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June 5, 2000
THE HBO movie "Cheaters" tells the true story of Chicago high school students and a teacher who used a stolen test to win a tough academic competition. The cheaters didn't win in the long run. They were caught after one participant confessed in a school essay. But the film projects the students as heroes whose ignominious acts were considered justifiable because people break rules all the time to get ahead on the job and in business. But cheating is never right. It corrupts systems and the soul.
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NEWS
By Lauren Loricchio, Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 5, 2014
Even after 31 years, Gunpowder Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Anne Cross feels like her career is just beginning. Cross, who has taught at the school in Perry Hall since 1991, was recognized by Baltimore County school officials as the 2014-2015 Teacher of the Year during an award ceremony Monday at Loch Raven High School.   She was chosen from a group of 119 nominees and is the first elementary school teacher to win the award since 2010-2011.  "I'm grateful for the acknowledgment at this point in my career," Cross said.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | October 13, 2004
Representatives of Maryland's school boards and superintendents lobbied skeptical Annapolis lawmakers yesterday to restart a program designed to fill critical school openings by rehiring retired teachers and principals. "This is an option we all need," said Carl Roberts, superintendent of Cecil County public schools, who spoke on behalf of the Public School Superintendents Association of Maryland. Lawmakers had intended for the program to help school systems struggling to find top-notch teachers and principals for struggling schools and key subjects such as math, science and special education.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Maryland has faced several challenges in fulfilling its $250 million promise to overhaul the way it educates students and evaluates educators, the U.S. Department of Education reported Wednesday. In a report on the state's progress in reaching goals in the third year of the federal Race to the Top program, the department identified the greatest obstacles: implementing the Common Core standards, creating new teacher and principal evaluations, and building new data systems. The department assessed progress in 11 states and the District of Columbia that were among the first to sign on to Race to the Top, a $4.35 billion program created by President Barack Obama to encourage school reforms.
NEWS
September 20, 2004
IN ANNE ARUNDEL County, at least two theories are being tested by the school system this academic year. First, paying more money to teachers and principals who are willing to work at less-desirable schools will likely improve those schools. And similarly, an incentive bonus to these same employees should help lift student test scores. Both ideas are worth exploring, and Superintendent Eric J. Smith deserves to be commended for moving forward with this experiment. Unions traditionally view such incentive plans skeptically, but Mr. Smith made the case this summer, and after some negotiation, the county's education unions relented.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2004
Anne Arundel County school officials are considering expansion of an ambitious -- and expensive -- incentive program aimed at getting teachers and principals to work at schools that have failed to meet state performance targets and offering added bonuses if those schools improve. The program, which school officials say might cost up to $3 million this year at a total of 14 failing schools, has drawn interest from staffers at schools that successfully meet the state's performance targets, as well as from teachers' assistants, who are not currently eligible for the bonuses.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
HOWARD COUNTY once built a school with a wondrous, state-of-the-art library. One parent, a librarian herself in a neighboring county, marveled at the learning resources that awaited her children. But then her fifth-grader began to report what went on in the library. Instead of letting the kids explore the riches on the shelves, the librarian read them storybooks. It happens all the time in Maryland: Wasted resources and uninspired instruction make librarians seem unimportant and even expendable to other educators.
NEWS
January 19, 1991
Is is possible to run a loose confederation of 24 school systems without a vast, sprawling bureaucracy? Maryland school superintendent Joseph L. Shilling believes that may be the only way to spur dramatic improvement in public education. And to back up his belief, Dr. Shilling is proposing that his own bureaucracy be cut by 70 percent, from 1,400 education specialists to just 400.What a relief! An educator who doesn't want to strangle teachers and principals in red tape and regulations. An educator who wants the central state education office to help those on the front lines do a better job of teaching youngsters how to read, write, compute and think.
NEWS
December 14, 1997
Academic failure begins in students homeArticles and columns in The Sun concerning the inadequacy of the Baltimore City school system place the overwhelming responsibility for the academic failure of the students on the teachers and principals.To be sure, the teachers and principals do bear a degree ofculpability for these shortcomings. However, not one article places the bulk of the responsibility where it irrefutably belongs -- on parents.Baltimore City school attendance is far below that of the counties.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 16, 1998
Baltimore City and Carroll County public schools are among six districts in Maryland that will receive $250,000 each from the federal Goals 2000 program.Baltimore will use its grant to train teachers to increase student performance in language arts, and Carroll will fund a project to improve reading scores of second- and third-graders on state and national tests. Other districts receiving Goals 2000 grants are Dorchester, Kent, Washington and Worcester counties.In addition, the Maryland State Department of Education will use a $150,000 grant to form a consortium of educators from the state's 24 school districts to work with colleges and universities to improve the preparation and evaluation of teachers and principals.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Sister Dolores Baumgartner, a retired parochial school and orphanage principal during her 74 years as a member of the School Sisters of Notre Dame, died of a heart attack Thursday at her order's Maria Health Care Center in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. She was 93. Born Dolores Julia Baumgartner in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of Bernard Baumgartner and the former Frances Reischmann. She attended St. Boniface School in North Philadelphia and decided to join the religious order in 1936.
