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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
If he was always billed as "James" Stewart, why did movie lovers know him as Jimmy? James jibed better with his ethical authority and physical height (6 feet, 31/2 inches), but Jimmy suited the actor's down-home casualness and emotional transparency, his soft-shoe timing and his uncanny knack for spontaneous comedy- drama. He let audiences see right through him. Stewart could be a master of ingratiating wool-gathering. But he could also cut and sting. Few have approached the rage and anguish Stewart fearlessly plumbed in films such as "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
"Fragments" is a movie-lover's feast made up of hors d'oeuvres. This hour-and-50-minute program, airing on TCM at 8 p.m. Sunday, showcases restored fragments of lost movies — or restored trailers — that are sometimes amazing, frequently amusing and rarely less than fascinating. The best parts of "Fragments" make most contemporary movies seem pale and timid by comparison.The original "It Girl," Clara Bow, in the ruddy palette of circa-1928 Technicolor, is almost alarmingly alluring.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
"Fragments" is a movie-lover's feast made up of hors d'oeuvres. This hour-and-50-minute program, airing on TCM at 8 p.m. Sunday, showcases restored fragments of lost movies — or restored trailers — that are sometimes amazing, frequently amusing and rarely less than fascinating. The best parts of "Fragments" make most contemporary movies seem pale and timid by comparison.The original "It Girl," Clara Bow, in the ruddy palette of circa-1928 Technicolor, is almost alarmingly alluring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
If he was always billed as "James" Stewart, why did movie lovers know him as Jimmy? James jibed better with his ethical authority and physical height (6 feet, 31/2 inches), but Jimmy suited the actor's down-home casualness and emotional transparency, his soft-shoe timing and his uncanny knack for spontaneous comedy- drama. He let audiences see right through him. Stewart could be a master of ingratiating wool-gathering. But he could also cut and sting. Few have approached the rage and anguish Stewart fearlessly plumbed in films such as "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 20, 1997
At a glance TCM pays tribute to the late Red Skelton, a movie star long before he became a hit on TV, with a 24-hour marathon (6 a.m. today-6 a.m. tomorrow):"I Dood It!" (a remake of Buster Keaton's "Spite Marriage"), with Eleanor Powell and Lena Horne (9 a.m.); "Ship's Ahoy," a ship-board variety show from 1942, with Eleanor Powell, Bert Lahr and Frank Sinatra (1 p.m.); "Whistling In Brooklyn," with Ann Rutherford, which has him pitching against the Dodgers (3 p.m.); "Merton of the Movies," with Gloria Grahame (8 p.m.)
NEWS
By chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 31, 2009
No Hollywood star has ever exuded more self-confidence onscreen than Burt Lancaster - or seemed to enjoy being in front of the camera more. Tall and athletic, with a killer smile and a staccato speaking style that became fodder for impressionists the world over, Lancaster was every inch the star. All that, and he was a pretty good actor, too, especially when the role either allowed his passion to emerge full-throttle or demanded that he keep it firmly under control. Tonight's TCM schedule offers four chances to see Lancaster at his best.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1996
Disney, Schmisney. Tonight, the real "Hunchback(s) of Notre Dame" come(s) to TCM."Unsolved Mysteries" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Segments include a look at the case of Nancy Manni, who drowned while a student at the Harry Lundeberg School of Seamanship in Piney Point, Md. NBC."The X-Files" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Are gargoyles coming to life and turning murderous? Could be Fox."Firing Line" (9 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Debate centers on whether corporate downsizing is a question of greed or of survival and prosperity.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | August 5, 1997
Getting the girl. Getting the laugh. Getting the upper hand. Regardless of what he was after, Cary Grant always made getting it look so easy.TCM kicks off a 22-film Cary Grant retrospective tonight with two films he made with the master, Alfred Hitchcock: "North By Northwest" (8 p.m.), in which he gets famously strafed by an airplane, and "To Catch a Thief" (10: 30 p.m.), in which he gets Grace Kelly (lucky guy).Hitchcock no doubt took pleasure in taking a popular favorite like Grant and putting him in peril or making him a little unsavory.
FEATURES
March 1, 2001
Once again, it's time for "31 Days of Oscar" on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Academy Award nominees and winners will be shown throughout March - a total of 346 films. Tonight's prime-time lineup begins at 8 p.m. with "Paper Moon" (1973), which made Tatum O'Neal a winner for her performance with real-life dad Ryan O'Neal. It's followed at 10 by 1943's "For Whom the Bell Tolls." At a glance "Gilmore Girls" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) - Lorelai's ex - and Rory's father - speeds back into town on his motorcycle.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- Turner Classic Movies is unveiling six "lost" films from the RKO library. Caught up in a legal tangle that involved King Kong creator Merian C. Cooper and then largely forgotten, the films haven't been seen in some 50 years. TCM will air the vintage collection, which includes the 1933 William Powell melodrama Double Harness as well as Rafter Romance, One Man's Journey, Stingaree, Living on Love and A Man to Remember, tomorrow and April 11. The search for the films began last April, when a viewer wanted to know why TCM had never shown Double Harness.
