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Taxing Authority

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BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court sent revenue-short states a strong hint yesterday that they might gain -- perhaps by summer -- more power to tax the income of businesses that operate across state lines and globally.In a move that a Maryland official said could add to the state's coffers, the court volunteered to consider overruling two of its own decisions curbing states' taxing authority.Tax lawyers said the court's move widened a controversy that could involve tens of millions of dollars of tax liability.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | December 9, 2007
Aberdeen officials say they will push state legislators for a local hotel tax, even though it appears that winning the delegation's support for the measure could be an uphill struggle. With 900 hotel rooms in the city, the tax could be a strong revenue source and could lead to a reduction in the city's property tax rate and offset expenses related to the city's Ripken Stadium lease, said Councilman Ronald Kupferman. "If we don't ask for it, we are beat before we even start," said Kupferman, a longtime advocate of a hotel tax. Because taxing authority comes from the General Assembly, neither the county nor its three municipalities can enact a tax without the enabling legislation from the state.
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NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
A long-standing drive to pick school board members through elections got a half-hearted kick-start this week when the county council passed a resolution asking state lawmakers to pass a law allowing board elections.But the council, which passed the resolution on the strength of four "yes" votes and three abstentions Monday night, left all the disagreeable and politically charged details for state lawmakers to figure out.`Shallow resolution'"This is very little help to the General Assembly," said Sen. Philip C. Jimeno.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Tricia Bishop and Larry Carson and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
The door to a portable classroom slams, and ice chunks fly from above as shivering teens, many in T-shirts and short sleeves, make their way to a reading class at Patapsco Middle School in Ellicott City. Mornings are the worst. "It's coldest then," said eighth-grader Taylor Boone. Yet the pupils have to leave their jackets in the school's main building because of security concerns. His reading program meets in one of seven portable classrooms at the school, which is crowded despite a recent expansion that added four science rooms, a music suite, a bigger cafeteria and two classrooms for non-English-speaking children.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | March 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court sent revenue-short states a strong hint yesterday that they might gain more power to tax the income of businesses that operate across state lines and globally.In a move that a Maryland official said could aid the state's coffers, the court volunteered to consider overruling two of its own decisions curbing states' taxing authority. It had not been asked directly to do that.Tax lawyers said the court's move widened a controversy that could involve tens of millions of dollars of tax liability.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | June 13, 1991
A proposal to give the Howard County school board special taxing authority to raise money for schools is being evaluated by the county executive, who came under fire this year for making cuts in the education budget.The concept is "still in the mulling stage," said County Executive Charles I. Ecker, who said he considered the proposal, advanced by the president of the local Chamber of Commerce, "an idea worth exploring."Richard Pettingill, the chamber president, said he suggested the separate taxing authority for county schools recently when the group's executive board met with Mr. Ecker.
NEWS
By Howard County Bureau of The Sun cDB | September 6, 1991
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday that he has backed off from asking the county's legislative delegation for authority to raise hotel and motel, telephone and energy taxes. Mr. Ecker said he decided not to pursue the plan after members of the delegation told him informally "they did not approve of it."Mr. Ecker, a Republican in his first term, had planned to ask the General Assembly for the taxing authority to try to lower the property tax rate of $2.59 per $100 of assessed value.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
Looking to raise some of the millions needed to wire city schools for computers and make basic repairs, the Baltimore school board wants permission to issue its own bonds.School officials went to Annapolis yesterday to seek legislative support for an unusual arrangement that would allow them to sell bonds worth $25 million -- even though they are not elected and do not have taxing authority.The school board hopes to persuade state lawmakers to agree to the one-time bond sale, which would be used to leverage an additional $37.5 million in matching state funds.
