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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The math is daunting: More than 2,300 pages of prose winnowed down to 190, including photographs and the occasional blank sheet that signals chapter breaks. Yet, that's exactly the challenge that author and historian Taylor Branch tackled when he condensed his three-part history of the U.S. civil rights movement into one slender volume that could be taught in the nation's classrooms. Never mind that Branch, now 66, devoted more than 25 years of his life to crafting his acclaimed trilogy.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
HBO's Martin Luther King miniseries is going to have a strong Baltimore flavor with David Simon confirming Wednesday that he will be involved in the project based on the books of Baltimore author Taylor Branch. Deadline.com first reported Simon's involvement in the project as speculation today, with Mike Fleming Jr. writing , "I'm hearing that David Simon , the architect of the HBO series The Wire, Homicide and most recently Treme , will spearhead the HBO six-hour miniseries adaptation of America: In The King Years , based on the celebrated book trilogy by Pulitzer Prize-winner Taylor Branch.
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By From staff reports | May 1, 2008
Taylor Branch, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of an acclaimed trilogy on the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., will receive the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement, organizers announced this week. The Dayton Literacy Peace Prize was founded in 2006 to honor writers whose work "uses the power of literature to foster peace, social justice and global understanding." Previous honorees include authors Studs Terkel and Elie Wiesel. "I'm thrilled to be in that company," Branch said yesterday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
For the first time this spring, students who want to take a class at the University of Baltimore with a Pulitzer Prize-winning civil rights historian won't be bound by the university they chose to attend. The class, taught by local author Taylor Branch, is the University System of Maryland's first crack at offering an online, credit course for students from any of the system's 14 institutions, including Coppin, Towson and the University of Maryland, College Park. They will be able to communicate and interact in real time with classmates and with Branch, best known for writing the trilogy "America in the King Years.
NEWS
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 18, 1998
"Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963-65," by Taylor Branch. Simon and Schuster. 746 pages. $30.Ever since Ronald Reagan came to power nearly 20 years ago, conservatives have taken a certain ribald delight in ridiculing the 1960s as the decade of the spoliation of America, 10 years of endless pot parties, flag-desecration, sexual abandon, and other assorted debaucheries.Such simplistic caricatures are now decisively put to rest by the gifted Baltimore writer Taylor Branch in this much-anticipated second volume of a trilogy that began 10 years ago with the publication of his magisterial "Parting the Waters."
FEATURES
By Kenneth R. Bazinet and Thomas M. DeFrank and Kenneth R. Bazinet and Thomas M. DeFrank,NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | August 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - Former President Bill Clinton will write his $10 million memoir himself but has quietly lined up some high-powered talent to help with the manuscript, according to Clinton's publisher. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Taylor Branch of Baltimore has agreed to assist Clinton, who is a long-time friend of Branch's. The personal connection between Branch, who lives in Mount Washington, and the former president stems to the 1972 presidential campaign of George McGovern. As 25-year-old activists, they shared an apartment in Austin, Texas, with Clinton's girlfriend, Hillary, fund-raising and drumming up votes for the Democratic candidate.
FEATURES
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | November 9, 1990
IT'S NOT THAT PRIDE makes you swell up," Taylor Branch said last night at Johns Hopkins University, "it makes you blind."Speaking on "The Riddle of Moses: Blacks and Jews in America," the Baltimore-based historian said it was ethnic and cultural pride that ultimately broke the bond of Jews and blacks in the waning days of the civil rights movement. This break ushered in the current American era of so many "atomized" groups whose only shared bond is that each looks after its own interests at the expense of a greater social good.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2000
Imagine being a vital cog in the wheel of a national political movement at age 18 -- and risking your life to do it. That's what the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. asked of thousands of young people in the 1960s civil rights movement. It's also what author and historian Taylor Branch asked of hundreds of Howard County students yesterday during a talk at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School called "Why Should I Care About Martin Luther King?" Making King's message of nonviolent protest and activism relevant to students is sometimes a challenge, especially when some young people are bored with the idea of discussing the slain leader, Branch acknowledged.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2000
Imagine being a vital cog in the wheel of a national political movement at age 18 -- and risking your life to do it. That's what the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. asked of thousands of young people in the 1960s civil rights movement. It's also what author and historian Taylor Branch asked of hundreds of Howard County students yesterday during a talk at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School called "Why Should I Care About Martin Luther King?" Making King's message of nonviolent protest and activism relevant to students is sometimes a challenge, especially when some young people are bored with the idea of discussing the slain leader, Branch acknowledged.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
For his class assignment, Damian Pitts reluctantly attended a Jewish bar mitzvah in Park Heights. He was pleasantly surprised."They made me feel at ease, even though I was six-four and black and stood out like a sore thumb," the Goucher College junior from Laurel said last week.Having a black student visit a Jewish synagogue is par for the courses taught at Goucher this year by Taylor Branch. Author of two critically acclaimed books on the civil rights movement of the 1960s, Branch is trying to impart his passion for the subject to a new generation -- one for whom the era is ancient history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013
