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Taye Diggs

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lola Ogunnaike and By Lola Ogunnaike,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 13, 2002
Though it may be difficult for many to believe, Taye Diggs didn't always have matinee-idol looks. Growing up in Rochester, N.Y., he was plagued with an assortment of problems -- bad clothes, dorky glasses, a spastic personality. In short, he was a nerd. "I didn't fit in, could never get the girl that I wanted," says Diggs, 30, who was often teased because of his dark skin. In fact, it wasn't until he attended the High School of the Arts in Rochester that Diggs' social life started to pick up. There, he says, "It didn't matter how much money you had, it didn't matter how you looked.
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 2, 2006
SANAA LATHAN DOESN'T MAKE MANY MOVIES, -- only five since 2000, and one of them just used her voice -- and that's OK by her. Not only does the 34-year-old Yale-trained New York native not feel pressured to be onscreen all the time -- she'd rather choose her projects carefully, opting for quality over quantity -- but such selectivity gives her the chance to return to her first love, the stage. In 2004, she starred opposite Sean Combs in a revival of A Raisin in the Sun, and was nominated for a Tony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2004
No one believes it, but I was kind of very thin, very insecure, big glasses. -- Taye Diggs, star of UPN's new drama Kevin Hill
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
In the movie version of Rent, Rosario Dawson - as exotic dancer Mimi - and Tracie Thoms as Joanne - the lawyer lover of a bisexual performance artist and drama queen - are sensational. They're attention-getters in the best sense. When Dawson slinks down the steps of a strip club or Thoms belts out her outrage at her partner's wandering eye, they fuse their avidity for performing with the passion of characters who, for different reasons, just have to make a scene. But even these breakout actors can't break away from the mawkishness of this East Village version of La Boheme, played on the big screen as a late-'80s period piece.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
If it were possible to root for a movie, "The Wood" would deserve it, for what it aspires to be: a sweet, funny, coming-of-age film with likable African-American characters.For significant portions of the film, "The Wood" hits its target, but it ultimately misses enough to leave its audience slightly unsatisfied.To his credit, director Rick Famuyiwa, in his feature debut, has crafted a film that is largely grounded in reality, as opposed to other films of its genre -- say, for instance, "How to Be a Player" or the infamous "Booty Call."
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
In some respects, there's a lot of familiarity attached to "The Best Man," Malcolm Lee's directorial debut.For one thing, it's the second film in three months to be centered on an African-American wedding, using flashbacks and with Taye Diggs, as he was in "The Wood," cast in a central role.And Malcolm, who shares a last name and career with his older cousin Spike, borrows from his famous relative for scenes that will strike a chord of deja vu with filmgoers.But "The Best Man" is a markedly more sophisticated piece of filmmaking than "The Wood" and is touched with a sweetness and a sense of humanity that has been missing from just about everything Spike Lee has done recently this side of "Crooklyn."
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
In the movie version of Rent, Rosario Dawson - as exotic dancer Mimi - and Tracie Thoms as Joanne - the lawyer lover of a bisexual performance artist and drama queen - are sensational. They're attention-getters in the best sense. When Dawson slinks down the steps of a strip club or Thoms belts out her outrage at her partner's wandering eye, they fuse their avidity for performing with the passion of characters who, for different reasons, just have to make a scene. But even these breakout actors can't break away from the mawkishness of this East Village version of La Boheme, played on the big screen as a late-'80s period piece.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 2, 2006
SANAA LATHAN DOESN'T MAKE MANY MOVIES, -- only five since 2000, and one of them just used her voice -- and that's OK by her. Not only does the 34-year-old Yale-trained New York native not feel pressured to be onscreen all the time -- she'd rather choose her projects carefully, opting for quality over quantity -- but such selectivity gives her the chance to return to her first love, the stage. In 2004, she starred opposite Sean Combs in a revival of A Raisin in the Sun, and was nominated for a Tony.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 2004
In a TV universe of overweight, idiot, beer-swilling dads and rude, oversexed, young single men, the arrival tonight of Kevin Hill (Taye Diggs) in a new UPN drama of the same name is indeed a blessed event. Hill is a high-powered entertainment attorney and ladies' man who, when his cousin unexpectedly dies, suddenly finds himself caring for an infant girl. Diggs' smooth and winning performance reinvigorates the well-worn premise, while his physical grace adds a welcome dimension to the ham-fisted, knucklehead portrayals of masculinity that dominate prime-time TV (Think Kevin James as Doug Heffernan in The King of Queens)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 9, 2004
