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By Jeannette Veatch | March 9, 1992
ED SCHOOL FOLLIES: THE MISEDUCATION OF AMERICA'S TEACHERS. By Rita Kramer. The Free Press. 228 pages. $22.95. THIS BOOK supports my long-held suspicion that there is a campaign, if not an actual conspiracy, to destroy public schooling and the schools of education in America.Certainly these institutions have problems, but the savagery of this attack and others is far from helpful. In fact, Ms. Kramer's book provides a "smoking gun," so to speak, for my suspicion. Ms. Kramer credits "Midge Decter . . . [who]
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NEWS
August 22, 2014
I read with great interest your article, "Residency program tries to solve problem of teacher burnout" (Aug. 18) about the Baltimore-based Urban Teacher Center developed by Jennifer Green, a former employee of the Baltimore City Schools. This initiative to procure highly talented, dual-certified future educators to serve our urban students is, like many teacher education pathways to certification in Maryland, a viable and successful endeavor. The Urban Teacher Center (UTC) reminds me of a similar program initiated under my supervision when I served as the human resource officer for the Baltimore City Public Schools.
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NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2001
Towson University's teacher education program, which lost its national accreditation nearly a decade ago, has won it back after a review. The Washington-based National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education said Towson, the largest trainer of teachers in Maryland, met all of its standards during a site visit last fall and an examination of school records. An NCATE review in late 1991 faulted Towson for its large number of part-time faculty members and the excessive course loads of some professors.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
The Obama administration announced Friday that it is developing new rules aimed at improving schools by focusing on the training that teachers receive before they enter the classroom - an idea that met with a mix of cautious support and questions from Maryland's leading schools of education. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said the new regulations for training programs - which could direct more federal money to high-performing colleges and universities - will be unveiled this summer and could be in place within a year.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
The state schools chief placed the teacher education program at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore on probation yesterday after students performed poorly on national examinations. "There was a huge disparity" in pass rates between UMES students and those at the state's 21 other teacher training schools, said schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, who took the action as part of her responsibility under the federal Higher Education Act. Yesterday was the deadline for states to inform the U.S. secretary of education of low-performing teacher education programs.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
THE SCIENCE of reading instruction is getting tougher in Maryland colleges and universities. On Monday, the organization that accredits the state's 22 teacher-training institutions announced a new set of standards, shifting emphasis from what is to be "covered" to what is to be learned. That should cut the number of teacher education graduates who have barely a clue about reading. To be licensed by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education - Maryland schools are required to be NCATE-licensed under a new state law - a college must "demonstrate to us that each candidate can, in fact, cause children to learn," said Arthur E. Wise, council president.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Rochelle "Shelley" Ingram, a teacher of teachers and former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Education and director of its graduate education programs, died of a neurological disease Monday at her Owings Mills home. She was 59. Friends said that in her 35 years in the education field, Dr. Ingram strove to overcome ethnic and cultural differences, and ardently believed society must educate its young to achieve high levels of competence. "She wanted the very best teachers in the world for Maryland's children," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
NEWS
August 10, 2003
Eisenbeiser to head teacher education, child care institute Anne Arundel Community College has named Colleen K. Eisenbeiser of Severna Park to head its new Teacher Education and Child Care Institute. She started July 1. Eisenbeiser led AACC's award-winning Teacher Technology Training project, while on loan from the Anne Arundel County public school system, from February 1998 until her appointment as director of the institute. She designed curriculum and trained county teachers to use computer software and to incorporate technology into their lesson plans, increasing student computer literacy.
NEWS
November 1, 2010
Childs' Walker's excellent article ( "University programs await K-12 reforms," Nov. 1) only alludes to a critical aspect of K-12 education reform: how to encourage our most talented and best students to enter the education profession. The recent McKinsey and Company report, "Closing the Talent Gap: Attracting and Retaining Top Third Graduates to a Career in Teaching" addressed this issue. It is important because of the increased expectations of teachers but also because of the need to replace the roughly half of our 3.5 million teachers will be eligible to retire during the next decade.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
Fran Kroll had her eye on the outstanding faculty member of the year award ever since she came to Howard Community College 16 1/2 years ago. Her wait is over. Last night, as HCC's Board of Trustees announced her achievement to the campus, Kroll broke into a huge grin. Administrators say Kroll - who has a relentless workload as coordinator of the early childhood development and teacher education programs - richly deserves the honor. "She's just a one-person dynamo," said Jerrold Casway, chairman of HCC's social sciences division, in which Kroll works.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
Sister Lois Mueller, a Sister of Mercy whose career as a teacher and administrator took her to parochial schools in Baltimore, Washington and Georgia, died Wednesday of pneumonia at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center. She was 98. "I have known Sister Lois since the 1960s, when she was my superior at St. Bernardine's on Gorsuch Avenue, and she was always a very great lady," said Sister Faith McKean of the Sisters of Mercy. "She was very gentle - but could be determined - but very gentle.
