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NEWS
May 21, 2012
Your recent poll, although unscientific, indicates that a majority of Marylanders are not satisfied with the outcome of this special legislative session ("What Maryland thinks," May 18). If they are not satisfied with the way that their elected officials have voted, then why did they re-elect them? They should know that liberals vote to increase taxes and spending. For them, government is the answer to everything. Maryland voters do this every election - they re-elect the same people and then complain.
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NEWS
February 12, 2014
As a citizen of Maryland, I oppose S.B. 629, a bill in the state Senate that, if enacted, would authorize a county or municipality to impose an annual surcharge for the registration of a motor vehicle. The legislation would provide for a surcharge up to $20 per year per vehicle and require that revenue from the surcharge be used for transportation development purposes. While the terminology used in S.B. 629 says "surcharge," this is really a tax since the intent is for the "surcharge" to apply every year.
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NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
U.S. Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett knocked President Clinton's economic plan last night and said a tax increase won't help to create jobs."There's just no way we're going to help the economy by taking more money out of the private sector where it would create jobs."No tax hike has ever reduced the deficit," said Mr. Bartlett, a freshman Republican from Frederick who represents Maryland's 6th District.He spoke to 13 people at a meeting of the Carroll County Taxpayers Association at the County Office Building in Westminster.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
“Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.” - G.K. Chesterton With the gubernatorial campaign in full swing, and the Maryland General Assembly's legislative session less than two months away, we're going to see a lot of talk from state politicians about tax cuts and spending cuts. Most of what you'll hear or read about those issues will be pure prevarications. At a forum on state manufacturing, Democratic and Republican candidates supported the idea of cutting the state's corporate income tax rate . Attorney General Doug Gansler, a Democrat, and Republican candidates Harford County Executive David Craig, Del. Ron George and Charles Lollar all support some form of reduction in the corporate income tax rate.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | August 24, 1992
Maybe George Bush is a Republican, maybe he did run his own business, and maybe he does want to treat Wall Street to a cut in the capital gains tax. But among many of the economists who shape the strategies of the nation's banks and investment houses, patience with the president ended with his speech last week.The very highlight of his plan -- offsetting cuts in taxes and spending -- was widely denounced as poison for an economy in a joyless, jobless recovery."Almost every economist would agree that equal cuts in taxes and spending actually depress the economy," said Allen Sinai, chief economist of Boston Co. "It is not a growth program."
NEWS
By Christopher Kirkpatrick and Christopher Kirkpatrick,Capital News Service | April 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Maryland congressional Democrats may be singing the blues after a lobbying group parodied them in song Friday as Congress' biggest spenders, but even the most thrifty Republican from the state could do no better than a "B".The National Taxpayers Union gave all six Maryland Democrats in Congress an "F" letter grade for voting against spending cuts and for tax increases in 1993.In the report, Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski was rated the eighth biggest spender in the Senate, while Democratic Sen. Paul Sarbanes was 18th.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
For General Assembly budget leaders, the next six weeks could be excruciating. As Maryland's deficit widens, the options available to balance the budget -- as required by the state constitution -- become increasingly distasteful. Every possible avenue offering fiscal relief must be pursued.That includes major tax increases and Draconian spending cuts. These are the two extremes on the government's budget pendulum. Legislators would rather avoid both options. But Maryland's fiscal outlook is so bleak that a combination of new taxes and sweeping program cuts might be unavoidable.
NEWS
March 5, 1994
THE CATO Institute, a conservative think-tank that believes the only good government is one that cuts taxes and spending simultaneously, has rated the nation's governors. Not surprisingly, our governor, William Donald Schaefer, gets an overall grade of C. Here's why:"Schaefer may have made the biggest mistake of his 40 years in public office two years ago when he rammed a major tax increase through the state legislature. That tax hike included higher income tax rates on the rich, a gas tax increase, an expanded sales tax, and a doubling of the cigarette tax."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and John W. Frece and Laura Lippman and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 11, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- What does a taxpayer really want?That's the question plaguing lawmakers as they sift through contradictory responses to Gov. William Donald Schaefer's call for higher taxes.Telephone calls to legislative offices and the governor's office in the 24 hours after the State of the State address were overwhelmingly anti-tax, according to staff.But there also were reports that some Marylanders had praised the governor for taking charge of the state's fiscal crisis. They called for support for government programs that could be doomed if taxes are not raised or if drastic cuts are not made elsewhere in the budget.
