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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 9, 2000
How do you teach children the basics of investing? Black Enterprise, June, suggests: "Review the family budget with your kids; let them see you pay monthly bills. ... Teach children to plan their purchases, avoiding impulse buying. ... Teach them to avoid the trap of `one-time' credit-card offers. ... Get your children to start investing early." CAREER CORNER: The best jobs for 2000 and beyond, according to Time, May 29, include: Tissue engineers ("25 years from now scientists will pull a pancreas from a Petri dish")
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
Karen Lewand, a preservationist and educator who launched a series of walking tours while establishing programs for children to learn about architecture, died of cancer Dec. 20 at her home in the Radnor-Winston section of North Baltimore. She was 67. "She was an innovator, a leader and a strong advocate for preserving Baltimore's historic buildings and neighborhoods, and helped Baltimore grow in countless ways. With an unwavering voice for preserving the best of our architecture and neighborhoods, she was instrumental in saving historic places that many of us now take for granted," said Johns Hopkins, executive director of Baltimore Heritage.
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | January 30, 1998
HOW DO you teach children about money and investing? While saving money is relatively easy to explain, investing is more difficult.Regarding saving, have your children put their spare coins in a jar. When the jar is full, they can buy some of the things they want."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
Kara Marian Cook, an accomplished horsewoman and artist who was studying to become a hair stylist, died April 12 of injuries sustained in a Baltimore County automobile accident. The Reisterstown resident was 21. On April 12, Ms. Cook was driving north on Greenspring Avenue at 5:31 p.m., when her 2000 BMW struck a 2006 Mercedes-Benz that was stopped and making a left turn on Garrison Forest Road. Her car then collided with a guard rail. Ms. Cook was transported to Sinai Hospital, where she was pronounced dead, said a spokeswoman for the Baltimore County Police Department.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2000
A group of children at River Hill Village Center surrounded actress Helen O'Grady one recent afternoon and yelled as loud as they could. The ruckus was music to O'Grady's ears. As the founder and executive director of DramaKids International, O'Grady has developed an organization that uses the arts to teach children confidence and verbal skills The after-school program made its United States debut in Howard County, enrolling dozens of youngsters who come for one, fun-filled hour a week.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Howard Libit and research librarian Andrea Wilson contributed to this article | November 5, 1997
Stacy Harrison brought years of study and a lifetime of dreams this fall to her new job of teaching 24 second-graders at Harford County's Ring Factory Elementary School. But, by her own admission, she is ill-prepared to teach them in the most important subject of all: reading.New research shows that children need early and intensive instruction in the sounds that make up words and their relationships to letters. Harford's curriculum requires her to teach these building blocks of reading.But in her four years at Towson University's education college, Harrison was taught little about how to teach these essential tools for early readers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | February 3, 1998
The Maryland Senate gave final approval last night to a bill that would require public schools to teach children about the Irish potato famine.The bill passed 26-20 with no debate and goes to the House of Delegates, where its prospects are uncertain.The legislation sponsored by Sen. Perry Sfikas, a Baltimore Democrat, would require public elementary and secondary schools to teach children about a tragedy that killed 1 million of Ireland's 8 million people and set off a historic wave of immigration to the United States.
NEWS
October 28, 1998
The Baltimore SAFE KIDS Coalition and University of Maryland Medical Center are urging parents to take precautions to make sure children have a safe Halloween.Parents are being urged to accompany children who are under 10 years of age, to use light, brightly colored costumes that are more visible, to teach children not to dart into streets from between parked cars and to keep candles, lighted jack-o-lanterns, matches and lighters out of their reach.Pedestrian injuries, burns and falls account for the majority of injuries on Halloween, which safety experts say is one of the most dangerous nights of the year for children.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | November 28, 1990
Cooking is fun for kids. Even pre-schoolers enjoy stirring. With a little supervision older children can use knives, appliances and the rangetop and oven. Snack foods are ideal for beginning cooks because the results are soon ready for tasting. Here are some tips:* Have your beginning cook roll up sleeves, pull back hair, wear an apron and wash hands.* Teach children to use the right measuring tools: a glass or clear plastic liquid measuring cup for liquids; a metal or plastic dry measuring cup that's exactly the size needed for dry ingredients; standard measuring spoons for small amounts.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 8, 1998
TODAY'S PARENTS recognize the need to teach children fundamentals of savings accounts, stocks, mutual funds and so on," says Financial Planning Perspectives. "It's now as critical as teaching children work and social skills."The Institute of Financial Planners says, "Today's parents know their children must rely more and more on their own investing skills to fund retirement years instead of leaning on Social Security and employee pensions."To teach investments, start with piggy banks and savings accounts.