NEWS
By Jason Botel | May 19, 2013
As the founder of KIPP Baltimore, which operates two high-performing public charter schools in the city, I am heartened and encouraged by our progress over the past six years under schools CEO Andrés Alonso. As I move to a new role as executive director of MarylandCAN - the Maryland Campaign for Achievement Now - I am hopeful that many of the policies and approaches that have driven this progress will be replicated in other Maryland school systems. But the work in Baltimore is far from over.
NEWS
By Lillian Lowery and Betty Weller | August 29, 2012
There's excitement in the air for students, parents and educators as schools across Maryland open their doors for a new school year. Students enter new classrooms, parents learn about new expectations for their children, and educators begin another year with a renewed focus on continued academic improvement. There is an extra layer of excitement this year as new teacher and principal evaluation systems are piloted in each of the state's 24 school systems. The purpose of these systems is to strengthen the knowledge, skills and classroom practices of educators to improve the achievement of our students.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
Dr. Evelyn P. Valentine, a veteran Baltimore public school educator who was founder of the Pasteur Center for Strategic Management Ltd., died Thursday of heart disease at her Northeast Baltimore home. She was 77. The daughter of a furniture maker and a homemaker, Evelyn Pasteur was born and raised in Beaufort, N.C., where she graduated from Queen Street High School. She was the eldest of 15 children. She started attending school when she was 4, and entered college at 15. She was 19 when she landed her first teaching job. "I had to hurry and get out of the way because there were so many behind me," she told the old Sunday Sun Magazine in a 1975 interview, explaining that her brothers and sisters who were out of college helped those who were still studying for their degrees.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2012
Howard "Bud" Ritter Jr., a retired Towson High School principal who had a second career as an antique toy and train dealer, died of dementia Monday at the Presbyterian Home of Maryland. The longtime Towson resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised in Rodgers Forge and in Stoneleigh, he was a 1946 graduate of Towson High School, where he played basketball and tennis. As a young man, he worked at the Bethlehem Steel Co. and as a Senator Theatre usher. Mr. Ritter enrolled at Towson State Teachers College.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2010
Barbara Ann Tarver, who worked in Baltimore schools as a teacher and assistant principal for more than three decades, died Aug. 22 from injuries sustained in a two-car crash early that morning on Interstate 70. She was 61. Ms. Tarver was born, raised and educated in Baltimore. She graduated from Western High School in 1966 and earned a bachelor's degree in elementary education from what is now Coppin State University, where she joined the Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. in 1970. A few years later, she received a master's degree from the same school, remembers friend Ann Ezell.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2005
A committee of state lawmakers voted unanimously yesterday to support restarting a program aimed at filling critical school openings by hiring retired teachers and principals. "There is a fundamental agreement among us all that this program has value if it's directed at schools in need," Sen. Edward J. Kasemeyer, co-chairman of the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Pensions, said before the vote. Until it expired last year, the program allowed school systems to pay retired teachers and principals a full salary while they kept collecting their pensions.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2003
James R. Sasiadek, the new president of Baltimore County's school board, said he wants the board to tackle school crowding, help educators meet demanding legal requirements and maintain standards of excellence under his leadership. "We want all of our kids to have a good education," Sasiadek said last week, after his unanimous election to the top post. "That's one of the hallmarks of a sound county - who wants to move to a county without a good school system?" A longtime principal in Baltimore City who has been active in county schools for years, Sasiadek, 55, succeeded Donald L. Arnold, who had led the school board for four years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Ruth E. "Elaine" Kolakowski, a longtime Baltimore County educator and administrator who sewed quilts for hospitalized and abused children, died Thursday of facioscapulohumeral, or FSH, a rare form of muscular dystrophy, at St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 68. Ruth Elaine Lancaster, who was known by her middle name, was born in Baltimore and raised on Banbury Road in Anneslie. She was a 1958 graduate of Towson High School and that year received certificates in voice and piano from the Peabody Conservatory's Preparatory Department.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 24, 2009
Sister Mary Elaine Costello, a member of the Religious Sisters of Mercy and a retired educator and administrator, died Wednesday of heart disease at The Villa, her order's retirement home in the Woodbrook neighborhood of Baltimore County. She was 96. Mary Elizabeth Costello was born in Washington, and after the death of her mother, was sent by her father to Mount St. Agnes in Mount Washington, where she attended elementary and high school. "There, her widowed father could count on her aunt, Sister Loretta Costello, author of "The Sisters of Mercy of Maryland 1855-1930," to keep an eye on his daughter," said Sister Augusta Reilly, a member of the Sisters of Mercy and a retired educator.
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