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NEWS
October 24, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Los Angeles Times, which was published Wednesday.AMERICA'S teaching hospitals are acclaimed for their use of advanced medicine to save patients. In August, for instance, doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles successfully labored around the clock on two young boys -- one of them critically wounded -- who were shot at a Granada Hills Jewish center.Acclaim won't pay doctors or their instructors, however, and teaching hospitals are major targets this year for the $60 billion that Congress plans to cut from Medicare's hospital payments over four years under the 1997 Balanced Budget Act.Some $14 billion in cuts are slated to come out of the Medicare dollars the government now sends to teaching hospitals.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2010
Johns Hopkins Medicine has signed an agreement to open the first private, four-year medical school and teaching hospital in Malaysia in the Baltimore-based health system's latest effort to expand its reach overseas. Executives from Hopkins signed an agreement with a Malaysian partner Tuesday during a ceremony attended by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the capital, Kuala Lumpur. Hopkins will act largely in a consultative and advisory role to the Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine and Perdana University Hospital, but will have "significant control over the content and quality of the education delivered," Mohan Chellappa, president of global ventures for Johns Hopkins Medicine International, said in an e-mail.
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NEWS
By Sylvia Wood and Sylvia Wood,ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 4, 1999
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Born at 23 weeks, Baby K almost didn't make it and her twin sister died. Too young to breathe on their own, such preemies face an uphill struggle."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Kelly Brewington and Jamie Smith Hopkins,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com and Jamie.Smith.Hopkins@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
Leaders of Maryland's renowned teaching hospitals are feeling vulnerable as the push for a health care overhaul focuses attention on the tremendous differences in hospital costs around the country. Urban academic medical centers such as top-ranked Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland, with its world-class trauma center, are more expensive to run than community hospitals and rural teaching hospitals. The difference can mean patient bills that are higher by thousands of dollars.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1997
The House of Delegates yesterday weakened a bill that would give Maryland's teaching hospitals their "fair share" of Medicaid money under managed care.A final vote is expected today on the entire bill -- with the amendments approved yesterday -- which calls for a study of the problem this year. If it passes, no legislative action will take effect until mid-1998.Dr. Edward D. Miller, dean and chief executive of Johns Hopkins Medicine, called the amended bill "malarkey" and said his institution had once again been rolled by the powerful health insurance lobby.
NEWS
By Douglas J. Peddicord | June 30, 1996
ONE LESSER-KNOWN aspect of the Medicare program is that, in addition to providing health insurance for the elderly and the disabled, Medicare is the principal source of funding for the training of physicians in the United States.Last year Medicare paid out more than $5 billion toward the education costs of the teaching hospitals and academic medical centers which are the backbone of the finest medical system in the world.Graduate medical education -- the clinical training of physicians after they graduate from medical school -- is an expensive proposition.
NEWS
By Houston Chronicle | June 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The nation's research and teaching hospitals got good news last week from congressional committees that are beginning to shape health care legislation.Two Senate plans and a House proposal provide more money than President Clinton's initial proposal for hospitals that are responsible for training doctors.Under the Clinton plan, many of the hospitals would lose funds because of recommended cuts in the Medicare program that allocates about $5.8 billion annually for the training of physicians.
TOPIC
By Edward D. Miller | February 27, 2000
HEADS OF academic medical centers wont soon forget the closing year of the 1900s. One simple piece of legislation passed by the U.S. Congress, the Balanced Budget Act, battered the bottom lines of the nations leading teaching hospitals with such ferocity that many are fighting for survival. Though Congress has partially restored those funds to give those hospitals a lifeline, whats clear is that we have reached a point of real crisis in American medicine. Johns Hopkins didnt feel the force of the act as powerfully as many of our fellow university medical centers, thanks in part to Marylands unique method for meting out hospital payments.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1996
With stethoscopes slung around their necks and reference books bulging from their starched white coats, they gathered around a conference table at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Within an hour, these newly minted M.D.'s were to meet their first patients."The hard part is thinking only a month ago I was a medical student, and now, with no training in between, I'm supposed to be a doctor," said Dr. Ian Krop, 30. One of his cases was a woman his age who has sickle cell anemia. As she grimaced in agony, Krop leaned over her bedside, patting her leg as he tried to reassure her.It was Monday, July 1, the day 23,000 medical school graduates arrived at Hopkins, the University of Maryland Medical Center and other teaching hospitals across the country to begin the most grueling, intense and, perhaps, most influential phase of their training: their residencies.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1997
Dr. Ronald Lesser, a Johns Hopkins neurologist who specializes in epilepsy, never leaves his office to see patients without one vital piece of equipment stuffed into the pocket of his lab coat -- a dog-eared wad of Medicare billing guidelines."
