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NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | September 24, 2006
Beth Harbinson keeps a change jar in the kitchen, and every three months the family decides how to spend the money. Her daughter, Sarah, 9, wants some of the money to go to charity next time, maybe to a domestic violence center. She had dinner with some families at a local center, so she knows how important the center is. Harbinson, who lives in Ellicott City and works as a development consultant for nonprofits, believes that children can be philanthropists even when they are young. They don't have to give a lot of money, she says.
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NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2006
Pupils at Youth's Benefit Elementary School perused the school grounds before settling on a barren area by the Fallston school's front entrance to plant a garden. After the space was tilled, they planted native plants, such as bee balm, hydrangeas and black-eyed Susans. Next, they spread mulch. They also set up two barrels to collect rainwater that drains from the roof of the school. Just a few days after planting the garden, they saw results. "I think the children have some sort of magic powers," said Karen DeHart, a teacher in the gifted-and-talented program at Youth's Benefit.
NEWS
By DANIEL BUCCINO AND HANNAH FENTON-ROBERTSON | November 27, 2005
The air is filled with talk of sleep. Every new parent has the conversation and, since all non-parents sleep, everyone else has an opinion about the best way to get the kids to bed. Whether we're debating the best techniques for putting babies to sleep or bemoaning the explosion of prescription sleep aids by adolescents, sleep is on our minds as we descend into the somnolent winter doldrums. What few realize is that children have to be taught how to fall asleep and stay asleep. Each parent and family must invent for itself ways for everyone to get some sleep.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2005
Remember those school assemblies with McGruff the trenchcoat-wearing, crime-fighting dog? Or Smokey Bear in his dungarees and forest ranger's hat? Yesterday, Howard County rolled out a mascot for an era of dirty bombs and Category 5 hurricanes: Ready Eddie, a sunglasses-wearing, emergency kit-toting flashlight who helped second-graders prepare for terrorist strikes and natural disasters. Hurricane Katrina reminded Americans of the importance of fending for themselves for days on end. But there is no national preparedness campaign for children - the Department of Homeland Security is set to release one within the next six months - so Howard created one as part of a weeklong series of readiness events.
NEWS
By ELLIE BAUBLITZ and ELLIE BAUBLITZ,SUN REPORTER | October 9, 2005
The 13 youngsters at the Eldersburg library branch vigorously rubbed the bow string across the wooden dowel rod, trying to heat a spoon held on top of the rod. "This is neat," said Joseph Padula, 7, of Eldersburg. "Do we get to keep these when we're done?" Joseph and Joshua Stem, another 7-year-old from Eldersburg, rubbed the string so hard that the spoon bent from the heat, teaching them the lesson for the day - friction makes heat. The experiment was part of an "Aha! Science at Your Library" program offered Wednesdays and Saturdays at the branch.
NEWS
By Danny Jacobs and Danny Jacobs,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2005
Police officers Lauren Phillips and Marcus Milford arrived to intervene in a dispute between two downtown merchants. A boutique owner accused an employee of a nearby design studio of loitering in front of the boutique and driving away business. With the officers looking on -- and reminding them of the fine for loitering -- the studio owner chastised her employee and assured the boutique owner it wouldn't happen again. "Case closed," Officer Phillips said with a smile. A typical day in the city -- except that the police and the citizens were all kids.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 3, 2005
"Aye, aye!" exclaimed Nicholas Paone as he swaggered aboard the ship. The 6-year-old swirled his sword in the air and snarled, "Arrrgh! I'll find the treasure, and then I'll be captain of this ship." Nicholas joined a six-person crew and 21 other young pretend marauders for the inaugural voyage of Treasure Hunters aboard the skipjack Martha Lewis in Havre de Grace. Designed as an educational outing for children, the narrated, two-hour trip combines Chesapeake Bay history and landmarks with rudimentary navigation to search for buried treasure.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 8, 2005
IF PARENTS DO a poor job talking to their children about sex, they do a worse job talking to them about money. And, as is the case with sex, teens say they want to hear from their parents on the subject. They recognize, even without our telling them, that it is important to their future. "Kids don't have any of the mechanics of managing money or the skills," says Carrie Schwab Pomerantz, daughter of the founder of the Charles Schwab investment company. "And a lot of it has to do with the fact that parents aren't talking to their kids and teaching them.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2005
The goal of the children's letter-writing workshop was more than stamps and sealing wax. It was to connect the dots between the post office, literacy and democracy in the early years of the American republic. Dressed in an early 19th-century housedress was the teacher, Nancy A. Gardner, who supervised the recent Historic Annapolis Foundation weekend event at the William Paca House, a Colonial mansion. To underscore the importance of letter-writing, Gardner brought along a few authored by Founding Fathers, including Benjamin Franklin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
Families can explore a world of books Saturday at the Multicultural Children's Book Festival at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. The ninth annual event will present author readings, talks with illustrators, book-signings, musical and dance performances, multicultural workshops and other interactive activities, all geared to kids, parents and educators. More than 500 story books, picture books, fairy tales, historical books, biographies, novels, performing arts books and specialty books for toddlers, adolescents, preteens and teens will be displayed.
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