NEWS
By chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | January 31, 2009
No Hollywood star has ever exuded more self-confidence onscreen than Burt Lancaster - or seemed to enjoy being in front of the camera more. Tall and athletic, with a killer smile and a staccato speaking style that became fodder for impressionists the world over, Lancaster was every inch the star. All that, and he was a pretty good actor, too, especially when the role either allowed his passion to emerge full-throttle or demanded that he keep it firmly under control. Tonight's TCM schedule offers four chances to see Lancaster at his best.
FEATURES
By Robert W. Butler and Robert W. Butler,McClatchy-Tribune | June 4, 2007
Homosexuals have always played a creative role in Hollywood. But gay stories almost never made it to celluloid. Or did they? Tonight, Turner Classic Movies cable channel begins Screened Out, an ambitious series on how American movies from 1912 to 1970 dealt with homosexuality. Forty-four films, ranging from rarely seen silent features to mainstream hits, will be shown starting at 8 Monday and Wednesday nights throughout June. "What people don't realize is that 77 years ago homosexual themes were considered viable enough to be part of mainstream entertainment," said Richard Barrios, whose 2005 book Screened Out is the basis for the series.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 3, 2007
HOLLYWOOD -- Turner Classic Movies is unveiling six "lost" films from the RKO library. Caught up in a legal tangle that involved King Kong creator Merian C. Cooper and then largely forgotten, the films haven't been seen in some 50 years. TCM will air the vintage collection, which includes the 1933 William Powell melodrama Double Harness as well as Rafter Romance, One Man's Journey, Stingaree, Living on Love and A Man to Remember, tomorrow and April 11. The search for the films began last April, when a viewer wanted to know why TCM had never shown Double Harness.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2002
Charles Chaplin and Adolf Hitler were born in the same week of April 1889. Both proved to be great communicators (although Chaplin worked better without sound, while Hitler's famously demagogic speeches sort of depended on it), and both achieved worldwide fame. In actuality, those aren't a lot of points of comparison. And it is unlikely the two would be mentioned in the same breath, save for Chaplin's decision in 1938 to mock the sadistic German fuehrer in his first talking film, The Great Dictator.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 1, 2001
Turner Classic Movies celebrates the first and still greatest of all Hollywood curmudgeons this month with a 24-film tribute to W.C. Fields. Born William Claude Dukenfeld on Jan. 29, 1880 in Philadelphia (contrary to popular legend, his tombstone does not read "I'd rather be here than in Philadelphia"), Fields was already a success in vaudeville and on Broadway by the time sound films came along. He proved a natural for the medium. His exaggerated drawl, bulbous features (largely the result of a long-standing infatuation with the bottle)
FEATURES
March 1, 2001
Once again, it's time for "31 Days of Oscar" on Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Academy Award nominees and winners will be shown throughout March - a total of 346 films. Tonight's prime-time lineup begins at 8 p.m. with "Paper Moon" (1973), which made Tatum O'Neal a winner for her performance with real-life dad Ryan O'Neal. It's followed at 10 by 1943's "For Whom the Bell Tolls." At a glance "Gilmore Girls" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) - Lorelai's ex - and Rory's father - speeds back into town on his motorcycle.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
Judy Garland would have turned 75 today, and TCM reminds us why her life is worth celebrating."Sea World and Busch Gardens Adventures: Alien Vacation!" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Rodney Dangerfield and Dave Coulier are aliens (tell us something we don't know) who visit Earth to watch how we interact with the animals! What an amazing coincidence that they land in a theme park! Lucky for us, there are plenty of celebrities on hand -- R&B group All-4-One, country singer Bryan White, ice skater Michelle Kwan -- to help keep the hour moving along!
FEATURES
February 27, 1998
Happy 66th, Liz.The celebration for Elizabeth Taylor goes on all day and all night on TCM, with plenty of outstanding titles along the way. (And they're being shown in essentially chronological order.) First, from 1944, it's 12-year-old Elizabeth in "National Velvet" (6 a.m.-8: 05 a.m.). In the evening, the selections include "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958) at 8 p.m., followed by her Oscar-winning turn in "Butterfield 8" (1960) at 10 p.m. and "Suddenly Last Summer" (1959) at midnight.At a glance"Candid Camera" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 13, 2001
Marion Davies' acting career was torpedoed by two men, neither of whom meant to do her any harm. As evidenced by "Captured on Film: The True Story of Marion Davies," a documentary premiering at 8 p.m. tomorrow on TCM, Davies was a talented, expressive actress who particularly shone in comedic roles; a vibrant personality who loved mimicking her fellow Hollywood stars (who rarely seemed to mind); and a solid performer who made any picture she was in that much better. Not that popular film culture has recorded any of that.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1998
Poised on the brink of bankruptcy, about to witness the disintegration of a dream his father had nurtured for nearly two decades, Carl Laemmle Jr. turned to the most unlikely of saviors -- a dead guy with a thirst for blood.Sixty-eight years later, that decision still haunts the world. In a good way.By giving the go-ahead to a film adaptation of "Dracula," Laemmle, the head of Universal Studios, did more than just keep his creditors at bay (at least until 1936, when mounting debts forced the studio's sale)
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