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NEWS
November 29, 2009
The Howard County Arts Council is looking for teachers to fill positions in its Visual and Performing Arts Summer Camps next year. Camps are open to students in grades K-7. Interested teachers should contact Wendy Meetze at 410-313-2787 for more information.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
Perra S. Bell, a former Towson University history teacher who was a lifelong crusader for civil rights, died Sept. 26 at Physicians Regional Medical Center in Naples, Fla., of complications from a fractured hip. The former Baltimore resident was 95. "She was such a character and had such influence promoting racial equality in so many ways, but not in a flamboyant way," said her daughter, Jane Bell Kiester of Marco Island, Fla. "She was feisty and...
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EXPLORE
March 8, 2012
Editor: I am writing in response to Mr. Flen's letter to the editor published on Feb. 24. My daughter is an elementary school teacher and I know that she and her colleagues do not work 70 percent of the time! That may be what they are paid for, but that is not what they work. If you drive by any Harford County public school, you will see cars there well before the school day begins and also after the day ends. Teachers spend several hours before and after school preparing their lessons.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Dorothy V. Thomas, a retired city public school educator who lovingly guided students at Windsor Hills Elementary School for nearly two decades, died June 10 of respiratory failure at Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center in Catonsville. She was 98. "Mrs. Thomas was such a powerful and phenomenal influence on my life and all of her students. She was old-school, and her commitment went beyond the classroom," said Sidney Clifton, a former student who is now a Hollywood producer.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
As the husband of a teacher and brother-in-law of two other teachers, I have to say Dan Rodricks ' recent column ("This looks a lot like playing hooky," Nov. 13) about teacher absences is missing a big chunk of the story. The fact is the only time off teachers have available to them during the school year are sick days and two or three personal days. They don't get three weeks or more of paid vacation like a lot of people do in their jobs. This is the only time available to them.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
Re your editorial "Pay for Performance" (Aug.22): Yes, by all means, evaluate and compensate teachers on the basis of student performance. But why limit this process to educators? Let's apply the same norms to other professionals. Let's evaluate dentists according to performance, paying them more when their patients show progress in avoiding cavities, less when periodontal work is necessary. Let's evaluate and compensate physicians according to changes in their patients' health, with penalties assigned for overweight patients with heart attacks, or smoking patients who incur lung cancer.
NEWS
December 19, 2009
P arents in Detroit are fuming over the abysmal scores of city students on a national achievement test - and demanding that the officials responsible for their kids' failure go to jail. Of the 18 big cities that participated in the federally sponsored National Assessment of Educational Progress, Detroit came in dead last, with 69 percent of fourth-graders and 77 percent of eighth-graders scoring below the basic level in math. (Charlotte, N.C., topped the list, while Baltimore City ranked near the middle.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial, "How to end the killing" (July 9), your last paragraph made me want to vomit. "No doubt, Baltimore needs effective police and prosecutors, ample drug treatment, better schools, and more economic opportunities. " How dare you accuse, through implication or otherwise, that the need for "better schools" is a reason there is so much killing. Had you defined the loosely-used term, "better schools," perhaps I and probably others may not have been so nauseated.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
Regarding your article about Harford County teachers, our teachers were promised a significant raise and weren't given it ("High school teachers stage protest in Harford County," May 30). We wouldn't be where we are today without teachers, and they're underappreciated. They don't make a lot of money, so they deserved this raise. Instead, all of our money is going toward athletes and singers, who aren't doing anything to shape our world. I hope these protests work out, because these teachers undoubtedly have earned the money.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
J. Robert Clark's letter ( "Waivers are for lazy teachers," March 30) is particularly disturbing since I spent 42 years in Baltimore classrooms. He attacks teachers as being lazy because they want waivers to excuse snow days. Then he throws in that he is a Baltimore County bus driver who doesn't get paid much and then moves to attack U.S. educational performance, followed by a tirade against the Common Core curriculum. If he had any focus to his rant, it seems to be that teachers are lazy.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Kathleen M. Happ, a retired Anne Arundel Community College educator who ws an active member of Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church on Bolton Hill, died Sept. 19 of lung cancer at Villages Hospice in The Villages, Fla. A former resident of the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood, Ms. Happ was 69. "Kathy was a truly remarkable and exceedingly talented professional. She had integrity, was always positive and a professional in her field," said Martha A. "Marty" Smith, who headed the college from 1994 until 2012, when she retired.
