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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Parents attending back-to-school nights during the next few weeks in Carroll County will find more than the teacher introductions and school tours to which they are accustomed. This year, they also will see a drug deal, watch a teen-ager get arrested and perhaps feel their sense of security and complacency shaken that none of this would ever happen to their child. The quick skit and ensuing presentation are part of the Not My Kid program, which will be introduced during back-to-school activities at all 36 Carroll schools to let parents know about the increasing prevalence of substance abuse throughout the county.
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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
CUMBERLAND - Leave it to others to debate whole language vs. phonics and the other academic arguments about the best way to teach children to read. Youngsters get only one message at the Western Maryland Reading Center. It's simple and direct: Reading is a good thing. Using a room in the Kingsley-Grace Mission Center in a working-class area of Cumberland, the center has welcomed a dozen or so children, ages 5 to 14, two afternoons a week during the school year. Some play games that help with word recognition.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
IN THE RECENT flurry of news about school testing locally and nationally, one accomplishment might have been missed, and it's worth noting: Direct Instruction passed the five-year test in Baltimore with flying colors. In the 1990s, when the highly scripted, phonics-based program began making waves in Baltimore, there were many doubters. Direct Instruction - DI, for short - went against the teaching practices recommended by much of the education establishment. It was considered too regimented.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
"Durante mi vida y todos mis viajes, siempre recordare que el espaM-qol es la lengua mejor." That's the way Loch Raven High School senior Michael Hackett feels about the Spanish language. For those unfamiliar with the Romance language of Spain and of Central and South America, Hackett says it's the best. He's not alone. Student enrollment in Spanish language classes in Baltimore County has challenged teacher hiring recently, and forced the Board of Education to consider spending $470,000 on new textbooks.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2000
EXACTLY 30 years ago, a researcher named George Weber set out to prove that inner-city public schools could excel at reading. Weber started with a list of 95 schools from around the country nominated by reading experts and big-city administrators. In the 1970-1971 school year, he visited 17 schools. He had third-graders tested independently. In the end, he featured four of the schools in a paper published by his employer, the Washington-based Council for Basic Education. The title: "Inner-City Children Can Be Taught to Read: Four Successful Schools."
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 2, 2000
Imagine being partially buried at the bottom of a 13-foot-deep trench, where loose dirt walls could come tumbling down any minute. Then you look up and see the faces of a specially trained crew of rescuers offering reassurance that you will get out safely. To prepare for such an emergency, Carroll County's Advanced Technical Rescue Team held a classroom and trench rescue training exercise yesterday. It continues today at Wihters participated in the exercise. Sessions include lessons in safety and the correct use of equipment.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
JOHNSON CITY, Texas -- The county is Blanco, and it's about the only thing hereabout that's not named for Lyndon Baines Johnson or his family.The local public school, naturally, is LBJ Elementary. It's where the 36th president went to grade school, though he learned to read at age 4 in a one-room school 14 miles and a million flowering bluebonnets west of here.It was in that school, now restored, that Johnson signed the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The "original education president," the National Park Service guide tells a group of us on tour, signed 50 major pieces of school legislation and believed "the only valid passport from poverty is an education."
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Next fall, all pupils in Baltimore elementary and middle schools will use new math textbooks approved last night by the school board.With the final vote to buy $9 million worth of math textbooks, the board is ending a multimillion-dollar book-buying spree as it tries to replace old math, science, reading and English textbooks throughout the school system.Officials hope the purchase will increase learning and raise test scores.Betty Morgan, chief academic officer, said she hopes schools can raise scores on the statewide tests given in third, fifth and eighth grade by 10 percentage points each year for three years.
NEWS
November 7, 1998
Children give views on teaching phonics and favorite booksMy class discussed your article "Two different teaching methods yield similarly low scores" (Oct. 3). Both schools should have spent their money more wisely.I think the schools should combine phonics and whole language because that might bring them up to at least a 2.0-grade reading level. Also, if you showed children different kinds of writing, they might look forward to reading and writing. The teachers could have visited other schools to look for more ideas.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Stephen Henderson and Debbie M. Price and Stephen Henderson,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
At City Springs Elementary, where phonics ruled instruction last year, first-graders sounded out words in twice-daily reading classes, drilled relentlessly with a teacher and an aide and took ,, weekly tests.At Lyndhurst elementary, children memorized lists of words and read aloud from storybooks; their classrooms had no aides and some teachers rarely gave diagnostic tests.While the reading instruction at the two schools couldn't have been more different, their students' results on citywide tests released last month, it turns out, were equally mediocre.
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