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By Gail M. Parker | March 14, 1997
YOUR MARCH 1 editorial, "Too many special ed students," says a great deal about the plight of our schools.Most of Baltimore's elementary teachers have been trained in only one method of teaching reading, "whole language," and the curriculum is designed around that method. Children who have a learning style not suited to the "whole language" method are destined for failure in school and often, as a result, in life.There are many school systems throughout the United States that train regular classroom teachers in three methods of teaching reading -- "whole language," "phonics" and a multi-sensory method for those learners who need that more structured approach.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2012
Harriett Ann Colder, a reading specialist who established a remedial education company that helped students with English, math and reading, died Tuesdayof multiple organ failure at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 74. The former Harriett Ann Orth, who went by Ann, was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Towson High School in 1955, she earned her bachelor's degree from what is now Towson University in 1959. In the early 1960s, she earned a master's degree in remedial reading and diagnosis of learning disabilities from Loyola College of Maryland.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN RAPP and SUSAN RAPP,VILLAGE READING CENTER | October 20, 1999
In the past several decades, the pendulum in education has swung from one reading approach to another, but the war between phonics and whole language is no longer waged with as much vigor as it once was. Researchers and educators are searching for a balance between the methods of the past and the present evidence about how children learn. Margaret Mooney, author of the book "Developing Lifelong Readers," writes, "The best approach to teaching reading is a combination of approaches. No single approach is sufficient for any child, nor is any predetermined combination of approaches."
NEWS
August 19, 2007
The Carroll County Board of Education will hold an administrative meeting at 4 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices at 125 N. Court St., Westminster. The regular meeting agenda is posted at www.carrollk12.org. Meetings will be broadcast on CETV, Channel 21 on Comcast cable TV and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and the following Thursday and 9 a.m. Saturday. Information: 410-751-3020. Comcast donates supplies to school Robert Moton Elementary School has been selected as the recipient of the Comcast CARES Back to School Drive.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 15, 1999
LOUISA C. MOATS HAS heard the heresy so many times she's sick of it: Teaching reading is easier than teaching mathematics or science because most children develop the skill naturally and easily, the way they learn to speak.She begs -- passionately -- to disagree, and at the request of the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), she has produced a little primer for anyone interested in the fundamental skill on which all education depends. Moats' booklet is called "Teaching Reading IS Rocket Science."
FEATURES
June 14, 1998
Does reading jargon have your head buzzing? Here is a glossary of the current "buzz" words in reading:* Basal readers: Books of gradually increasing difficulty based on increasingly complex phonic rules, such as the famous Dick and Jane series.* Whole language: A philosophy of teaching reading using children's literature instead of basal readers, with an attempt to integrate reading, language and writing.* Phonics: The traditional means of teaching reading by sounding out unfamiliar words.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | June 23, 1995
Elementary school teachers say Howard County ought to streamline its curriculum because they have too many competing objectives, directives, guides and tests, and not enough time for planning and teaching reading and science.The startlingly candid report on "curriculum overload" that was presented to the Howard County school board yesterday revealed that teachers feel overwhelmed by the numerous and confusing demands put on them by the central administration.The teachers also complain about inadequate materials and resources, including a shortage of science materials, computers, textbooks and paper for copies.
FEATURES
By Susan Rapp | January 20, 1999
Much of the debate about how to teach reading centers upon whether to focus on whole language or on phonics. However, whole language has moved out of the limelight while phonemic awareness tops the scale of hot issues in 1999. The International Reading Association conducted a survey about 30 topics related to teaching reading and published the results in the current issue of Reading Today. The respondents selected had national and international perspectives on reading, came from various geographic locations across the United States and represented different populations involved in literacy education.
