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By Ron Smith | November 18, 2010
Congressional Republicans used to enjoy the luxury of ignoring Ron Paul's cantankerous objections to the political premises they shared with their counterparts across the aisle. The question now is whether in the new Congress to be seated in January the longtime Texas representative will be allowed to chair the Subcommittee on Domestic Monetary Policy and Technology on the House Financial Services Committee. Mr. Paul is the ranking minority member now, so the job would seem to be his after the GOP sweep in the midterm election, but the Republican leadership will decide whether to give the leading critic of the Federal Reserve Bank a prominent role in overseeing the Fed itself as well as the U.S. Mint and the U.S. relationship with the World Bank.
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NEWS
By Kyle Scott | March 27, 2014
What makes the tea party movement so effective at mobilizing voters and winning elections is the same thing that may limit its effectiveness in the future: its decentralized nature. The tea party movement is politics guerrilla-style. The first thing a non-tea partier must know is that there is no single tea party; there are multiple tea parties that maintain a loose connection with one another through informal contacts or more formalized caucuses. Most tea party groups are hyper-local and get by with the efforts of volunteers and a small group of donors.
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NEWS
July 4, 2010
Two hundred and thirty-four years after the members of the Continental Congress signed the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, the question of how the founding fathers of 1776 would have governed the America of 2010 is suddenly front and center in our political discourse. A dominant view among conservatives is that the Supreme Court confirmation process underway in the Senate should turn on how closely nominee Elena Kagan hews to the doctrine of "originalism," or the belief that we must interpret the Constitution exactly as its authors understood it. The tea party movement takes its symbolism and rhetoric from the events that preceded the separation from Great Britain.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 21, 2014
The political equivalent of schoolyard bullying seems back in vogue to a degree seldom seen since the days of the late Sen. Joe McCarthy of Wisconsin, who used bare-knuckle intimidation to cow a whole country into viral anti-communism in the 1950s. Despite New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's assurance that "I am not a bully," more accounts of his strong-arm methods to get his way, strongly hinted in what's now known as Trafficgate, have cast him in that light. An even more pertinent comparison with McCarthy is being drawn by Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas.
NEWS
August 2, 2010
Doug Mainwaring's assertion that the tea party movement is "a Norman Rockwell moment in history" ("Nothing extreme about it," July 29) is a fantasy. Having personally attended a health care rally in Towson during the summer of 2008, I saw firsthand the outrageous signs and behavior of those whom Mr. Mainwaring claims represent "America at its absolute finest." The Norman Rockwell artwork that I remember from my youth did not include Hitler caricatures of American presidents.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
The time is almost upon us for all Americans who believe in limited government and individual freedoms, as envisioned by our founding fathers, to rise up and take back our country from the edge of socialism caused by the Obama administration and the liberal Democrat-led Congress. Our power is not at the end of a barrel of a gun, to which the colonists had to finally resort, but in the power of our vote at the ballot box in the upcoming elections in 2010 and in 2012. Mr. Obama and Congress have rammed economy-killing, and freedom-stifling, legislation down the throats of the American people over their objections, as well as uncontrolled continuous spending.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | March 3, 2010
Texas Gov. Rick Perry cruised to an easy victory Tuesday night in a bitterly fought GOP primary that pitted him against the state's popular U.S. senator and an insurgent running as a favorite of the tea party movement. Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison conceded less than an hour after polls closed, bringing an abrupt finish to one of the most highly anticipated contests of the 2010 primary season. The victory gives Perry plenty of time before November to unify Republicans. With nearly 70 percent of precincts reporting, Perry held 51 percent of the vote to Hutchison's 30 percent, enough to avoid an April 13 runoff.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
An organization aiming to "build the statewide liberty movement" in Maryland will host Sen. Rand Paul -- a Kentucky Republican often touted as a potential presidential candidate -- for a fundraiser next month. The Maryland Liberty PAC, run by a conservative advocate with ties to the senator's father -- former Republican congressman Ron Paul of Texas -- will host the Kentuckian in Linthicum Heights on March 26. Ticket prices run from $30 to $5,000. The group is run by Patrick McGrady, an occasional candidate for office in Maryland and a member of the Campaign for Liberty, a conservative group founded by Ron Paul that focuses on fiscal issues.
