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By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Maryland's tea party movement has welcomed a recent Republican congressional candidate and a Baltimore Democrat to its leadership ranks. Del. Curt Anderson, the Democrat who leads the Baltimore delegation, was the surprise pick for vice chairman of the otherwise solidly Republican new House tea party caucus. "Their constituency may be conservative," Anderson said, "but just as mine in Northeast Baltimore, they feel that taxes are already too high. " Charles Lollar, meanwhile, has been named director of the Maryland chapter of Americans for Prosperity.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, running for reelection in the now more Democratic Sixth District, casts himself as an “independent voice” in his first radio ad of the general election campaign. The 10-term incumbent, who was first elected to Congress in 1992, faces the toughest reelection fight of his career after Democratic lawmakers in Annapolis redrew his Western Maryland-based district to give their party a chance at a pickup. The 60-second spot, which began airing Thursday, does not mention Bartlett's party affiliation or name his Democratic challenger, Potomac banker John Delaney.
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NEWS
April 9, 2012
Things haven't gone quite according to plan in the newly redrawn 6th Congressional District. Maryland's leading Democrats figured they had drawn new boundaries that would allow a rising star in the state Senate to move up to Congress. Republicans figured that the incumbent, 85-year-old Roscoe Bartlett, would retire rather than face a tough race, leaving the door open for new candidates. But the Democrats didn't figure on John Delaney, 48, a financier who swamped the anointed favorite, Sen. Rob Garagiola, in the fundraising race and again at the polls.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
Things haven't gone quite according to plan in the newly redrawn 6th Congressional District. Maryland's leading Democrats figured they had drawn new boundaries that would allow a rising star in the state Senate to move up to Congress. Republicans figured that the incumbent, 85-year-old Roscoe Bartlett, would retire rather than face a tough race, leaving the door open for new candidates. But the Democrats didn't figure on John Delaney, 48, a financier who swamped the anointed favorite, Sen. Rob Garagiola, in the fundraising race and again at the polls.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Republican Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, running for reelection in the now more Democratic Sixth District, casts himself as an “independent voice” in his first radio ad of the general election campaign. The 10-term incumbent, who was first elected to Congress in 1992, faces the toughest reelection fight of his career after Democratic lawmakers in Annapolis redrew his Western Maryland-based district to give their party a chance at a pickup. The 60-second spot, which began airing Thursday, does not mention Bartlett's party affiliation or name his Democratic challenger, Potomac banker John Delaney.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
When Rep. Andy Harris spoke at a Cecil County senior center recently, the first slide he showed on the wall behind him was an ominous chart projecting exponential growth over the next seven decades. The slide's title: "Tidal wave of debt. " "This is a real crisis," the first-term Republican told the seniors in Elkton as he gestured toward the chart. "I didn't get sent to Washington to sit by idly while this happens. " After a months-long battle over government spending and budget deficits in Washington, Harris and Republicans nationwide are under renewed pressure from tea party and other conservative groups to take a tough stand against raising the nation's $14.3 trillion debt ceiling — even if that means risking economic turmoil.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | January 5, 2012
A year ago, the tea party movement looked like an irresistible wave sweeping through the Republican Party. Anyone who hoped to win this year's GOP presidential nomination, it seemed, would need to embrace tea party activists' stringent demands for smaller government, lower taxes and deep cuts in spending. But in Tuesday's Iowa caucuses, the three candidates who hewed closest to the tea party line - Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich - sank straight to the bottom of the pack.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
Last week, Congress approved another stopgap measure to keep the government running while Republicans and Democrats fight about how much should be cut during the current fiscal year, presaging an even tougher fight about the budget for fiscal 2012. The divided votes in the House and the Senate show that not only can't the two parties agree on a spending plan but that there's significant division within the Republican and Democratic ranks about what to do. Some Republicans aligned with the tea party voted against the budget continuation because it cuts too little, and some Democrats voted no because it cuts too much.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 17, 2011
Rep. Elijah Cummings, the veteran Democrat, tells me that some of the 87 Republican freshmen in the House of Representatives fear they may face 2012 primary challengers "even more conservative than they are. " That's why they're pushing for more cuts in spending on social and environmental programs, Mr. Cummings said. Meanwhile, Maryland's contribution to the GOP freshman class, Andy Harris, tells Nicole Gaudiano of Gannett's Washington bureau that he's considering joining the Tea Party Caucus, led by the amazing Michele "The founding fathers fought tirelessly to end slavery" Bachmann.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Dan Bongino launched his first campaign for office on a laptop computer in his dining room. His wife, alone at his side, was the only other person he was sure would vote for him. Two years later, as the Severna Park man runs for the House of Representatives in Maryland's 6th Congressional District, he has taken on something of a celebrity status. Now, when he knocks on voters' doors, he's often recognized from his appearances on Fox News or national talk radio programs. Bongino faces a daunting task in attempting to unseat Rep. John Delaney, the deep-pocketed incumbent, in a district that was redrawn in 2011 to favor Democrat s . But no matter how next year's midterm election turns out, even Bongino's adversaries acknowledge he has quickly built a powerful political brand in the state that has given him a voice in Republican politics.
