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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | April 1, 2012
"When is everything going to go back to normal?" - Roger Sterling Raise your hand if you were ready for Fat Betty? Or Don's new secretary being named Dawn? Or (what I'm guessing) is the first-ever Rolling Stones-potential-bean-commercial idea. Yeah, me either. How random was this episode? Betty was the star. So let's start with her, or "#FatBetty" as she was hashtagged immediately on Twitter. To accommodate January Jones' pregnancy while filming began on Season 5 (and probably to give her a better storyline this year)
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
Orioles manager Buck Showalter hasn't announced the winner of the team's No. 5 starter competition, but this week's pitching schedule, which was announced Saturday, would indicate that right-hander Jake Arrieta appears to be in line for the spot. Arrieta, who was initially slated to start Tuesday's game against the Twins in Fort Myers, will now pitch in a minor league game at Twin Lakes Park on the same day. Pitching prospect Kevin Gausman will now start against the Twins. Over the past few weeks, Showalter has sent most of his entrenched starters to minor league games so that they won't be overexposed facing a bevy of AL East opponents and the Twins, who is the Orioles' home opener opponent.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | November 21, 2008
The U.S. Climate Prediction Center has issued its winter outlook for Decmeber through February. The Central Plains are in line for warmer and wetter winter weather than the average. But there are no signss in the tea leaves for Maryland. Still, even an "average" winter here would mean a colder winter than we've seen since 2003, and as much snow as the past two winters combined. Got your shovel?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Sunni Gilliam does, in fact, know how to read the tea leaves. In late 2005, when a Starbucks seemed to be popping up on every block, Gilliam opened Tea-ology, an "urban tea house" in Fells Point. The name was soon changed to Teavolve, and a few years later, she opened another, larger Teavolve in an up-and-coming area called Harbor East. "We were here before Legg Mason. We were here before Four Seasons. We were here before Chazz," Gilliam said. Now, Gilliam and her fiance, Del Powell, plan to open a new Teavolve in the Hopkins BioPark in the next two months.
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | August 12, 2006
What it is -- A new line of Snapple teas made with white tea leaves What we like about it --This refreshing summer beverage boasts a third fewer calories and sugar than regular Snapple teas without sacrificing the authentic tea taste. The nectarine and raspberry flavors are nice and mild, while the green apple's slightly sour punch will leave your mouth tingling. What it costs --$1.39 Where to buy --Available at convenience and grocery stores. Per serving (8 ounces): --60 calories, 0 grams fat, 15 grams carbohydrate, 15 grams sugar, 0 grams protein, 0 grams fiber, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 15 milligrams sodium
FEATURES
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 14, 1998
Far more than just a beverage, tea is both a pleasant way to celebrate a few moments' solitude and a gracious form of hospitality extended to business associates, friends and family.A Proper Pot of TeaStart with a good-quality blend of loose tea leaves, which generally are of superior quality to tea packed in bags. Not only does the hot water circulate more effectively through loose leaves, improving flavor extraction, but loose tea is nearly always a better value for the money.Fill a china or glazed pottery teapot with boiling water and let stand.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 30, 1991
It is hard to get your tea leaves read nowadays. Most places that serve tea either use tea bags or keep the tea confined in metal balls called infusers.When these tea-making methods are used, no leaves travel to the bottom of a cup. And without tea leaves, a tea-cup reader has nothing to work with.To get a good reading of the future, I had to get some tea made from a pot where the leaves were still allowed to roam. I got my chance the other day when John Harney was in town.He was visiting from Salisbury, Conn.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
Reading election returns can be a bit like reading tea leaves -- you just might find what you want to see. Legislators who staunchly maintained that last fall's elections registered clear opposition to any tax increases now find themselves supporting a tax package that will raise $95 million in additional revenues, some for this fiscal year. Chances are these same legislators will decide that the election returns didn't signal an absolute opposition to any tax increases, just opposition to unneeded taxes and wasteful spending.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and By Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2005
For grillers, burger is king Americans are grilling fruit, vegetables and even cookies, but the latest annual Weber GrillWatch Survey finds the most popular grill food is still hamburgers. The survey released this spring found that 93 percent of the people who have grilled in the past year slapped a burger on the grate. Other popular items are hot dogs, chicken pieces, steaks and pork chops. Almost a third of the respondents said they grilled more last year than the year before. New for brews Tea lovers now can brew their tea on the go with Pacific Cornetta's new Tea-zer.