NEWS
July 19, 1993
Paul Tsongas has it just about right when he says the Clinton administration's "Democrats only" approach on taxes and spending has pushed the Republicans into a "negativism" that undercuts the nation's hopes for an effective assault on chronic federal deficits. As House and Senate conferees get down to the business of producing an economic plan before their early-August recess, the signs of a disconnect from budget realities are all around.GOP legislators, who have effectively opted out by unanimously opposing anything any Democrat has concocted, are now seizing on the flimsiest of evidence to claim the deficit problem is not as bad as the White House projects.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
While it's not uncommon for any negotiation to begin with a degree of doubt, it's difficult to imagine any launched with as little optimism as accompanied the opening last week of federal budget talks. That President Barack Obama could possibly still be voicing any expectation of a "grand bargain" reaching far into the future suggests an outlook shared only by those who play multi-state lotteries and bet the pick six at the race track. For all the derision and falling poll numbers that Congress, and particularly the Republicans, suffered during last month's government shutdown and near-default that began with a desire to "defund" Obamacare but later spread to the overall budget and beyond, the party's basic positions on tax and spending fundamentals look little changed.
NEWS
February 13, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget proposes a $1.4 billion increase in spending over last year ("O'Malley offers $37.3 billion plan," Jan. 17). Spending has increased 26 percent since 2008, taxes have been raised 24 times and high-income earners have fled the state due to unfriendly tax policies. Bechtel and Northrop Grumman have moved to Virginia, along with hundreds of thousands of jobs. Now a 15-cent increase in gas tax? Florida, Tennessee and Texas have no income tax, Indiana is calling for a 10 percent tax cut. New Mexico's governor has called for slashing corporate taxes to 4.9 percent.
NEWS
January 3, 2013
With the fiscal cliff surmounted, at least temporarily, a new Congress sworn in and Republicans licking their self-inflicted wounds, it is tempting to theorize that a new political reality has taken hold in the nation's capital - one where the American economy won't be taken hostage by the House GOP and Washington won't bounce around from one trumped-up crisis to another. The best evidence of this would be the lopsided and bipartisan votes in favor of the final tax package approved by both the House and Senate.
NEWS
May 21, 2012
Your recent poll, although unscientific, indicates that a majority of Marylanders are not satisfied with the outcome of this special legislative session ("What Maryland thinks," May 18). If they are not satisfied with the way that their elected officials have voted, then why did they re-elect them? They should know that liberals vote to increase taxes and spending. For them, government is the answer to everything. Maryland voters do this every election - they re-elect the same people and then complain.
NEWS
April 10, 2012
It wouldn't be right to call the calamitous end of the General Assembly session a failure. The word "failure" implies that those involved were trying to do the right thing and were for some reason unsuccessful. What happened Monday night, as the politics of an ill-considered gambling expansion bill tangled up a sensible compromise on taxes and the budget, was something quite different, a mixture of sabotage, negligence and too-cute-by-half gamesmanship. It reflects poorly on Maryland's leaders and belies the seriousness of the one real matter at hand: Who should be asked to pay more to maintain crucial state services, and how much?
NEWS
February 6, 2012
There is just no end to Gov.Martin O'Malley's tax-and-spend program. Recently, he indicated that he will propose a 6 percent sales tax on all wholesale gasoline purchases. His excuse now is that wants to use the money for transportation projects. As the price of gasoline is likely to surge toward $5 per gallon this summer, there just is no relief in sight. This makes it the second time that Mr. O'Malley has proposed a major tax increase this year, as he floated the idea of raising the retail sales tax from 6 percent to 7 percent on the opening day of the General Assembly session.
NEWS
By Tom Wicker | December 13, 1991
ANOTHER election year is just around the corner, so here's a piece of advice that candidates for dogcatcher or president would do well to observe: Be careful what you promise. It could come back to haunt you.Remember George Bush in 1988, boldly telling the voters, "Read my lips"? There would be no tax increase while he was president. But taxes went up after two years, and the federal deficit never stopped rising.Remember Gov. Jim Florio of New Jersey, who as a Democratic candidate in 1989 said he saw no necessity for raising taxes?
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 16, 2007
COLUMBIA, S.C. -- Republican presidential candidates found their conservative credentials under fire last night in a spirited debate that probed their different backgrounds on such issues as abortion, gun control and taxes. Their records came into play after most of the candidates worked to court conservatives by stressing their support for the U.S. effort in Iraq, condemning Democratic proposals for withdrawal, and vowing to rein in federal spending that soared under their own party's rule in Washington.
NEWS
January 12, 2012
Regarding your story on the legislative session that opens this week ("Big 'to do' list in Annapolis," Jan. 9): You gotta love House Speaker Michael Busch: He's so tenured, so entrenched and so oblivious to the nonsensicality of his own words when he says things like "I'm going to pass a tax increase," and "we're going to put people back to work. " His is a truly warped understanding of how a free market economy is supposed to function. To think that by taking ever more money from citizens the government can engineer sustainable economic growth is both presumptuous and doomed to failure.
NEWS
December 28, 2011
It is good to see a Democrat - Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot - who does not pay homage to the tax and spend (as much as they can get away with) economic philosophy of the left ("Franchot drifts right," Dec. 26). Hopefully, he is keeping our alabaster nanny, Gov. Martin O'Malley, awake at nights. Common sense (and not political vote buying) has to prevail at some point. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville
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