Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTeachers College
IN THE NEWS

Teachers College

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 14, 1991
Charles Goren, one of the most influential figures in the history of contract bridge, died April 3 of a heart attack at age 90. Mr. Goren began tournament play as a young lawyer in Philadelphia. He developed a point system known as Standard American that became the basis of virtually all modern bidding systems.Louise Dickinson Rich, 87, whose first book, "We Took to the Woods," was a best seller in 1942, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure in Mattapoisett, Mass. In the autobiographical book, she analyzed, simply and humorously, the sudden change in the life of a city-reared teacher transplanted to the Maine wilderness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The Obama administration announced Friday that it is developing new rules aimed at improving schools by focusing on the training that teachers receive before they enter the classroom - an idea that met with a mix of cautious support and questions from Maryland's leading schools of education. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said the new regulations for training programs - which could direct more federal money to high-performing colleges and universities - will be unveiled this summer and could be in place within a year.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 4, 1991
John M. Benser, a retired Baltimore County teacher and artist, died Oct. 20 of cancer at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 57.A memorial service for Mr. Benser was held Oct. 23 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Towson.Mr. Benser, a native of Waterloo, Iowa, graduated in 1956 from Iowa State Teachers College (now the University of Northern Iowa) in Cedar Falls. He enlisted in the Army, serving in counterintelligence at Fort Holabird in Baltimore.Mr. Benser was a member of Black Hawk Lodge, a Masonic organization in Cedar Falls.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Ask first-year teachers what their greatest challenge is, and they are likely to say it has been managing squirming elementary students or keeping sleepy teenagers engaged. But too few universities that train the next generation of teachers are giving them a foundation in effective classroom management techniques, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality, a research advocacy group, which highlighted St. Mary's College of Maryland as one of the best in the nation.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
THE STRIKING thing about the latest report on the quality of education colleges' training of school principals and administrators was not its verdict, that "the majority of these programs range from inadequate to appalling." That conclusion has not changed since at least 1987, when a national study found the same. Instead, the stunning thing was that three leading organizations of principals and administrators essentially agreed that "many programs simply do not teach what it takes to run a school or a school district."
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Paul Miller has taught math for many years but never kept count. On Thursday, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. awarded Miller, 93, a calculus teacher at Ner Israel High School, for his 75th year of teaching and congratulated him on his "great influence" on so many students over the years while supporting his own family. "I never kept count," Miller said. "It's something that you do to see the finished product. " Miller was 18 when he began teaching in 1934 after attending teachers college at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS AND KATIE MARTIN and GINA DAVIS AND KATIE MARTIN,SUN REPORTERS | April 9, 2006
Students recently nominated nearly 200 teachers from schools across Carroll County to vie for the district's Teacher of the Year honors. From that group, the county Chamber of Commerce selected eight educators - four high school, two middle school and two elementary school teachers - to receive its Outstanding Teacher award. The recipients advance to the countywide Teacher of the Year competition, which is judged by school officials. The Carroll Teacher of the Year - expected to be announced next month - will advance to the statewide level.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Malcolm Taylor never took any math classes in high school. But the vocational high school graduate, now 77, took more than half a dozen classes taught by Paul Miller at what is now Baltimore City Community College, beginning with a basic, noncredit math course. "I believe Mr. Miller was the teacher that had the greatest impact on me and what I chose to do. He was the one who had the greatest impact on the trajectory of my life," said Taylor, who has worked as a math professor and statistician for the U.S. military.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Ask first-year teachers what their greatest challenge is, and they are likely to say it has been managing squirming elementary students or keeping sleepy teenagers engaged. But too few universities that train the next generation of teachers are giving them a foundation in effective classroom management techniques, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality, a research advocacy group, which highlighted St. Mary's College of Maryland as one of the best in the nation.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
Dr. Edward Carl Kuhl Jr., a former director of personnel at Harford Community College and an expert modeler, died of prostate cancer Wednesday at his home in Hickory. He was 73. Dr. Kuhl was born in Baltimore and raised in a rowhouse at Monroe and Wilhelm streets, where his father operated a shoe repair business in the first-floor front room. In his retirement, Dr. Kuhl constructed a miniature replica of the Southwest Baltimore rowhouse - a hobby that inspired him to chronicle the history of his family and of the city's rowhomes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