Local authors share the titles they're enjoying right now. Madison Smartt Bell, whose most recent novel is "The Color of Night": "Noble Savages," by Napoleon Chagnon, back to back with "Triste Tropiques" by Claude Levi-Strauss. Sort of a bookend pair of anthropology texts, both fascinating. "Les Cloches de la Bresilienne," a magical mystery by Haitian author Gary Victor. I have a project with some other people to publish this book in the U.S. Jessica Anya Blau, author of the forthcoming "The Wonder Bread Summer": I'm reading "Beautiful Ruins" by Jess Walter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
The math is daunting: More than 2,300 pages of prose winnowed down to 190, including photographs and the occasional blank sheet that signals chapter breaks. Yet, that's exactly the challenge that author and historian Taylor Branch tackled when he condensed his three-part history of the U.S. civil rights movement into one slender volume that could be taught in the nation's classrooms. Never mind that Branch, now 66, devoted more than 25 years of his life to crafting his acclaimed trilogy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2011
Thanks to the Maryland Film Festival, it ought to get good and loud and even lyrical at Station North this Thursday through Sunday with a vital, eclectic slate of music-oriented movies. Alice Donut, for a quarter-century a bulwark of Baltimore's underground rock scene, rockets into above-ground view with "Freaks in Love. " "Everyday Sunshine: The Story of Fishbone" should set audiences bobbing to the punk-pop-rock-funk sounds of Los Angeles' favorite sextet. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director Marin Alsop will present "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly" — with its galvanizing Ennio Morricone score — to dramatize the operatic glory of inspired movie music.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2011
Nonviolence, a potent force in the 1960s fight for civil rights, has become an "embarrassment, an instrument of the weak," lamented Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch. Seated in a wing chair Sunday afternoon in the chancel of First and Franklin Presbyterian Church in Mount Vernon, the author described how the strategy has fallen from favor. The Atlanta-born Branch, the son of a dry cleaner, wrote three books on the life of civil rights leader the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. He was later invited by President Bill Clinton for a series of lengthy interviews at the White House for a work on Clinton's presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2010
When conductor Marin Alsop won a MacArthur "genius" award, she was in the throes of the most serious crisis of her career. And the very public vote of confidence that the award provided gave her the boost she needed to face down her naysayers For author and historian Taylor Branch, the financial windfall meant he no longer had to work quite as many part-time jobs to support his family during the 24 years it took him to complete his trilogy about...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
George Soros, one of the richest men on the planet, has given more than $8 billion to charities in Baltimore and around the world. Last week, he made headlines with one of his biggest gifts ever — $100 million to the Human Rights Watch. The billionaire investor and philanthropist is known for supporting liberal causes, and the Human Rights Watch donation is aimed at expanding the advocacy group's geographic reach and donor base. In Baltimore, Soros also is known for opening an Open Society Institute office more than a decade ago to study the causes of persistent poverty and invest in solutions.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun Reporter | January 9, 2007
Taylor Branch rested the folk guitar in his lap and ran his fingers across its strings as sunbeams streaked through a dining-room window in his Mount Washington home, bathing his creviced face and white hair. Earlier, Branch had displayed the range of his singing voice, a silky baritone as captivating as the favorite soloist in the church choir. The Baltimore resident admitted his guitar playing wasn't as polished. Still, his gentle strokes sounded like a smooth introduction to a classic folk song.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
They met as token Southerners at a conclave of anti-war activists at Martha's Vineyard in 1969, and connected in Austin in 1972 as co-runners of the Texas campaign for the George McGovern-Sargent Shriver ticket. They were white men with formal educations from top schools and real educations forged in the racial turmoil and righteous protest that engulfed the Deep South throughout their childhood and adolescence. But they hadn't spoken for 20 years. So when Taylor Branch, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning civil-rights history "Parting the Waters," spent 1992's election night in Little Rock, Ark., and heard his old political pal Bill Clinton issue "a clarion call for our country to face the challenges of the end of the Cold War and the beginning of the next century," he never expected so much as a phone call.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 27, 2009
They met as token Southerners at a conclave of anti-war activists at Martha's Vineyard in 1969, and connected in Austin in 1972 as co-runners of the Texas campaign for the George McGovern-Sargent Shriver ticket. They were white men with formal educations from top schools and real educations forged in the racial turmoil and righteous protest that engulfed the Deep South throughout their childhood and adolescence. But they hadn't spoken for 20 years. So when Taylor Branch, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning civil-rights history "Parting the Waters," spent 1992's election night in Little Rock, Ark., and heard his old political pal Bill Clinton issue "a clarion call for our country to face the challenges of the end of the Cold War and the beginning of the next century," he never expected so much as a phone call.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | May 1, 2008
Taylor Branch, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of an acclaimed trilogy on the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., will receive the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Lifetime Achievement, organizers announced this week. The Dayton Literacy Peace Prize was founded in 2006 to honor writers whose work "uses the power of literature to foster peace, social justice and global understanding." Previous honorees include authors Studs Terkel and Elie Wiesel. "I'm thrilled to be in that company," Branch said yesterday.
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