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NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
National board certification is yet another bright color on the canvas that is Aberdeen Middle School art teacher Edith Smith's life. Smith recently found out that after three years of hard work, she had met the criteria required to be certified through the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. She has been teaching art for 27 years, 26 at Aberdeen. "I know every stone in this place," Smith said, laughing. For pupils to be successful in her art class, "they just have to be willing to put the time in," Smith said.
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NEWS
December 24, 1994
EAI Teaching MethodsThe Sun has done quite a few articles on EAI's contract with Baltimore City, covering School Superintendent Walter Amprey's apparent loss of objectivity and the adjustment of statistics by EAI's panel of analysts.I have seen virtually no investigation, however, of two other critical aspects of EAI's work. The first pertains to teaching methods, and the second to a basic question about possible inequities in per-pupil funding.There are no deep and dark secrets in the realm of methodology.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1994
The private Calvert School, whose collaboration with the city's Barclay School has surpassed the most optimistic expectations, is expanding to another public school in the fall.Calvert will take its detailed curriculum stressing mastery of the basics -- along with materials, support staff and training -- to Carter G. Woodson Elementary in Cherry Hill, Superintendent Walter G. Amprey said yesterday.Woodson eventually would serve as a training site for staffers who would become Calvert curriculum coordinators and take its program to other city public schools.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
Bits of advice for teachers, from teachers:Let the kindergarten children cook their soup and eat it too, in class. Alphabet soup, so they can learn.Don't just read the classics. Draw them, sing them, make costumes for the heroes and villains, the peasants and noblemen, the kings and queens of centuries past.Talk about social issues -- poverty, crime, drugs, teen pregnancy, the fate of city neighborhoods -- but don't stop there. Take elementary schoolchildren to a shelter for homeless people so they may see the faces, hear the stories and perhaps avoid the same mistakes.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
Carroll schools are headed in the wrong direction, critics say, with class time being wasted on discussing self-esteem and social problems to the detriment of academics."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 22, 2003
If Diane Ravitch's The Language Police (Knopf, 255 pages, $24) gets the attention it deserves, it could do for the failures of education in the United States what Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin did for slavery. Subtitled "How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn," it is a brilliant revelation of an insidious national disease of public policy. This book may be the most important document about the future of the American mind in a generation or more. It should be obligatory reading for every citizen concerned with the intellectual, moral, and imaginative life of U.S. children and society as a whole.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2001
Parents attending back-to-school nights during the next few weeks in Carroll County will find more than the teacher introductions and school tours to which they are accustomed. This year, they also will see a drug deal, watch a teen-ager get arrested and perhaps feel their sense of security and complacency shaken that none of this would ever happen to their child. The quick skit and ensuing presentation are part of the Not My Kid program, which will be introduced during back-to-school activities at all 36 Carroll schools to let parents know about the increasing prevalence of substance abuse throughout the county.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 2, 2000
Imagine being partially buried at the bottom of a 13-foot-deep trench, where loose dirt walls could come tumbling down any minute. Then you look up and see the faces of a specially trained crew of rescuers offering reassurance that you will get out safely. To prepare for such an emergency, Carroll County's Advanced Technical Rescue Team held a classroom and trench rescue training exercise yesterday. It continues today at Wihters participated in the exercise. Sessions include lessons in safety and the correct use of equipment.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
Tango instructor Max Gonzalez watched as Peter Russell and his boyfriend crisscrossed their feet while gliding in a circular pattern. The gentle sound of their feet scuffing the wooden dance floor offset the funky new-age tango music playing from the speaker. Two years ago, the couple didn't know how to dance the tango at all. Now, the pair is among Gonzalez's best students. Russell even assists Gonzalez's gay tango class held every Monday at the Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore in Mount Vernon.
NEWS
By MIKE BOWLER and MIKE BOWLER,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1999
JOHNSON CITY, Texas -- The county is Blanco, and it's about the only thing hereabout that's not named for Lyndon Baines Johnson or his family.The local public school, naturally, is LBJ Elementary. It's where the 36th president went to grade school, though he learned to read at age 4 in a one-room school 14 miles and a million flowering bluebonnets west of here.It was in that school, now restored, that Johnson signed the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965. The "original education president," the National Park Service guide tells a group of us on tour, signed 50 major pieces of school legislation and believed "the only valid passport from poverty is an education."
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