Malcolm Taylor never took any math classes in high school. But the vocational high school graduate, now 77, took more than half a dozen classes taught by Paul Miller at what is now Baltimore City Community College, beginning with a basic, noncredit math course. "I believe Mr. Miller was the teacher that had the greatest impact on me and what I chose to do. He was the one who had the greatest impact on the trajectory of my life," said Taylor, who has worked as a math professor and statistician for the U.S. military.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Wilhelmina Allen Garner, a retired music teacher and college counselor, died of heart failure July 20 at her daughter's San Antonio, Texas, home. She was 90 and had lived in North Baltimore and Morgan Park. Born Wilhelmina Allen in Franklin, Va., she moved to Baltimore when her father, a minister, was assigned to Leadenhall Baptist Church in South Baltimore. The family lived on Barre Street. She earned a bachelor's degree from Morgan State University in 1940. While there, she met her future husband, a Lincoln University student, William M. Garner, who became a physician and practiced in West Baltimore for many years.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Paul Miller has taught math for many years but never kept count. On Thursday, Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. awarded Miller, 93, a calculus teacher at Ner Israel High School, for his 75th year of teaching and congratulated him on his "great influence" on so many students over the years while supporting his own family. "I never kept count," Miller said. "It's something that you do to see the finished product. " Miller was 18 when he began teaching in 1934 after attending teachers college at what is now Towson University.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS AND KATIE MARTIN and GINA DAVIS AND KATIE MARTIN,SUN REPORTERS | April 9, 2006
Students recently nominated nearly 200 teachers from schools across Carroll County to vie for the district's Teacher of the Year honors. From that group, the county Chamber of Commerce selected eight educators - four high school, two middle school and two elementary school teachers - to receive its Outstanding Teacher award. The recipients advance to the countywide Teacher of the Year competition, which is judged by school officials. The Carroll Teacher of the Year - expected to be announced next month - will advance to the statewide level.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | February 1, 2006
John Cornillon, an English teacher at Harbor City High School, an alternative school in Baltimore, is one of six teachers in the nation who have been awarded the first College Board Bob Costas Grants for the Teaching of Writing. Cornillon will receive a $2,000 grant for his methods to inspire students and develop their writing skills. He will be recognized Feb. 16 at the College Board's Middle States Regional Forum in Philadelphia. The award was named for Bob Costas, a broadcaster and author, for his work on behalf of the College Board's National Commission on Writing.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
THE STRIKING thing about the latest report on the quality of education colleges' training of school principals and administrators was not its verdict, that "the majority of these programs range from inadequate to appalling." That conclusion has not changed since at least 1987, when a national study found the same. Instead, the stunning thing was that three leading organizations of principals and administrators essentially agreed that "many programs simply do not teach what it takes to run a school or a school district."
SPORTS
By Ed Sherman and Ed Sherman,Chicago Tribune | December 9, 1990
CHICAGO -- Lou Holtz wrote a book. So did Bo Schembechler and Barry Switzer.All of those books became best sellers, which says something about America's fascination with college sports.Murray Sperber also wrote a book about college sports, which was released this fall. It hasn't become a best seller, and that's too bad.It seems the public would rather read stories about Holtz's motivational methods or Schembechler's relationship with Woody Hayes. Switzer's book, "Bootlegger's Boy," is worth reading if only for sections on his wild and turbulent upbringing.
NEWS
By Carol M. Bowers and Carol M. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1994
Malcolm Davies, a retired teacher, geographer, author, college dean and Baltimore television innovator, died of arteriosclerosis Friday at the nursing complex of the Charlestown Retirement Community in Catonsville. He was 78.Dr. Davies, who retired in 1979 as director of engineering, marine science and technology at Baltimore Junior College, now Baltimore City Community College, also helped plan the Maryland Science Center and the National Aquarium.His service to education included 42 years in the Baltimore school system, starting in elementary grades, and more than 10 years of work in the late 1950s and early 1960s developing science-oriented television programs for local stations.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
Dr. Edward Carl Kuhl Jr., a former director of personnel at Harford Community College and an expert modeler, died of prostate cancer Wednesday at his home in Hickory. He was 73. Dr. Kuhl was born in Baltimore and raised in a rowhouse at Monroe and Wilhelm streets, where his father operated a shoe repair business in the first-floor front room. In his retirement, Dr. Kuhl constructed a miniature replica of the Southwest Baltimore rowhouse - a hobby that inspired him to chronicle the history of his family and of the city's rowhomes.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and By Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2001
Three years ago, Maryland moved to put muscle where there had been flab in reading instruction in the state's public schools -- by greatly increasing the number of college reading courses required of almost all teachers and those waiting in the wings at the state's education schools. It was a bold initiative, heralded as the toughest in the nation. But even though the state called for significant improvements at its teacher colleges, the changes have been agonizingly slow, according to educators and state officials.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.