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By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Attention, residents of Bolton Hill and South Charles Village: The special taxing district you wanted, to pay for better private security and sanitation, is in deep trouble in the legislature.But there is hope, albeit slim. Another measure, a citywide bill that would allow such special districts to supplement municipal services, is still alive -- for the time being.Although the House approved the South Charles Village legislation two weeks ago, the Senate has not considered it. And the Bolton Hill measure has yet to receive even a committee hearing in either chamber.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
The Howard County Council is being asked to take a fresh look at an old - and much-debated - tax issue. A bill prefiled at the request of County Executive Ken Ulman seeks to end the two-tiered fire tax and replace it with a single countywide rate. Howard is the only Maryland county to have two tax rates to fund fire service, Ulman said, and most counties don't levy a separate tax for fire and rescue services, funding them through general revenues. The bill will be formally introduced to the County Council at a legislative session March 5, with a public hearing scheduled for March 19. Ulman said he hopes the measure will be adopted quickly so that it can be part of planning for the next fiscal year's budget.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1998
The Anne Arundel County Council considered last night laying out a welcome mat for developers of a proposed mall and entertainment center in Hanover, discussing a zoning change and the creation of taxing districts that would ease the way for the project.The council, by a vote of 6 to 0 (one member was absent) approved a special taxing district and the issuing of $28 million in bonds. Most of the revenue would pay for building a new interchange on the Baltimore-Washington Parkway and widening the roadway.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Phillip McGowan and Justin Fenton and Phillip McGowan,Sun Reporters | March 25, 2008
For years, residents of waterfront Riviera Beach have paid about $100 in extra annual taxes for their Anne Arundel County community's shoreline, money that has funded everything from dredging projects and bulkhead repairs to fixing the damage from Tropical Storm Isabel. But in recent months, some residents have started questioning how this little-known special tax district has been managing its money. They have focused on a project that was never put out to competitive bid, even as its costs nearly doubled from the original estimate.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
WHEN LEGISLATION authorizing a special taxing district for Charles Village was debated a decade ago, opponents raised fears about Baltimore's "balkanization" -- a situation in which wealthier neighborhoods would pay for enhanced services, and poorer ones would be left to fend for themselves. Not only hasn't that happened -- after the Charles Village Community Benefits District was established in 1994, only one additional neighborhood taxing district was created, in Midtown -- but the benefits district faces a nasty revolt from within its ranks.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
IT SEEMED like a perfect match of a desire and a willingness to accommodate it. Influential developers John Paterakis and C. William Struever wanted more security and street-sweeping for their properties at Inner Harbor East and at the old Allied Signal site and other parts of Fells Point. The Downtown Partnership, with more than a decade of experience providing such services to the central business district, was agreeable to extending its reach. And state legislators representing the city's waterfront shepherded through bills to expand the boundaries of the partnership's authority to impose a tax surcharge.
NEWS
September 22, 1995
RESIDENTS OF the Crofton taxing district who don't want to build an addition to their town hall if other neighboring community groups will be able to use the facility are looking pretty small.Most everyone in the western Anne Arundel community acknowledges something must be done about the town hall because it is not accessible to the handicapped. Prevented by the U.S. Americans with Disabilities Act from holding meetings at the hall, Crofton now uses other facilities that are accessible.Meetings, however, are not the only problem.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1995
Another large swath of Baltimore could have a special tax to pay for private security patrols and street sweepers under a bill introduced last night before the City Council.The proposed special taxing district in the city's midtown area could become the third in the city in the past three years -- and would link similar districts in the downtown business section and Charles Village area.Its boundaries are roughly Centre Street on the south, 20th Street on the north, the Jones Falls Expressway on the East and Howard Street and Eutaw Place on the west.