On any given Friday, their names turn up on the posters at the neighborhood cineplex - at the bottom, billed well after the stars. They're the cop mistakenly tracking down the hero, the good-looking eye candy in the middle of an ensemble, a victim or the heroine's love interest. Unless, of course, they find a home in an indie drama or comedy. Then, they're the lead, the star. Maybe even a producer, because their name, such as it is, got the movie financed and released. They are the nonleading leading men, movie stars with the talent and good looks to be top-billed but who don't necessarily choose to go that route.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2004
No one believes it, but I was kind of very thin, very insecure, big glasses. -- Taye Diggs, star of UPN's new drama Kevin Hill
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 2004
In a TV universe of overweight, idiot, beer-swilling dads and rude, oversexed, young single men, the arrival tonight of Kevin Hill (Taye Diggs) in a new UPN drama of the same name is indeed a blessed event. Hill is a high-powered entertainment attorney and ladies' man who, when his cousin unexpectedly dies, suddenly finds himself caring for an infant girl. Diggs' smooth and winning performance reinvigorates the well-worn premise, while his physical grace adds a welcome dimension to the ham-fisted, knucklehead portrayals of masculinity that dominate prime-time TV (Think Kevin James as Doug Heffernan in The King of Queens)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 9, 2004
On any given Friday, their names turn up on the posters at the neighborhood cineplex - at the bottom, billed well after the stars. They're the cop mistakenly tracking down the hero, the good-looking eye candy in the middle of an ensemble, a victim or the heroine's love interest. Unless, of course, they find a home in an indie drama or comedy. Then, they're the lead, the star. Maybe even a producer, because their name, such as it is, got the movie financed and released. They are the nonleading leading men, movie stars with the talent and good looks to be top-billed but who don't necessarily choose to go that route.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lola Ogunnaike and By Lola Ogunnaike,Knight Ridder / Tribune | October 13, 2002
Though it may be difficult for many to believe, Taye Diggs didn't always have matinee-idol looks. Growing up in Rochester, N.Y., he was plagued with an assortment of problems -- bad clothes, dorky glasses, a spastic personality. In short, he was a nerd. "I didn't fit in, could never get the girl that I wanted," says Diggs, 30, who was often teased because of his dark skin. In fact, it wasn't until he attended the High School of the Arts in Rochester that Diggs' social life started to pick up. There, he says, "It didn't matter how much money you had, it didn't matter how you looked.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1999
In some respects, there's a lot of familiarity attached to "The Best Man," Malcolm Lee's directorial debut.For one thing, it's the second film in three months to be centered on an African-American wedding, using flashbacks and with Taye Diggs, as he was in "The Wood," cast in a central role.And Malcolm, who shares a last name and career with his older cousin Spike, borrows from his famous relative for scenes that will strike a chord of deja vu with filmgoers.But "The Best Man" is a markedly more sophisticated piece of filmmaking than "The Wood" and is touched with a sweetness and a sense of humanity that has been missing from just about everything Spike Lee has done recently this side of "Crooklyn."
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
If it were possible to root for a movie, "The Wood" would deserve it, for what it aspires to be: a sweet, funny, coming-of-age film with likable African-American characters.For significant portions of the film, "The Wood" hits its target, but it ultimately misses enough to leave its audience slightly unsatisfied.To his credit, director Rick Famuyiwa, in his feature debut, has crafted a film that is largely grounded in reality, as opposed to other films of its genre -- say, for instance, "How to Be a Player" or the infamous "Booty Call."
TRAVEL
May 2, 2010
National Train Day Where: Union Station, 50 Massachussetts Ave. N.E., Washington When: Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. What: The third annual celebration of all things train, but train travel in particular. The event commemorates the anniversary of the "golden spike" that joined the 1,776 miles of the Central pacific and Union Pacific railways and created the first transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. There are free events in several U.S. cities, including at Union Station in Washington, where actor Taye Diggs, the spokesperson for National Train Day, will meet and greet the public.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 18, 2003
What happens when a fish out of water doesn't even realize he's a fish? Such is the unrecognized quandary facing young Brad Gluckman, a privileged Malibu teen who sees himself as the rap-master bad boy of California's Gold Coast. Not only is he way too white and way too rich to have much in the way of street cred; he's also just about the world's worst rapper. But none of that matters to the genially oblivious Brad - or B-Rad, as he'd rather be known - who's talked the talk for far too long to let anything get in the way of the soft-core gangsta persona he's built for himself in the 'Bu. Malibu's Most Wanted mines a well-worn comedic vein, but does so with a consistent good humor and surprisingly deft touch.
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