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NEWS
April 29, 2014
On a brutally cold January day I waited for a Yellow cab to take my mom to chemotherapy. I had booked the cab the night before on the Yellow cab website. It never showed. Neither did the second cab the dispatcher sent. The next time I used Uber. It worked perfectly, and I have never looked back ( "Make room for ride-sharing," April 28). Uber is popular for one reason: It works and the cab companies don't. Uber provides accountability. You rate the Uber driver on your smartphone by awarding stars.
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NEWS
April 28, 2014
The apparent decision by a state administrative law judge to declare Uber a "common carrier" once again illustrates that Maryland is trapped in the past by special interest lobbyists ( "Rules loom for car service," April 25). As the Sun reporters point out, the state legislature was asked this year to enact legislation that would have required Uber to provide a certain amount of ride-share insurance and would have enabled Uber to continue calling itself a smartphone app (which it actually is)
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
Two men have been arrested and charged in the shooting and robbery of an Annapolis taxi driver found dead in Crownsville earlier this month, prosecutors said. Michael Juvan Wallace, 23, of Fort Meade, and Trevor Allen Snead, 17, of Faulkner, face murder, assault, armed robbery and other charges in the March 12 killing of Benjamin Delano Kirby, Jr., according to the Anne Arundel County State's Attorney. Kirby, 41, was found with a gunshot wound in the head in a driveway near the intersection of Honeysuckle Lane and Generals Highway.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2014
Changes proposed by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for Baltimore's controversial and so-far unsuccessful taxi tax drew mixed reviews from city taxi and livery firms. The proposed amendments to the tax, to be introduced before the City Council today, would switch the levy from 25 cents per passenger to 35 cents per trip for taxis starting July 1. The city implemented the tax Oct. 1, but many taxi operators simply ignored it, with some complaining and refusing to pay it. Others only began complying after they were allowed to pass the cost on to customers.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Members of the City Council are considering amending Baltimore's controversial new taxi tax, switching collection from the current per-passenger structure to a per-trip basis. "Some of us think it might be more efficient and effective to do per trip," Councilman Carl Stokes, chair of the taxation committee, said Thursday. The proposed change comes after months of complaints from taxi drivers and cab, limousine and other livery companies that the current per-passenger collection structure is far too burdensome.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | January 9, 2014
Uber -- the company that allows users to hail a car via a smartphone app -- is drastically cutting prices in several markets including Baltimore.  The price changes run as much as a 20 percent discount, but Baltimore riders will see a six percent drop. A mininum fare for Baltimore is now $4.60 down from $5.   With this cut, Uber spokeswoman Nairi Hourdajian said that uberX in Baltimore becomes up to 18 percent cheaper than a traditional taxi. Recently, the car service has come under fire for its "surge pricing" policy, which raises car rates during periods of peak demand.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
About 5 p.m. on a recent afternoon, Kevin Leslie and Chris Zorn, both 28, hopped off a small boat onto a short pier at the Canton waterfront, headed for happy-hour drinks at nearby Claddagh Pub. The friends had met after work - Leslie at Wells Fargo and Zorn at Big City Farms - and for their evening in popular O'Donnell Square, the Harbor Connector water taxi was the easy choice for getting across town, they said. "There are no stoplights on the water, and you always know exactly when [the boat]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Cars with pink mustaches and fist-bumping drivers. Rides in glossy town cars or SUVs. New ride-sharing companies Lyft and Uber are giving Baltimore's standard taxi cabs a run for their money. To see how these companies compare, reporter Julie Scharper and photographer Lloyd Fox rode between the Avenue in Hampden and the corner of Broadway and Thames Street in Fells Point on a dreary recent morning. Lyft Ease of use of app: 4 stars (out of 4) Wait time for arrival: 11 min. Quality of vehicle: 4 stars Cleanliness of vehicle: 4 stars Conversation with driver: 4 stars Safety of ride: 4 stars Cost of ride: $15 (passengers set their own donation; $5 was suggested for our ride)
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
The City Council is considering delaying a controversial new tax on taxi, limousine and other livery services in Baltimore that business owners said they refuse to pay. Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke said she will introduce a bill today that would delay by 180 days the implementation of the 25-cents per passenger excise tax on cabs, limousines and for-hire sedans, which went into effect Oct. 1 but is not due to start being collected until Nov. 25....
NEWS
November 13, 2013
A revolt is brewing among Baltimore taxi and limo operators, who are protesting a new city tax of 25 cents per passenger that went into effect Oct. 1. The taxi owners claim the new tax will be difficult to collect and that they can't pass the additional cost on to consumers by raising their rates. So, in what they are calling an act of civil disobedience, the companies say they won't pay. Meanwhile, the city is insisting it will take them to court if they don't. Before things get ugly, the city and its cabbies need to take a step back from the hole they are digging for themselves and come up with a way to end the standoff that both sides can live with.
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