NEWS
By Sara Olkon and Sara Olkon,Tribune Newspapers | April 15, 2009
As part of a nationwide tax rebellion, protesters, in a nod to the Boston Tea Party, have been sending tea bags to their representatives. The trouble is, the tea keeps getting mistaken for a hazardous substance. In Boulder, Colo., the district office of Rep. Jared Polis recently called for help after a lumpy white envelope with no return address arrived in the mail. The Boulder Fire Department's Hazardous Materials Response Team found a tea bag and a note reading "We the People, 1773." Earlier this month in Manchester, N.H., a hazmat team descended on the office of Rep. Carol Shea-Porter after employees opened an envelope marked "tax protest" and found a bunch of tea leaves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel | April 1, 2012
"When is everything going to go back to normal?" - Roger Sterling Raise your hand if you were ready for Fat Betty? Or Don's new secretary being named Dawn? Or (what I'm guessing) is the first-ever Rolling Stones-potential-bean-commercial idea. Yeah, me either. How random was this episode? Betty was the star. So let's start with her, or "#FatBetty" as she was hashtagged immediately on Twitter. To accommodate January Jones' pregnancy while filming began on Season 5 (and probably to give her a better storyline this year)
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 26, 2010
In their never-ending quest to predict the outcome of the next congressional elections, the professional crystal-ballers peered into another blurred sphere this week after the latest round of primary elections. The conventional wisdom is that 2010 is the year of the outsider, spurred by high federal spending, high unemployment, slow economic recovery and disappointment in Washington and President Barack Obama — and that view got a boost in the Senate Republican primary in Alaska.
NEWS
May 19, 2010
When Massachusetts Republican Scott Brown scored an upset win to take the U.S. Senate seat formerly held by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. called it a highly significant event in his thinking about whether he could retake Maryland's governor's mansion. That election, coupled with GOP wins in the Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial races, made a Republican victory in blue Maryland seem a little more plausible; the electorate was clearly agitated and not playing by the conventional rules.
NEWS
By Sara Olkon and Sara Olkon,Tribune Newspapers | April 15, 2009
As part of a nationwide tax rebellion, protesters, in a nod to the Boston Tea Party, have been sending tea bags to their representatives. The trouble is, the tea keeps getting mistaken for a hazardous substance. In Boulder, Colo., the district office of Rep. Jared Polis recently called for help after a lumpy white envelope with no return address arrived in the mail. The Boulder Fire Department's Hazardous Materials Response Team found a tea bag and a note reading "We the People, 1773." Earlier this month in Manchester, N.H., a hazmat team descended on the office of Rep. Carol Shea-Porter after employees opened an envelope marked "tax protest" and found a bunch of tea leaves.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE | November 21, 2008
The U.S. Climate Prediction Center has issued its winter outlook for Decmeber through February. The Central Plains are in line for warmer and wetter winter weather than the average. But there are no signss in the tea leaves for Maryland. Still, even an "average" winter here would mean a colder winter than we've seen since 2003, and as much snow as the past two winters combined. Got your shovel?
FEATURES
By MARYANN JAMES | July 28, 2007
There are times when it's pretty clear when it's a date: One person asks, one person drives, there's a fancy dinner, maybe even some flowers. But there are times things get murky, confusing and -- worst of all -- casual. The paranoia sets in. And the question plays on loop through your head: What exactly was that afternoon in the coffee shop, that day at the museum, that night at movies? Then, you get the advice that's amazingly simple, yet all together infuriating: You just know. "I think people can pretty much tell," says 18-year-old Martique Smith.
FEATURES
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,Newsday | January 5, 2000
Once possessed of a vaguely countercultural vibe and available primarily in health-food stores and Asian markets, green tea has hit the big time. Take a trip to the supermarket, and the tea shelves are fairly bricked with bright green boxes. Lipton, Twinings and Salada, stalwarts of the tea trade, are all offering green teas. Too busy to brew your own? Snapple and Arizona Iced Tea are happy to sell you bottled green tea. Even cosmetic companies have gotten into the act: Elizabeth Arden is introducing a green-tea-scented spray and fragrance collection that promises "Exhilaration.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 12, 1992
I'm not much of a flag waver, except during the iced tea season.In the summer when the ice cubes hit the tea, I am proud to be an American.The United States of America leads the world in guzzling iced tea. Last year we, as one nation under Arthur Godfrey, washed down about 34 billion glasses of iced tea.When you divide 34 billion glasses of tea by the number of people in America, 247,818,000, and then divide that number by 365 days a year, you come with,...
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | January 24, 2007
Tea isn't just for sipping anymore. It is for baking. For roasting. It is for souping up stocks and tenderizing meat. It is for stir-frying vegetables and for marinating seafood. Tea can make a salad zing, and it can make whipped cream shine. American chefs and home cooks are learning what Asian cooks have known for centuries: Tea, whether a smoky black or a grassy green, can give surprising dimension to food without adding calories, fat or sodium. Tea is both cutting-edge and natural.
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | August 12, 2006
What it is -- A new line of Snapple teas made with white tea leaves What we like about it --This refreshing summer beverage boasts a third fewer calories and sugar than regular Snapple teas without sacrificing the authentic tea taste. The nectarine and raspberry flavors are nice and mild, while the green apple's slightly sour punch will leave your mouth tingling. What it costs --$1.39 Where to buy --Available at convenience and grocery stores. Per serving (8 ounces): --60 calories, 0 grams fat, 15 grams carbohydrate, 15 grams sugar, 0 grams protein, 0 grams fiber, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 15 milligrams sodium
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