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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
When the legislature's budget committees put together thei version of the state budget, they make not only the billion-dollar decisions but also the minuscule ones. The purpose of these tiny tugs on the purse strings is to get the attention of individuals and departments.Some of the targets of these budget darts would contend that the legislators are trying to micromanage state government. The legislators would contend that they are just trying to make sure the citizens are getting their money's worth.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Jean Thompson contributed to this article | March 25, 1995
Attempting to soften the blow of his decision to kill a monthly subsidy program for the disabled poor, Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday asked the General Assembly to appropriate nearly $20 million to help former recipients find shelter, obtain medical care or receive federal assistance.The governor introduced a $64.5 million supplement to his original $14.5 billion budget, which lawmakers had pared to $14.3 billion earlier in the session, in part by cutting several spending initiatives that were priorities for Mr. Glendening.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau | March 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- When state Sen. Ida Ruben voted "No" and killed a $430 million tax bill last Monday, she risked as much as $35 million in state aid for her county.But she also was wielding the sword of parochialism."The money won't go to anybody else either," the Montgomery County Democrat said.Legislators have always tried to bring home the bacon -- public works projects or a stream of dollars for schools, public safety and welfare.But this year, some lawmakers are just as worried about what the other guy is getting.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | January 31, 2008
Stung by public backlash, a growing number of lawmakers are considering the repeal of a new law requiring that all Maryland homeowners apply for a tax credit they previously had received automatically. A bill heard yesterday by the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee would restore the automatic protection homeowners have had from being taxed for the full value of their homes when property assessments rise rapidly. Last year, the General Assembly unanimously approved the new law, which requires that all homeowners apply for the Homestead Tax Credit.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
If there is one criticism that is most consistently delivered by the opponents of Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in his quest to replace Gov. Martin O'Malley, it is that he is a paragon of the status quo, the anointed son of an insular Democratic Party establishment. If he wanted to prove his critics' point, he could not have found a more damning way to do it than with his support for disgraced state Sen. Ulysses Currie for re-election. Mr. Currie is facing a spirited primary challenge in the 25th District in Prince George's County, which Mr. Brown used to represent in the House of Delegates.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
A legislative analyst told a state Senate committee yesterday that Maryland's request for bids for a lucrative new vehicle emissions testing contract does not appear to favor one potential bidder over another, despite accusations to the contrary from the firm that now has the contract."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Pro-gambling lawmakers scrambled yesterday to assemble a significant tax package that could win approval from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and free the administration's slots bill for a long-sought vote in the House of Delegates. House Democrats insisted that no vote would come on legalizing slot-machine gambling until Ehrlich agrees to at least $500 million in new revenues. "The House position is: No taxes, no slots," said Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairwoman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun Timothy B. Wheeler of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | January 26, 1992
EASTON -- State Sen. Laurence Levitan, opening his mail from an Ocean City resident, read this message: "No new taxes."He didn't think twice before jotting down his pointed reply: "No new sand."In its own small way, Mr. Levitan's zip-for-zap reaction underscores how many budget-badgered lawmakers feel about the state's role in funding future Ocean City beach projects.When state Department of Natural Resources officials go before a joint legislative budget committee Tuesday in Annapolis to discuss the effects of the Jan. 4 storm that pounded the shore, they will face strong opposition to spending more tax dollars on beach protection measures.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 17, 1994
Despite Senate opposition, Maryland House leaders said yesterday they will push for a cigarette tax increase this year as a way of financing new school construction, an increase in welfare benefits and an assortment of other programs and projects.House Appropriations Committee Chairman Howard P. Rawlings said committee leaders, with the backing of House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., have agreed to push for a 12 1/2 -cents-a-pack increase in the cigarette tax.That is half the 25-cents-a-pack increase Gov. William Donald Schaefer has requested, but would still raise about $40 million in revenue by increasing Maryland's 36-cents-a-pack tax to 48 1/2 cents.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Elderly nuns made the pilgrimage. So did teen-age figure skaters. Music fans who are passionate about Mozart showed up. So did animal lovers who worry about hurt raccoons.All day Saturday and for six hours yesterday, hundreds of people from all walks of life lined up inside the Maryland Senate building the way petitioners might once have gathered outside a medieval castle.In the gloomy corridor, they waited patiently for a six-minute chance to appeal to a Senate panel for the same blessing: Money for their causes.
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