NEWS
August 17, 2003
Carroll Springs School to hold picnic Thursday Carroll Springs School will hold a back-to-school picnic from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday at the Carroll County Farm Museum pavilion. All students and their families are welcome. The farm museum is at 500 S. Center St., across from the school. Information: 410-751-3620. Early childhood education focus of college open house Carroll Community College will hold an early childhood education open house from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday at the 1601 Washington Road campus.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2004
Gail M. Parker, former director of the Brown Memorial Tutoring Program that helped disadvantaged inner-city children overcome reading disabilities, died of breast cancer Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 72. Born and raised Gail Munson in New Haven, Conn., she earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1953 from Smith College and a master's in reading in 1987 from what is now Towson University. At her death, Mrs. Parker was studying for a master's degree in humanities at Towson.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
Board of Education to meet Wednesday The Carroll County Board of Education will hold an administrative meeting at 5 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices at 125 N. Court St., Westminster. A work session on comprehensive reading improvement will be held after the meeting. Information: 410-751-3020. Schools will close early Thursday Carroll County public schools will close two hours and 45 minutes early Thursday, and there will be no half-day kindergarten. Schools will be closed Friday for a professional day for teachers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2004
Gail M. Parker, former director of the Brown Memorial Tutoring Program that helped disadvantaged inner-city children overcome reading disabilities, died of breast cancer Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 72. Born and raised Gail Munson in New Haven, Conn., she earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1953 from Smith College and a master's in reading in 1987 from what is now Towson University. At her death, Mrs. Parker was studying for a master's degree in humanities at Towson.
NEWS
By William Rasmussen and William Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2003
Kathy MacMillan hooked the index finger of her right hand around her left thumb. The index finger of her left hand wiggled freely, as if it was trying to escape. In the shade of a few oak trees in a Sykesville park, she explained to 30 children how Goldilocks escaped from the three bears' house - in sign language. The kids quickly got the hang of forming the sign for "running," but the moms in the back were having a bit more trouble. "It's hard," Susan Stephey said to a fellow mother, who was also struggling with the maneuver.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2003
It wasn't that long ago that Christopher Henderson, 5, didn't know what a sentence was. When he picked up a book at his Westview Park home, it was to look at the pictures. He had no idea that you read from left to right. But now the child talks to his older sister about sentences, and he reads books on his own. Christopher's mother, a postal worker and single mother, says she couldn't have taught her son these things by herself. She attributes his progress to a kindergarten program that immerses him in the beginning fundamentals of reading and writing.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
When Kay Hayes plans reading lessons for her third-graders at Mount Airy Elementary School, the 29-year teaching veteran frequently ends up on something of a scavenger hunt while rummaging for instructional materials. "Now, you have to go searching," she said. "You go to the reading books in the school storage room. Each grade level also has a storage site. And then we each have our own supply of materials we've collected over the years. We kind of beg and borrow from each other." But a new collection of books introduced at the school this week - nearly $94,000 worth of teacher guidebooks, lesson planners, pupils' textbooks, intervention handbooks and books targeted for children reading on, below and above grade level - is changing that, teachers and administrators said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - Christopher J. Doherty jumped from a puddle to an ocean. And the water's fine. On Jan. 4, Doherty, 36, was one of four full-time employees of an obscure Baltimore nonprofit agency. As director of the Baltimore Curriculum Project, he'd spent three years promoting phonics-based reading instruction in some of the city's neediest schools - and witnessing spectacular results. On Jan. 7, installed on the third floor of the vast U.S. Department of Education headquarters, he began his new job as chief of Reading First, the $5.9 billion, six-year reading component of President Bush's No Child Left Behind Act. Reading First has education officials across the nation scrambling to win grants from Doherty's office.
NEWS
August 19, 2007
The Carroll County Board of Education will hold an administrative meeting at 4 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices at 125 N. Court St., Westminster. The regular meeting agenda is posted at www.carrollk12.org. Meetings will be broadcast on CETV, Channel 21 on Comcast cable TV and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and the following Thursday and 9 a.m. Saturday. Information: 410-751-3020. Comcast donates supplies to school Robert Moton Elementary School has been selected as the recipient of the Comcast CARES Back to School Drive.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2002
President Bush's top reading adviser called on Maryland lawmakers yesterday to put more resources into early childhood education, particularly to install full-day kindergarten statewide. "It will be very difficult to make progress and catch up in a piecemeal process," said G. Reid Lyon, director of reading research at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Lyon - dubbed Bush's "reading czar" for his influence on the president's initiatives in teaching reading - said Maryland is ahead of many other states in building programs to prepare 3-, 4- and 5-year-old children for learning to read when they enter school.
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