SPORTS
April 2, 2011
Boiling down joy to its essence is a rather simple exercise, or at least it seems that way while standing at Patterson Park's Boat Pond on a not-ready-for-prime-time spring morning. The recipe goes something like this: small child, worm, bobber, rod and reel, trout. The prelude is filled with anticipation as an adult slides a worm onto a hook, snaps on a multi-colored bobber and pulls the line tight through the guides. Big eyes follow each step, little knees jiggle, tiny fingers reach to grasp the rod. From there, it's a short walk to the edge of Boat Pond, where a brief casting lesson (attention not required)
NEWS
By Sarah Tan, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2010
When twin brothers Reid and Sam Shafley, 16, first tried to teach their younger brother Will to ride a bike, they thought it was hopeless. Will is considered to be in the autism spectrum, which makes some tasks difficult. "We had tried to teach him for many years, but we just couldn't get him to ride a bike," Reid said. Then their mother, Sue Ann Shafley, found Lose The Training Wheels, a small, nonprofit volunteer camp based in Virginia that travels around the country with a fleet of special bicycles.
NEWS
May 12, 2010
I find it sadly ironic that letter writers Kyle Lagratta and T. Griffith contributed numerous column inches to defending lacrosse and pontificating about teaching their sons respect for sport ("A culture of entitlement" and "Culture of respect missing in lacrosse, youth sports," Readers respond, May 11) but not a single word about teaching them not to physically or psychologically abuse people they purportedly love. The tragedy of Yeardley Love's death is that in this day and age, 50 years after the birth of the women's movement, fathers and mothers apparently still are not teaching their sons and daughters not to abuse the ones they love, or that no-one should ever put up with abuse from one who claims to love them.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | December 22, 2008
With Hanukkah under way and Christmas coming on Thursday, Baltomommie asked if it's really necessary to have her children write thank-you notes for holiday gifts, or whether they can just dictate their thanks or call. "I want well-mannered children who express their appreciation, but the thank-you notes are always a struggle!" Joan Grayson Cohen, a licensed clinical social worker at Jewish Community Services, says thank-you notes teach important lessons. "These include being gracious about receiving gifts and valuing the gesture of gift-giving," she wrote in an e-mail.
NEWS
By Tim Smith | August 27, 2008
On May 29, near Woodlawn Cemetery, 18-year-old Randallstown High School student Steven Parrish was stabbed and stomped to death. His murder, according to a Baltimore County prosecutor, was committed by two other teens. Mr. Parrish was days away from graduation. He was stabbed more than 50 times. As reported Aug. 19 in The Baltimore Sun, the three young men were allegedly members in a subset of the Bloods gang. Apparently the killers thought Mr. Parrish was gay, and that made them fear the gang's reputation would suffer.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the Sun | March 2, 2007
Kim Kutchins could not take her eyes off her son. She was listening to music and noticed Jack, 6, dancing along. "I thought, `You would be really good at either Irish step dance ... or the polka,'" said Kutchins, of Ellicott City. Now 8, Jack is a two-year veteran of the Polka Kids, a children's dance troupe. Although Jack participates in several sports, polka is his favorite activity. "It's a dying art," said Kutchins. "A lot of people don't even know what it is, and it's a really fun activity."
NEWS
March 19, 2000
Area schools and literacy programs seek volunteers to help children and adults to improve reading skills and to assist in related projects. Among them are: A Whole New World, the Enoch Pratt Free Library's Internet program for children ages 9 to 14. Volunteers are needed at several branches around the city to teach children how to use the Internet and e-mail. Training for volunteers will be provided. Contact: Marion Hirsch, 410-396-9940. Paul's Place Outreach Center, 1118 Ward St., in Baltimore's Pigtown neighborhood, for an after-school program including homework and training in life skills for children ages 10 to 13, weekdays from 2: 45 p.m. to 5: 30 p.m.; a "Kids Place" program with activities teaching values from 9: 30 a.m. to 12: 15 p.m. Saturdays for children ages 6 to 11; and "Learning Corner" adult literacy program, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Contributing Writer | November 15, 1992
The 7-year-old was a talented skier, having a great time on the mountain with a ski school group her own age. But that wasn't enough for her parents. They insisted the ski school put her with older, faster children."
NEWS
By Sharon Dubble | February 18, 2007
This year is being celebrated worldwide as the Montessori centenary, marking 100 years since the opening of the first Casa dei Bambini (Children's House) in the slums of Rome. In 1907, Dr. Maria Montessori had no intention of starting a school. But as a scientist and physician passionately interested in studying child development, she jumped at the opportunity to oversee a day care arrangement for children of factory workers. Her experiments and observations in that first Children's House rocked the establishment of her day and sparked a worldwide educational and social movement.
NEWS
By Douglas E. Abrams | December 24, 2006
COLUMBIA, Mo. -- With the holidays upon us, thoughts will turn soon to New Year's resolutions. More than 35 million children - nearly half the children in America - play sports each year, so plenty of parents and coaches would do well to resolve to make sports better for boys and girls in 2007. "Making sports better" means no more adults slugging one another at games for children as young as 6. No more "select" teams that cut 8-year-olds. No more adults whose zeal to win has fueled an epidemic of overuse injuries in preteens pushed too hard, too fast.
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