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By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2001
A PROPER tea party involves three things. The first, of course, is plenty of piping hot tea with sugar, milk and lemon. The second is finger food served on good china - scones, sliced cake, small sandwiches made of white bread with the crusts removed. The third, and perhaps the hardest to provide, is a relaxing atmosphere that encourages people to linger as they take a break from their daily routine. Kitty Knoedler, the genial proprietor of Petticoat Tea Room, has these elements down pat, from the assorted teas she presents to the homemade goodies served on floral china that would have been at home in any Victorian parlor to the cozy, Colonial-style tearoom overlooking the Fells Point waterfront.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The revivals keep going. Another old favorite is coming back. The Old Waverly History Exchange & Tea Room, which operated out of a Victorian frame house on 31st Street, will re-open at the end of the year in Little Italy, according to its once and future owner, Donna Beth Joy Shapiro. The new version, which will be called Old Waverly Tea Room & Academy of Home Arts, will occupy a long-shuttered commercial space on Little Italy's High Street. Shapiro, a sometime contributor to the Sun, said that her plans for the new location include a retail bakery operation, which will feature bread baked in a wood-fired brick oven, along with Old Waverly specialties like raisin scones, rosemary shortbread and rugelach, and a classroom space where she will offer home economics classes under the Academy of Home Arts name.  Shapiro said she intends to operate the bakery, cafe and academy under kosher supervision.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2003
Going to the old Hutzler's tea room is one of Alice Ann Finnerty's favorite childhood memories. Both Hutzler's and its tea room are long gone, but Finnerty wanted her 16 grandchildren -- and other folks, as well -- to have a Hutzler's-like experience. So she and daughter Kathleen Finnerty Curtis are opening their own tea room in Hampden next Tuesday, aptly named Finnerteas. The "back when" atmosphere should first hit you when you walk into the tea room. Finnerty Curtis says they wanted to make it "warm and fuzzy, like coming home."
EXPLORE
March 13, 2013
The Annual AMC Valentine Tea was held Friday, Feb. 15 at Tea by Two in Bel Air with a sellout crowd. Speaker Bob Rich from Saxon's Diamond Centers was entertaining and most informative as he shared samples of diamonds in various colors. Did you know that there are blue, yellow, brown and black diamonds? Oohs and aahs were heard throughout the tea room as samples were passed around for all to see. The Pandora Bracelet, donated by Saxon's, was a tantalizing auction item. The delicious menu for high tea was delicious and varied with lots of chocolate and fabulous teas all served in the charming atmosphere of classic table settings and decorations.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2002
Frances W. Barrett, who saw diners to their tables at a well-known department store restaurant, died Thursday of congestive heart failure at the Wesley Home in Mount Washington, the community where she lived most of her life. She was 96. A hostess at the Hutzler's department store's Colonial Tea Room in downtown Baltimore, she also ran the employees' restaurant and inaugurated a popularly priced lunch shop known as the Quixie. Born Frances Anne Winand in Baltimore, she spent her childhood on Ken Oak Road in Mount Washington.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
The check arrived Monday, pushing the Woman's Industrial Exchange's campaign over the top of an emergency $150,000 fund-raising goal to preserve one of downtown Baltimore's most cherished -- and wallpapered -- anachronisms.Over the past 19 months, the nonprofit foundation, established in 1880 "to furnish women with opportunities for financial security," passed its hat among its tea room lunch clientele, then tapped local philanthropic foundations (the Mercantile Fund's $3,500 donation took it past the goal)
NEWS
January 25, 1995
In a letter to the editor published Monday, the Old Waverly History Exchange & Tea Room was named incorrectly.The Evening Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
July 16, 1994
In yesterday's Maryland LIVE section, the Friday and Saturday hours for Ethel & Ramones Coffee and Tea Room were incorrectly listed in the restaurant review. The correct hours are 7 a.m. to midnight.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | March 7, 1995
Did you ever have a craving for a slice of the Wellesley fudge cake sold from the bake shop of Hutzler's department store?Probably the only mortals who don't are those who never tasted this long-gone version of bakery bliss.The cake is gone, as is the Hutzler Brothers Company, that local institution that seemed as if it would be immortal. Founded in 1858, it made it through to 1990 when the final going-out-of-business sale was held.The Howard and Saratoga streets stores are now state offices.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
A cup of tea, a few delicate pastries and a place to read or chat. That's what Wendy Mueller is promising with her new Victorian tea room.The tea room, in Wendy's Collectibles in Westminster, opened this week with little fanfare."
