAEP, Thailand -- On the steep banks of the Salween River, which forms the border with Myanmar (formerly Burma), this small Thai town is having something of a timber boom.All around it the world's last great stand of teak forest is being ravaged to help finance Myanmar's military government and its long border war against ethnic insurgents.Every day now in the dry season, when the muddy roads through the mountains are more easily passable,rafts of teak logs come floating down the river.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Unless a 10-year resident or a frequent patron of the shops and night life in historic Fells Point, a visitor to Bond Street could not help but notice a group of beautifully restored, brick townhomes lined up at the edge of the cobblestones. Imagine the surprise, then, to learn they were built exclusively by Baltimore developers, Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse less than eight years ago. The colonial-like exteriors of each of the three-story atrium-style townhouses belie the newness of construction in the meticulous architectural details they bear.
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NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | June 18, 2000
Kmart shoppers light up the room Blue-light specials aren't the only lighting news at Kmart. The discount department store chain has recently jazzed up its collections of lamps and shades. "Our lamp business is up," says spokeswoman Laura Mahle, "and our customers are looking for on-trend merchandise and a strong selection." That translates to everything from lava lamps for retro-loving teens to hand-painted Baroque torchieres. The handsome Mission-style lamps pictured, which are new this month at Kmart, come in two sizes, table and floor ($34.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
What began four years ago as an idea for a small weekend retreat soon morphed into plans for a full-time, lodge-style homestead where Kip Fulks, one of the founding partners in Under Armour sports apparel, and his wife, Beth, could find permanent refuge. "We wanted to build a house where we could grow old together," said Kip Fulks, the 39-year-old senior vice president of outdoor and innovation for Under Armour. "[So] we had to build a home that would be exciting to wake up to every day. " Susan Major, owner of the Hestia Design Group in Columbia, was a key player in the house's story from the very beginning, as the Fulks admired her work and took her on board as decorator and adviser.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | March 27, 1994
Of tables, fables and the artist's craftIf you make just $47 in your first craft show, you probably shouldn't quit your day job.But Judith Rand did just that, giving up a job as a psychology professor to become a full-time artisan, sculpting fancifulfurniture and mirrors from ordinary planks of cherry, teak and birch.Even now, 14 years after quitting Bowie State University, the 51-year-old Ms. Rand can't quite explain how she became a woodworker. One day, she simply bought some tools at Sears, picked up a how-to book and made herself a dining room table.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | June 14, 1992
The gardening boom of the late 1980s has led to an enhanced appreciation of the outdoors. We're sitting out more, in "rooms" such as porches, patios, terraces and decks, and we're increasingly fussy about how visually inviting -- indeed, how livable -- they are."People today want outdoor living spaces that feel the same way they do inside," says Robert Currey of Gardener's Source, a manufacturer of casual furniture in Atlanta.In no area do we see this more than in furnishings. Today's options in casual furniture reflect a range in design looks from rustic log cabin to frilly Victorian ironwork to neoclassic shapes to streamlined contemporary.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
Missy Connolly loves to entertain, and she wanted her new patio and its al fresco dining space to have the look and feel of the Hamptons. But she only had a Bethany Beach budget. So the Baltimore County interior designer found the wrought-iron patio furniture she wanted at a garage sale and scooped it up for a couple of hundred dollars. She had her husband hammer together an oversized dining table from rescued wood and covered its roughness with a bright tablecloth.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2005
On Hill Street in Baltimore's Otterbein neighborhood, red brick houses with wooden shutters and rooftop gables sit amid 19th-century-like street lamps. Small, grassy areas and benches add to a step-back-in-time ambience. But step out of the enclave and you find yourself in the heart of Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Cindi Seitz, a 32-year-old physical therapist, and her husband, Chad, a 34-year-old engineer, bought a home on Hill Street in May 2003, shortly after their marriage. "This house literally fell into our laps," Cindi Seitz said.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2011
Unless a 10-year resident or a frequent patron of the shops and night life in historic Fells Point, a visitor to Bond Street could not help but notice a group of beautifully restored, brick townhomes lined up at the edge of the cobblestones. Imagine the surprise, then, to learn they were built exclusively by Baltimore developers, Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse less than eight years ago. The colonial-like exteriors of each of the three-story atrium-style townhouses belie the newness of construction in the meticulous architectural details they bear.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
What began four years ago as an idea for a small weekend retreat soon morphed into plans for a full-time, lodge-style homestead where Kip Fulks, one of the founding partners in Under Armour sports apparel, and his wife, Beth, could find permanent refuge. "We wanted to build a house where we could grow old together," said Kip Fulks, the 39-year-old senior vice president of outdoor and innovation for Under Armour. "[So] we had to build a home that would be exciting to wake up to every day. " Susan Major, owner of the Hestia Design Group in Columbia, was a key player in the house's story from the very beginning, as the Fulks admired her work and took her on board as decorator and adviser.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