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington and Jamie Smith Hopkins | November 29, 2009
Leaders of Maryland's renowned teaching hospitals are feeling vulnerable as the push for a health care overhaul focuses attention on the tremendous differences in hospital costs around the country. Urban academic medical centers such as top-ranked Johns Hopkins Hospital and the University of Maryland, with its world-class trauma center, are more expensive to run than community hospitals and rural teaching hospitals. The difference can mean patient bills that are higher by thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By ARTICLE BY JULIE BELL and ARTICLE BY JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2006
Dr. John Cameron, graying and slightly stooped, walks daily past a portrait of himself as a dark-haired young physician. The 1970 picture hangs in a Johns Hopkins Hospital corridor near his office. It is one among scores going back to 1890 that line these walls. Photo after photo shows the young doctors, nearly all men, as they completed training for careers in which surgical feats were expected. Cameron, 69, is the product of the age in which surgeons dominated their hospitals. They revolutionized care, producing a cult of personality in which medical residents modeled themselves after those who had boldly made their marks.
BUSINESS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
Outpatients are receiving more services when they visit Maryland hospitals, driving up their overall bills so rapidly that state regulators want to take action. The collective outpatient bill at Maryland hospitals rose 14.15 percent in the 12 months that ended April 30 - nearly double the 8.43 percent increase in inpatient charges, according to data presented yesterday at a meeting of the Health Services Cost Review Commission. Outpatient care accounts for about 30 percent of the state's hospital spending of more than $10 billion a year.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2005
The House of Representatives is expected to pass long-stalled legislation today that would expand access to a promising medication for heroin addiction, particularly in cities like Baltimore that have serious drug problems. The legislation, which has been approved by the Senate and is expected to be signed by the president, would lift a key restriction on the distribution of buprenorphine, an opiate substitute that curbs cravings for heroin or prescription painkillers and comes with advantages over the better-known addiction medication, methadone.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2001
University Physicians Inc., the faculty medical practice group at the University of Maryland, announced yesterday that it will pay $8.3 million to settle claims it overbilled Medicare. "It doesn't mean we were overbilling Medicare," said Jerome D. Carr, chief compliance and legal affairs officer for the faculty practice group, which is made up of the clinical faculty at the university's medical school. "The issue is whether there was documentation where one could look six years later at the medical record and say, `A Level 3 consultation was done on Jan. 22, 1995.
NEWS
July 7, 2000
CONGRESS, the president and federal regulations have made a mess of the health-care system. However well-intended, their actions have lowered the quality of care for millions of Americans -- especially senior citizens -- and seriously eroded the viability of hospitals, nursing homes, home health-care companies and health plans for the elderly. Much of the fault lies in Washington's myopia about the bottom line: Saving dollars wins out over spending more to deliver adequate health-care services to Americans.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1997
Johns Hopkins University and University Physicians, the faculty practice plan at the University of Maryland, are among the parties to a lawsuit challenging federal audits of Medicare billing by teaching hospitals.The suit was filed Tuesday in federal court in California by the Association of American Medical Colleges, the American Medical Association and other professional associations, medical schools and teaching hospitals.The 2-year-old audit program is aimed at making sure faculty doctors in teaching hospitals bill only for work they do directly, not for work done by residents.
NEWS
April 5, 1995
More than most states, Maryland has been successful in containing the ever-rising costs of hospital care. Through a system of sharing the burden of paying for indigent care -- and paying for the essential and expensive role of teaching hospitals -- Marylanders as a group have avoided the skyrocketing costs that have plagued other states.But the uncontrolled growth of free-standing, unlicensed surgery clinics poses a danger. While these centers provide lower costs and greater convenience and comfort for many patients, they draw business away from hospitals -- especially patients with health insurance coverage.
TOPIC
By Edward D. Miller | February 27, 2000
HEADS OF academic medical centers wont soon forget the closing year of the 1900s. One simple piece of legislation passed by the U.S. Congress, the Balanced Budget Act, battered the bottom lines of the nations leading teaching hospitals with such ferocity that many are fighting for survival. Though Congress has partially restored those funds to give those hospitals a lifeline, whats clear is that we have reached a point of real crisis in American medicine. Johns Hopkins didnt feel the force of the act as powerfully as many of our fellow university medical centers, thanks in part to Marylands unique method for meting out hospital payments.
NEWS
By Sylvia Wood and Sylvia Wood,ALBANY TIMES UNION | November 4, 1999
ALBANY, N.Y. -- Born at 23 weeks, Baby K almost didn't make it and her twin sister died. Too young to breathe on their own, such preemies face an uphill struggle."
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