NEWS
June 6, 2011
In a recent article, a well-regarded economist states that the Social Security Administration has projected that it will collect $46 billion less in cash (i.e. FICA taxes) than it will pay out in retirement and disability benefits in fiscal year 2011. However, Social Security's revenue includes $105 billion it will get from the U.S. Treasury to cover the cost of reducing the Social Security tax on employees' wages from 6.2 percent to 4.2 percent — the so-called "two percent tax holiday.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | March 28, 2010
H i, boys and girls! As a public service, I've prepared the following statement for Republican leaders to use when some disgruntled opponent of health care reform injures somebody - or worse. Given recent reports of threats against Democratic lawmakers in the wake of last week's historic vote, that moment has come to feel inevitable. When it happens, don't you want your favorite GOP lawmaker to be ready? You can ensure that he or she is simply by clipping this statement and mailing it to them.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2014
An organization aiming to "build the statewide liberty movement" in Maryland will host Sen. Rand Paul -- a Kentucky Republican often touted as a potential presidential candidate -- for a fundraiser next month. The Maryland Liberty PAC, run by a conservative advocate with ties to the senator's father -- former Republican congressman Ron Paul of Texas -- will host the Kentuckian in Linthicum Heights on March 26. Ticket prices run from $30 to $5,000. The group is run by Patrick McGrady, an occasional candidate for office in Maryland and a member of the Campaign for Liberty, a conservative group founded by Ron Paul that focuses on fiscal issues.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | August 1, 2013
Ted Cruz is on a roll. The tea party firebrand from Texas has been in the Senate all of seven months, but he's already looking like a strong contender for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016. Last week, Mr. Cruz won a straw poll at a major gathering of the party's conservative wing in Denver with an impressive 45 percent of the votes, far ahead of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul. Before that, he wowed social conservatives in a campaign-style visit to Iowa, whose caucuses are the first stop on the long trail that leads to the nomination.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | February 8, 2013
In the Republican Party's developing effort to put on a new face after November's presidential defeat, the latest gesture is trotting out freshman Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida to deliver the GOP response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address before Congress next week. The 41-year-old Rubio, the American-born son of naturalized Cuban-American parents, will deliver his speech in English and Spanish -- in case anyone might miss the political significance in a country with a rapidly surging Hispanic population that gave 73 percent of its votes to Mr. Obama.
NEWS
By Mary Sanchez | December 30, 2012
Reports of the death of the tea party are greatly exaggerated. For about two years now, certain observers have been declaring the demise of this insurgent tendency within the Republican Party. However, despite recent headlines, we should expect to hear more from the tricorn-hat crowd, especially if they continue to raise money. The news of late suggests that establishment Republicans are staging a counterinsurgency. Speaker of the House John Boehner has removed four tea party darlings in the House from prominent committee positions.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 28, 2012
As the 2012 Republican National Convention gathers in Tampa, I find my thoughts going back nearly half a century, to San Francisco in 1964. It was the first political convention I covered as a reporter, and it was the one at which Sen. Barry Goldwater of Arizona was nominated for president. Then, as now, the air was filled with far-right conservative demands for restraints in the size and reach of government, capsulated in Goldwater's rousing call to the delegates: "I would remind you that extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 24, 2012
No recent development has underlined the decline of political party clout more than beleaguered Senate Republican nominee Todd Akin's refusal to accede to GOP leadership demands that he withdraw from his race against Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri. In spite of his asinine declaration that the female reproductive mechanism can somehow neutralize the pregnancy-creating sperm of a "legitimate" rapist, Mr. Akin has vowed to press on. He is bolstered by equally fervent anti-abortion organizations determined to show the Show Me State they are not to be denied.
NEWS
By Mary Sanchez | December 30, 2012
Reports of the death of the tea party are greatly exaggerated. For about two years now, certain observers have been declaring the demise of this insurgent tendency within the Republican Party. However, despite recent headlines, we should expect to hear more from the tricorn-hat crowd, especially if they continue to raise money. The news of late suggests that establishment Republicans are staging a counterinsurgency. Speaker of the House John Boehner has removed four tea party darlings in the House from prominent committee positions.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 25, 2012
That pop you may or may not have heard the other day was the bursting pipedream of a centrist presidential candidate outside the establishment parties. The organizers of a group calling itself Americans Elect decided to close shop after failing to find anyone who would qualify to be its standard-bearer in November. No one who met the group's eligibility requirements to become its presidential nominee was able to corral the threshold 10,000 endorsements needed from "delegates" in an online nationwide convention.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 4, 2012
The silence of the other shoe dropping pretty much describes the clamor that greeted the departure of Newt Gingrichfrom his overblown, self-centered fight for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination. The man who vowed he would go all the way to the convention slinked away at a sparsely attended farewell news conference, with yet another offering of the ersatz erudition for which he is infamous, and with an ungracious quasi-endorsement of the man who whipped him, Mitt Romney. The coming election, Mr. Gingrich noted, "is not a choice between Mitt Romney and Ronald Reagan.
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