NEWS
January 28, 1994
The limits to local charter government seem annoyingly picayune at times. And annoyingly gigantic at others. Such is the case with the taxing authority of Harford and other counties, which requires the approval of a state General Assembly that doesn't know or care much about the matter.State legislators mostly just vote on such bills according to the unanimous will of the affected county's delegation, unless there are broader legal implications. The dissent of a single delegation member is often sufficient to kill a bill, the assumption being that the county must be unified if it is to gain such precious permission.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
There must be a moment each spring when, besieged by parents and teachers wanting more, always more money for schools, every county executive and mayor in Maryland secretly wishes the local school board could collect its own taxes. That's what Del. Donald E. Murphy, a Baltimore County- Howard Republican, is proposing for Howard County - school board-imposed property taxes - as one of several local bills up for discussion at a public hearing Nov. 16. Howard's elected school board is the focus of several bills for the 2001 General Assembly session as legislators and board members continue last year's struggle over the how the board should be made up and what length terms should be. The school board has submitted a bill that would shorten members' terms from six to four years and increase the number of members from five to seven, but would continue countywide election.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2003
Watch out, tax cheats. William Donald Schaefer wants you in handcuffs - which worries some legislators. The comptroller is pushing a measure in the General Assembly that would give his investigative agents the authority to arrest anyone in Maryland who fails to pay taxes. The legislation under consideration today by the House of Delegates would expand the authority of the comptroller's 15-member police force well beyond its current jurisdiction, which primarily includes the power to arrest cigarette and alcohol smugglers.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2003
Downtown Baltimore has shifted to the east in recent years, and now a business advocacy group with special taxing power hopes to follow the growth, and the money, all the way to Fells Point. The nonprofit Downtown Partnership of Baltimore Inc. wants state legislative authority to extend its domain to Inner Harbor East, the western edge of Fells Point and everything in between - but not close-knit Little Italy. The new borders would mark the first expansion since the district, the Downtown Management Authority, was formed in 1992.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2000
There must be a moment each spring when, besieged by parents and teachers wanting more, always more money for schools, every county executive and mayor in Maryland secretly wishes the local school board could collect its own taxes. That's what Del. Donald E. Murphy, a Baltimore County- Howard Republican, is proposing for Howard County - school board-imposed property taxes - as one of several local bills up for discussion at a public hearing Nov. 16. Howard's elected school board is the focus of several bills for the 2001 General Assembly session as legislators and board members continue last year's struggle over the how the board should be made up and what length terms should be. The school board has submitted a bill that would shorten members' terms from six to four years and increase the number of members from five to seven, but would continue countywide election.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
Looking to raise some of the millions needed to wire city schools for computers and make basic repairs, the Baltimore school board wants permission to issue its own bonds.School officials went to Annapolis yesterday to seek legislative support for an unusual arrangement that would allow them to sell bonds worth $25 million -- even though they are not elected and do not have taxing authority.The school board hopes to persuade state lawmakers to agree to the one-time bond sale, which would be used to leverage an additional $37.5 million in matching state funds.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | August 18, 1999
A long-standing drive to pick school board members through elections got a half-hearted kick-start this week when the county council passed a resolution asking state lawmakers to pass a law allowing board elections.But the council, which passed the resolution on the strength of four "yes" votes and three abstentions Monday night, left all the disagreeable and politically charged details for state lawmakers to figure out.`Shallow resolution'"This is very little help to the General Assembly," said Sen. Philip C. Jimeno.
NEWS
August 3, 1999
OWNING a home is a cherished American symbol of upward mobility. Yet many people are unsuitable to be homeowners. They do not earn enough for payments and repairs, or they are simply too irresponsible.Sun reporter John B. O'Donnell painted a devastating picture of what happens when unscrupulous speculators get their claws into people who lack a full understanding of their obligations. The con men reap huge profits overnight by reselling substandard homes at inflated prices to ill-informed buyers, who soon face foreclosure.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | January 15, 1992
While other local government leaders pleaded for relief from state budget cuts yesterday, County Executive Robert R. Neall suggested thatperhaps the time has come for the counties to go it alone.Speaking before the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, Neall acknowledged that a proposed $14.9 million reduction in state aid will hurt AnneArundel. "Quite frankly, (it's) going to hit us hard," he said.But Neall said he would find a way to absorb the shortfall with minimal effect on services if he had to.Other county executives told the powerful Budget and Taxation panel there is no way to preservethe quality of their services if the legislature approves the governor's plan to cut $142 million from the 23 counties and Baltimore City.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | February 2, 1992
The next time you stay in a county hotel, put your boat in a slip atthe Havre de Grace marina or use your phone, you may have to pay a little more in local taxes.County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann wants permission from the state for the county to start charging a rangeof new user and product taxes.Rehrmann wants to take advantage of state law that permits counties, with the permission of the General Assembly, to charge any of 12 local taxes: room taxes at hotels and motels, and taxes on cable television, telephone service, natural gas, fuel oil, coal, steam, electric, liquid petroleum, beverage containers, boat slips and parking lots.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1999
Robert C. Schaeffer, author of Anne Arundel County's tax cap, has promised to fight county leaders -- and anybody else -- who tries to repeal the tax cap or recover revenue lost during years in which the county did not collect as much in property taxes as it could have.Schaeffer, a Severna Park Republican who heads the Anne Arundel Taxpayers Association, said in an interview this week that he would go to court to stop any attempt to collect taxes retroactively. The amount the county might generate would be dwarfed by "the amount it would cost them to fight us," he said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1997
Baltimore and other cities in Maryland could impose a 5 percent amusement tax on videotape and game cartridge rentals under legislation being considered in Annapolis.Supporters of the measure say they are willing to extend the taxing authority to any interested counties, as well.But the proposal, before the state Senate, is drawing strong opposition from video dealers and prompting a bit of rebellion.Opponents plan to protest the proposed tax tomorrow by throwing videotapes off the Annapolis City Dock -- into a net so as not to endanger the environment -- in hopes that lawmakers will kill the legislation.
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