NEWS
May 4, 1993
A recent survey of merchants in historic Ellicott City has concluded that, above all else, what the quaint row of shops needs is more -- guess what? -- parking. What other revelations will surface we can only imagine.Anyone who has ever ventured into the cozy environs of the original Ellicott City knows full well how difficult it is to park there. Civic leaders have been saying that for years.Still, merchants seem quite happy that their poll reveals what everyone knew anyway. Indeed, they've been positively energized by what they've discovered.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
County residents who debated Del. Donald B. Elliott's initiative to expand the Board of County Commissioners at a public hearing yesterday reached consensus on only one point: Most are unhappy with the current three-member county commission.The county General Assembly delegation's annual session to hear public comment on local legislative proposals attracted about 75 people, a relatively high turnout. Many came to debate legislation to authorize creation of a special taxing district for Lineboro.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2005
Baltimore's planning commission enthusiastically endorsed plans yesterday for a publicly financed convention center hotel, saying that without it, the city won't stay competitive in the convention business. In the first in a series of public hearings on the hotel, to be developed and owned by the city, the commission unanimously approved bills that would create a property tax district for the hotel, authorize the sale of revenue bonds to pay for it and close streets for its construction.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2003
No one could have persuaded Flo Rivelis - normal, non-wacky Flo Rivelis - to cruise along in the zany Charles Village parade yesterday and draw attention to herself. So her family tricked her into it. Lured into a black convertible under the guise of driving to a good spot to watch the fun, Rivelis, 75, ended up near the front of the long line of beehive-wearing scooter riders, waving dog-walkers, tin-can musicians and others celebrating both city life and the momentary sense of stardom.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
A special taxing district in Charles Village was earnestly defended -- and attacked -- last night in a City Council committee hearing on the future of the North Baltimore urban experiment. Grenville B. Whitman, a resident who has led a crusade against the Charles Village Community Benefits District, told the Urban Affairs Committee that its accomplishments in fighting crime and grime in the district's 100 square blocks are illusory -- not real. Whitman -- who took pictures on Memorial Day to document trash in neighborhood alleys -- told the committee and other council members attending the session, "The benefits district could close up tomorrow and no one would really notice."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2003
WHEN LEGISLATION authorizing a special taxing district for Charles Village was debated a decade ago, opponents raised fears about Baltimore's "balkanization" -- a situation in which wealthier neighborhoods would pay for enhanced services, and poorer ones would be left to fend for themselves. Not only hasn't that happened -- after the Charles Village Community Benefits District was established in 1994, only one additional neighborhood taxing district was created, in Midtown -- but the benefits district faces a nasty revolt from within its ranks.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
IT SEEMED like a perfect match of a desire and a willingness to accommodate it. Influential developers John Paterakis and C. William Struever wanted more security and street-sweeping for their properties at Inner Harbor East and at the old Allied Signal site and other parts of Fells Point. The Downtown Partnership, with more than a decade of experience providing such services to the central business district, was agreeable to extending its reach. And state legislators representing the city's waterfront shepherded through bills to expand the boundaries of the partnership's authority to impose a tax surcharge.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
Harford County representatives to the House of Delegates have placed a plan by County Executive James M. Harkins to create special taxing districts on its summer-study agenda, effectively killing the bill for this General Assembly session, officials confirmed yesterday. Del. Barry Glassman, a Republican who is delegation chairman, said yesterday that he sent a letter to Harkins late last week notifying him of the delegates' decision. "There were just so many unanswered questions," Glassman said.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
Residents of Charles Village -- the first city neighborhood to agree to pay more property taxes for safer, cleaner streets -- are unlikely to see their money put into action until March.The special taxing district's full staff -- 12 to 14 public safety officers, a two- to four-member Clean Team, an administrator and a director of public safety -- won't be hired until then, Thomas J. Shafer, chairman of the district's interim board, told residents last night at Lovely Lane United Methodist Church.
NEWS
By Joel Obermayer and Joel Obermayer,Sun Staff Writer | October 1, 1994
Because of an editing error, an article in Saturday's paper incorrectly stated the percentage of votes required for a special tax referendum to pass in Charles Village. The measure requires an affirmative vote from 58 percent of all ballots that are returned. Registered voters and property owners in the district are eligible to vote.The Baltimore Sun regrets the error.Michael Foster will vote this month to raise his property taxes, and he hopes other Charles Village residents will do the same.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2003
A plan floated recently in Annapolis by County Executive James M. Harkins to add Harford to the short list of counties that have taxing authority to offset development costs has been met with skepticism by the community and lawmakers who say Harkins has not presented a clear picture of why he wants this new power. Harkins is seeking to create special taxing districts in the county, primarily in the Perryman area, which the county has designated for growth, but which has roads woefully ill-equipped to handle more traffic.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2003
Two state senators from Harford County have introduced legislation that would allow the County Council to consider special taxing districts in areas where development is straining infrastructure. The bill, introduced at the request of County Executive James M. Harkins, would allow for special taxing districts - at the request of property owners - to collect fees that would pay for a broad range of services, from schools to water and sewer. Sens. Nancy Jacobs and J. Robert Hooper, both Republicans, introduced the bill last week to meet Friday's Senate filing deadline for legislation.
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