NEWS
August 19, 2013
Between Egypt and disgraced politicians, August has proven itself a more robust month for news than usual this year, yet there's always room in the summer doldrums for the wacky and off-beat. And for generations, few individuals have proven themselves better suited to provide that brand of comic relief than the men who have served as Maryland's comptroller. Whether it was Louis L. Goldstein's tireless campaigning or his cheerful but grammatically-challenged signature send-off, "God bless y'all real good," or even William Donald Schaefer's diatribes against the world or generally bizarre behavior, Maryland comptrollers have a tradition of quirky entertainment.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
In remarks that elicited applause from 800 Baltimore County English teachers, U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Wednesday that teachers should earn more and there should be more focus on educating the whole child. Duncan addressed the group at a time when teachers are returning to classrooms to carry out difficult changes that have filtered down from Washington. His stop at a teachers meeting at Perry Hall High School was an attempt to boost morale and signal that he is sympathetic to their problems.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Several months after Nancy S. Grasmick left her job as state superintendent of schools, Michelle Rhee, the former schools chief in Washington, spoke in Baltimore and let a secret slip. She told the crowd at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall that Grasmick had said she wanted her next job to be helping to revamp the way teachers are prepared for the profession. Rhee, a hard-line education reformer, was pleased that Grasmick might help improve the training that Rhee thinks is so lacking in teacher colleges.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
A national study on the quality of student teaching at schools of education ranks two of the three programs examined in Maryland as weak. The National Council on Teacher Quality, which ranked a random sample of three institutions in each state, gave Mount St. Mary's University and Salisbury University "weak" ratings and University of Maryland, Baltimore County a rating of "good. " The council spent two years working on the study, which looks at the student teaching experience at 134 institutions of higher education.
NEWS
By Marc Tucker and Jerry Weast | June 20, 2011
Maryland's schools have earned top rankings and plaudits in recent years. Yet as students from other countries continue to outscore their U.S. counterparts on international math, science and reading tests, even here the demands for lifting caps on the number of charter schools, tying teacher pay to student performance, and revising or abolishing teacher seniority and tenure rules have grown more insistent. Can any of these measures — or more traditional proposals, such as increasing education funding or reducing class size — propel the U.S. into the ranks of the top-performing nations?
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1994
You may not like Ralph Fessler's proposals for overhauling teacher education in Maryland, but it's hard to argue that he doesn't know his subject matter. The former elementary school teacher, principal and administrator now directs the Johns Hopkins University's Division of Education.His specialty: the professional training of teachers.So last year, when the state's school superintendent and commissioner of higher education jointly appointed a task force to redesign teacher education, it was hardly a stretch when they asked Dr. Fessler, 51, to be chairman.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Wilhelmina Allen Garner, a retired music teacher and college counselor, died of heart failure July 20 at her daughter's San Antonio, Texas, home. She was 90 and had lived in North Baltimore and Morgan Park. Born Wilhelmina Allen in Franklin, Va., she moved to Baltimore when her father, a minister, was assigned to Leadenhall Baptist Church in South Baltimore. The family lived on Barre Street. She earned a bachelor's degree from Morgan State University in 1940. While there, she met her future husband, a Lincoln University student, William M. Garner, who became a physician and practiced in West Baltimore for many years.
NEWS
November 1, 2010
Childs' Walker's excellent article ( "University programs await K-12 reforms," Nov. 1) only alludes to a critical aspect of K-12 education reform: how to encourage our most talented and best students to enter the education profession. The recent McKinsey and Company report, "Closing the Talent Gap: Attracting and Retaining Top Third Graduates to a Career in Teaching" addressed this issue. It is important because of the increased expectations of teachers but also because of the need to replace the roughly half of our 3.5 million teachers will be eligible to retire during the next decade.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2010
Wilhelmina Allen Garner, a retired music teacher and college counselor, died of heart failure July 20 at her daughter's San Antonio, Texas, home. She was 90 and had lived in North Baltimore and Morgan Park. Born Wilhelmina Allen in Franklin, Va., she moved to Baltimore when her father, a minister, was assigned to Leadenhall Baptist Church in South Baltimore. The family lived on Barre Street. She earned a bachelor's degree from Morgan State University in 1940. While there, she met her future husband, a Lincoln University student, William M. Garner, who became a physician and practiced in West Baltimore for many years.
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