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Great conversation while dinning on delicate cucumber sandwiches. Hot, buttery scones fresh from the oven. Zesty smooth lemon curd. And don't forget the clotted cream. There's nothing like a traditional afternoon tea. Long associated with ladies of leisure, tea has experienced a resurgence in recent years at area tea rooms as people looking for a slowed-down celebration of refinement have discovered the pastime. It's not just elite, pinkie-raised women sipping on a cuppa — a new generation of women is embracing the afternoon tea as a venue for baby showers, bridal showers, gatherings of friends, and even weddings.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | July 12, 2007
Daniel D. Harvey swept the sidewalk in front of his Hampden law office yesterday - where long planks of wood and tar paper from the roof of a nearby building had amassed in a pile after a Tuesday afternoon lightning storm toppled trees and disrupted electricity to thousands. Power had been restored to most of the 19,000 residences in the city affected by the storm, according to Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. In Hampden, an area of the city especially hard-hit, people were cleaning up and marveling at the damage.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 10, 2006
Charlene Johns stood at the end of a table putting mounds of red raspberry jam, lemon curd and imported Devonshire clotted cream onto small saucers. Next she moved on to the cheddar cheese and olive spread. Beside her, Tami Everitt made lavender cookies and scones. The two women were preparing food for an English-style tea they were serving at Piccadilly's Tearoom, a Victorian tea parlor that opened four weeks ago on East Main Street in Taneytown. "I wanted this place to be America's crown jewel," said Janice Shehan, who co-owns Piccadilly's with her husband, James Shehan Jr. "I wanted an upscale English tearoom that could satisfy American women."
BUSINESS
December 9, 2006
The Association of Marketing & Communication Professionals honored two Baltimore-based marketing and public relations firms with International Creative Awards. Warschawski received 14 awards and MGH won seven awards in various categories. New provider The U.S. Office of Personnel Management approved Baltimore-based Spectra, a unit of UnitedHealth Group, as one of three providers of eye-care benefits to some 8 million government employees, retirees and dependents. New contract Redhead Cos., with headquarters in Ellicott City, has been hired by Baltimore architectural design firm Kann & Associates to handle branding, Web development and creative development and production services.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
A year after a gala reopening and an expensive building renovation, the tearoom at the Woman's Industrial Exchange will serve a last lunch today while the board that runs the historic Charles Street institution searches for a new restaurant operator. The lunchroom, at Charles and Pleasant streets within sight of the Washington Monument, has been a bastion of old Baltimore cooking since the 19th century. It was locally renowned for its dainty chicken salad and tomato aspic platters served weekdays only, but business had been poor recently.
NEWS
By Michael Anft and Michael Anft,Special to Baltimoresun.com | January 5, 2005
Not quite downtown and not quite uptown, Waverly nevertheless represents the heart of Baltimore City's geography with the style of a once-famous uncle at a family dinner. While it may not be the magnet of attention it was in decades past, the neighborhood still commands respect. [ ][ ]For years, Waverly served as the city's soul. On its eastern edge, Memorial Stadium regularly played host to 50,000 or so fans of the Colts (who played there from 1953-1983), Orioles (1954-1991) and Ravens (1996 and 1997)
BUSINESS
December 9, 2006
The Association of Marketing & Communication Professionals honored two Baltimore-based marketing and public relations firms with International Creative Awards. Warschawski received 14 awards and MGH won seven awards in various categories. New provider The U.S. Office of Personnel Management approved Baltimore-based Spectra, a unit of UnitedHealth Group, as one of three providers of eye-care benefits to some 8 million government employees, retirees and dependents. New contract Redhead Cos., with headquarters in Ellicott City, has been hired by Baltimore architectural design firm Kann & Associates to handle branding, Web development and creative development and production services.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | March 2, 2003
The past in its most decorous form is never so remote that Alice Ann Finnerty cannot touch some fragment of it daily in her Hampden consignment shops. Perhaps it's logical that she would raise her new life project on a foundation of memory. It had to be a tearoom, as Finnerty tells the story, if only to appease a persistent nostalgic impulse. She would restore some elements of a day when the Hutzler Brothers Co. meant not just a fine downtown Baltimore shopping experience, but also the prospect of enjoying an afternoon in the department store's sixth-floor restaurant, the Colonial, known also as the tearoom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2004
In 1747, a man named William Reynolds opened a tavern in Annapolis. After 257 years, the Sly Fox Pub is operating from the same building. Back in 1747, the rest of the building held a hat shop and an inn. Today, the building houses a tea room and an inn. The pub, divided into a bar area and a dining room, is on the lowest level, and it has a cozy feel, thanks to its low, pine-beamed ceilings. At our wood table, next to the large open fireplace, with candle-shaped lights flickering on the wooden shelves, it was easy to imagine we were in an earlier era. The space is both small and popular.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2004
A meal at the new tea room in Ellicott City, Tea on the Tiber, can be a lovely experience, as long as you follow the rules. The small space, on the ground floor of an interior decorating shop in the historic downtown, is charming, from the crackling fireplace in the front hall to the deep eggplant walls and elaborate china place settings on highly polished wood tables. Classical music plays, and servers drift about in black dresses with white ruffled pinafores. But patrons who think they can just wander in for a meal will be disappointed.
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