NEWS
October 4, 2014
State lawmakers and educators are right to be concerned about how much time it presently takes to clear or dismiss teachers accused of misconduct. When teachers are yanked out of their classrooms for months or even years while allegations of wrongdoing are investigated, both they and their students suffer from the absence. Maryland's school districts need to expedite the process by which such cases are resolved, but they must do so in a way that is fair to teachers while protecting the vulnerable young people entrusted to their care.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A limit should be set on the time it takes to clear or dismiss a teacher accused of misconduct so that employees do not remain out of their schools for months and even years, legislators and education advocates said this week. While two legislators suggested action by the General Assembly, an education advocate said some agreement could be reached between unions and school systems on how to expedite a process that is expensive to taxpayers and detrimental to children whose classrooms are staffed by substitutes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
While Baltimore County officials were deciding whether Michael Williams was fit to continue teaching, he was assigned to a dusty, windowless room at a Pulaski Highway warehouse that held old textbooks, surplus computers and other materials. He, along with a dozen or so employees, sat at a long table reading detective novels and playing Trivial Pursuit. Sometimes they would fall asleep until supervisors, watching from a security camera, came in to wake them up. Williams, who had been accused of touching a girl on the cheek with a yardstick, was paid his full salary plus benefits for more than a year to show up at the warehouse when school was in session.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Carol A. MacPhail, who had been an administrator and art teacher at Friends School and Bryn Mawr School, died Wednesday of breast cancer at her Lutherville home. She was 71. The daughter of Norbert Albert Witt, who had been president of Noxell, and Cecile R. Porter Witt, a homemaker, the former Carol Ann Witt was born in Detroit. She spent her early years in Evanston, Ill., and Greenwich, Conn., before moving to Homeland in 1954 with her family. She was a 1961 graduate of Friends School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1965 from the University of Maryland, College Park and a master's degree in 1977 in fine arts from the Maryland Institute College of Art . In 1989, she earned a master's degree in guidance and counseling from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Robert Gately Keenan Sr., a retired Baltimore County public schools agriculture teacher who was a Roman Catholic deacon, died of a brain tumor Tuesday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Parkville resident was 77. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Robert Keenan, an electrician, and Mary Catherine Gately, a homemaker. He grew up in Miami, where he attended schools. He earned a bachelor's degree in agriculture education at the University of Maryland, College Park in 1959. As a student taking senior-year education classes, he met his future wife, Olivia "Libbi" Lange.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Elizabeth M. Solter, an accomplished equestrian and teacher who had been a member of the U.S. Equestrian Team and went on to a successful career as a rider, died Sept. 12 of breast cancer at Amberly Farms, her farm in Berlin, Worcester County. She was 47. "I saw Elizabeth come up through the ranks and hit the heights, and it was a joy to watch. She just had natural ability," said Tommy Serio, one of the top riders and trainers in the country, who was a longtime friend and competitor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Vincent J. Salkoski, who taught mathematics in Baltimore public schools and was a World War II veteran, died Sept. 3 of heart disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. Vincent Joseph Salkoski was born in Baltimore and raised in Curtis Bay, where he was a member of the Curtis Bay Athletic Club. After graduating from Southern High School in 1944, he enlisted in the Marine Corps and served as a rifleman and mortarman. He participated in the occupation of China. After being discharged in 1946, he took courses at City College and the Johns Hopkins University to receive his teaching certification.
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