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | January 5, 2012
A year ago, the tea party movement looked like an irresistible wave sweeping through the Republican Party. Anyone who hoped to win this year's GOP presidential nomination, it seemed, would need to embrace tea party activists' stringent demands for smaller government, lower taxes and deep cuts in spending. But in Tuesday's Iowa caucuses, the three candidates who hewed closest to the tea party line - Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich - sank straight to the bottom of the pack.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
When Rep. Andy Harris spoke at a Cecil County senior center recently, the first slide he showed on the wall behind him was an ominous chart projecting exponential growth over the next seven decades. The slide's title: "Tidal wave of debt. " "This is a real crisis," the first-term Republican told the seniors in Elkton as he gestured toward the chart. "I didn't get sent to Washington to sit by idly while this happens. " After a months-long battle over government spending and budget deficits in Washington, Harris and Republicans nationwide are under renewed pressure from tea party and other conservative groups to take a tough stand against raising the nation's $14.3 trillion debt ceiling — even if that means risking economic turmoil.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 17, 2011
Rep. Elijah Cummings, the veteran Democrat, tells me that some of the 87 Republican freshmen in the House of Representatives fear they may face 2012 primary challengers "even more conservative than they are. " That's why they're pushing for more cuts in spending on social and environmental programs, Mr. Cummings said. Meanwhile, Maryland's contribution to the GOP freshman class, Andy Harris, tells Nicole Gaudiano of Gannett's Washington bureau that he's considering joining the Tea Party Caucus, led by the amazing Michele "The founding fathers fought tirelessly to end slavery" Bachmann.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
Last week, Congress approved another stopgap measure to keep the government running while Republicans and Democrats fight about how much should be cut during the current fiscal year, presaging an even tougher fight about the budget for fiscal 2012. The divided votes in the House and the Senate show that not only can't the two parties agree on a spending plan but that there's significant division within the Republican and Democratic ranks about what to do. Some Republicans aligned with the tea party voted against the budget continuation because it cuts too little, and some Democrats voted no because it cuts too much.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Maryland's tea party movement has welcomed a recent Republican congressional candidate and a Baltimore Democrat to its leadership ranks. Del. Curt Anderson, the Democrat who leads the Baltimore delegation, was the surprise pick for vice chairman of the otherwise solidly Republican new House tea party caucus. "Their constituency may be conservative," Anderson said, "but just as mine in Northeast Baltimore, they feel that taxes are already too high. " Charles Lollar, meanwhile, has been named director of the Maryland chapter of Americans for Prosperity.
NEWS
July 27, 2011
I have some questions for the House Tea Party Caucus: First, how do you plan to reduce the federal debt through spending cuts alone (i.e. no revenue increases) without destroying Medicare and seriously damaging Social Security? Second, if tax increases are "job killers," then aren't spending cuts "job killers" as well? Finally, if tax cuts are "job creators," then aren't spending increases "job creators" too? So why is one of them a good thing and the other not? George Alberts, Columbia
NEWS
September 8, 2011
The Congressional tea party caucus has not and will not withhold disaster relief funds from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and tea party members have already appropriated more FEMA funds for 2012 than were originally requested. But of course, those "insignificant" facts were never mentioned in your latest editorial attempt to discredit and disparage the GOP-led U.S. House of Representatives ("Shortchanging FEMA," Sept. 5). When The Sun publishes its daily partisan half-truths, it would do well to preface them with a disclaimer: "Read the following at your own risk, as our innuendo, distortions and outright lies may actually cause your head to explode.
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