Missy Connolly loves to entertain, and she wanted her new patio and its al fresco dining space to have the look and feel of the Hamptons. But she only had a Bethany Beach budget. So the Baltimore County interior designer found the wrought-iron patio furniture she wanted at a garage sale and scooped it up for a couple of hundred dollars. She had her husband hammer together an oversized dining table from rescued wood and covered its roughness with a bright tablecloth.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 18, 2007
I like the look of teak furniture and teak flooring, but it seems I've overdone a good thing in my dining room. Not even the pale yellow walls prevent the space from looking dark and dull. Keeping my modest budget in mind, can you suggest how I might add some spark to this setting? What your dining room needs is more color and contrast. And both can be introduced, without great expense, by means of paint, fabrics and accessories. Consider painting over those pale yellow walls with a warm color such as melon or a reddish-orange.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2005
On Hill Street in Baltimore's Otterbein neighborhood, red brick houses with wooden shutters and rooftop gables sit amid 19th-century-like street lamps. Small, grassy areas and benches add to a step-back-in-time ambience. But step out of the enclave and you find yourself in the heart of Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Cindi Seitz, a 32-year-old physical therapist, and her husband, Chad, a 34-year-old engineer, bought a home on Hill Street in May 2003, shortly after their marriage. "This house literally fell into our laps," Cindi Seitz said.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | June 18, 2000
Kmart shoppers light up the room Blue-light specials aren't the only lighting news at Kmart. The discount department store chain has recently jazzed up its collections of lamps and shades. "Our lamp business is up," says spokeswoman Laura Mahle, "and our customers are looking for on-trend merchandise and a strong selection." That translates to everything from lava lamps for retro-loving teens to hand-painted Baroque torchieres. The handsome Mission-style lamps pictured, which are new this month at Kmart, come in two sizes, table and floor ($34.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | October 30, 1994
Q: I inherited a teakwood stand. It is 25 inches high, and the top is 11 inches in diameter. The top has a pink marble inset. A paper label on the underside has the words "Fau & Hing -- Made in China."What is its approximate worth?A: Carved teakwood stands were made in China for export in the early 1900s. They are generally seen in antiques shops in the $200 to $300 range, depending on the condition.Q: I have a porcelain creamer and sugar bowl that are at least 70 years old. They were made in Japan and decorated with multicolored flowers against a white background and trimmed in orange.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | March 27, 1994
Of tables, fables and the artist's craftIf you make just $47 in your first craft show, you probably shouldn't quit your day job.But Judith Rand did just that, giving up a job as a psychology professor to become a full-time artisan, sculpting fancifulfurniture and mirrors from ordinary planks of cherry, teak and birch.Even now, 14 years after quitting Bowie State University, the 51-year-old Ms. Rand can't quite explain how she became a woodworker. One day, she simply bought some tools at Sears, picked up a how-to book and made herself a dining room table.
FEATURES
By Anne McCollam and Anne McCollam,Copley News Service | October 30, 1994
Q: I inherited a teakwood stand. It is 25 inches high, and the top is 11 inches in diameter. The top has a pink marble inset. A paper label on the underside has the words "Fau & Hing -- Made in China."What is its approximate worth?A: Carved teakwood stands were made in China for export in the early 1900s. They are generally seen in antiques shops in the $200 to $300 range, depending on the condition.Q: I have a porcelain creamer and sugar bowl that are at least 70 years old. They were made in Japan and decorated with multicolored flowers against a white background and trimmed in orange.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 18, 2007
I like the look of teak furniture and teak flooring, but it seems I've overdone a good thing in my dining room. Not even the pale yellow walls prevent the space from looking dark and dull. Keeping my modest budget in mind, can you suggest how I might add some spark to this setting? What your dining room needs is more color and contrast. And both can be introduced, without great expense, by means of paint, fabrics and accessories. Consider painting over those pale yellow walls with a warm color such as melon or a reddish-orange.
FEATURES
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | June 14, 1992
The gardening boom of the late 1980s has led to an enhanced appreciation of the outdoors. We're sitting out more, in "rooms" such as porches, patios, terraces and decks, and we're increasingly fussy about how visually inviting -- indeed, how livable -- they are."People today want outdoor living spaces that feel the same way they do inside," says Robert Currey of Gardener's Source, a manufacturer of casual furniture in Atlanta.In no area do we see this more than in furnishings. Today's options in casual furniture reflect a range in design looks from rustic log cabin to frilly Victorian ironwork to neoclassic shapes to streamlined contemporary.
FEATURES
By John Madson and John Madson,Universal Press Syndicate | November 24, 1991
Mark Twain never cared much for the blue Ohio.He was a true, mud-blooded Mississippi riverman, saying that Ohio River water was just too clear to be healthy, while muddy Mississippi River water was so nutritious that a man drinking it "could grow corn in his stomach if he wanted to."Well, Twain knew rivers and wrote truly. But the Ohio deserved better. Even without a rich cargo of mud, it's nourishing enough -- a jade-colored feast for the eyes with as much history as you care to digest.For years I've been too beguiled by the Missouri and upper Mississippi rivers to spend time on the Ohio.
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