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NEWS
March 19, 2001
Today's highlights 2 p.m. Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, hearing on college and university budgets, Room 3 West, Miller Senate Office Building. 6 p.m. House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 8 p.m. Senate meets, Senate chamber.
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NEWS
May 23, 2014
If there is one criticism that is most consistently delivered by the opponents of Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in his quest to replace Gov. Martin O'Malley, it is that he is a paragon of the status quo, the anointed son of an insular Democratic Party establishment. If he wanted to prove his critics' point, he could not have found a more damning way to do it than with his support for disgraced state Sen. Ulysses Currie for re-election. Mr. Currie is facing a spirited primary challenge in the 25th District in Prince George's County, which Mr. Brown used to represent in the House of Delegates.
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NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke told a Senate committee yesterday that he wants the state to assume control of the city state's attorney's office.The state already has taken over the City Detention Center and the New Community College of Baltimore.But Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman, D-Baltimore, said there may not be enough money in the budget for the state to pick up the $12 million tab for the city's prosecutor."It is a good idea," said Senator Hoffman, vice chairwoman of the Budget and Taxation Committee, which heard from Mr. Schmoke yesterday.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Dozens of Baltimore teens and young adults packed a state Senate hearing Wednesday, urging lawmakers not to build a new Baltimore jail for juvenile offenders charged as adults and instead shift efforts to keeping youths from being locked up in the first place. The comments came as the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee met to take testimony on the $70 million, 120-bed proposal being pushed by the state as a way to improve conditions for youthful prisoners in the city. Opponents, such as 21-year-old activist Nicole Cheatom, told senators that the state should repurpose a women's prerelease unit closed three years ago instead of building a new facility.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 12, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has approved the nomination of Robert R. Neall to fill the state Senate seat vacant since John A. Cade's death last month.The governor's endorsement was a formality after the Anne Arundel Republican Central Committee's selection of Neall last week.The full committee voted 10-3 to pick the former three-term state legislator and Anne Arundel County executive for the $29,700-a-year post.Neall, 48, will be sworn in Tuesday at a State House ceremony in Annapolis.He also will assume Cade's assignment on the influential Budget and Taxation Committee when the General Assembly convenes next month.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
Baltimore's Board of Estimates told the City Council yesterday to reject a pending bill aimed at reducing a $20 annual fee charged for residential burglar alarms. The council's taxation committee is scheduled to decide today whether to heed the board's advice by voting to kill the bill, or to send it to the full council for consideration. "I'm hoping that we move it along," said Councilwoman Helen L. Holton, who introduced the proposal. "If the full council passes it, it's then up to the mayor, who'll either take the recommendation of the council or veto it."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | March 13, 1991
The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee is to hear its subcommittee's recommendation today to cut $300,000 from the budget of the state's Office of Sports Promotion.The subcommittee voted to forward those cuts to its parent committee Friday.The Office of Sports Promotion, a program of Maryland's Department of Economic and Employment Development, has been in jeopardy since last month, when a legislative budget analyst recommended the basic termination of the office. However, a House subcommittee voted to cut only $125,000 of the $250,000 OSP budget earmarked for the Maryland State Games, and left the OSP's remaining request for $664,000 intact.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | March 20, 1993
The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee put the finishing touches on its version of the state budget yesterday, cutting slightly less than the House of Delegates did from the proposal by Gov. William Donald Schaefer.The Senate committee called for $208 million in cuts from the administration's $12.7 billion budget, while the House, in the spending plan it approved on Thursday, asks for a $220 million reduction.Though there are some significant differences between the two proposals, there is much more similarity, setting the stage for a smooth resolution after three years of often heated budget-balancing battles.
NEWS
November 8, 2011
What does it take to get a bribery conviction in Maryland? State Sen. Ulysses Currie, who took a quarter-million dollars from a grocery store chain to advocate on its behalf, and who told no one about the arrangement, was just found not guilty on several counts of bribery by a federal jury in Baltimore. Apparently, corrupt public officials need not take paper bags of cash under the table anymore; they can just get their lucre by direct deposit. If this is to become the new standard in Maryland, a lot of lobbyists are about to be out of a job. Why bother hiring them when corporations can simply put lawmakers on the payroll?
NEWS
September 5, 2010
State Sen. Ulysses Currie, chairman of the powerful Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, is innocent until proven guilty — but his day in court is finally coming. Last week, the results of a lengthy federal investigation came to fruition: a 48-page indictment charging him with taking nearly a quarter-million dollars in bribes to use his influence on behalf of the Shoppers Food & Pharmacy chain. That Mr. Currie worked diligently on behalf of Shoppers is unlikely to be in dispute.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | February 6, 2008
Now that Maryland has turned up its tax rates a couple more watts, big and bright as neon, is it too much to ask the state to stop taking even more of our money under cover of darkness? We pay Maryland in multiple ways beyond the sticker price. One of the biggest offenders will be on display today before the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee - the extortionate interest the state collects on late taxes. You might think a legislature with a history of outrage over private-sector usury would be embarrassed by its own resemblance to Tony Soprano.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | January 31, 2008
Stung by public backlash, a growing number of lawmakers are considering the repeal of a new law requiring that all Maryland homeowners apply for a tax credit they previously had received automatically. A bill heard yesterday by the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee would restore the automatic protection homeowners have had from being taxed for the full value of their homes when property assessments rise rapidly. Last year, the General Assembly unanimously approved the new law, which requires that all homeowners apply for the Homestead Tax Credit.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2007
When Philadelphia-based Resources America Inc. sold the 30-story Alex. Brown Building in downtown Baltimore to a Miami firm last year, they structured the deal in a way that saved them an estimated $2.4 million in city and state transfer and recordation taxes. In 2002, the Rouse Co. used the same legal method to sell 11 shopping centers in Columbia to a New York company, depriving Howard County and Maryland of an estimated $2 million in tax revenues. Most big-ticket developers don't exchange real estate in the same way that homeowners do. Instead of buying property, they acquire ownership of a limited-liability company whose only major asset is property.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
Oversight of privately run group homes for Maryland's troubled children, a responsibility now divided among several state agencies, should be consolidated, a growing number of lawmakers say. "We have to move everything into a single agency," said Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat and chairman of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, which is to hold the first of three hearings on the topic today. Three departments - Human Resources, Health & Mental Hygiene, and Juvenile Services - license and monitor their own sets of group homes.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 30, 2005
Both houses adopt drug discount for uninsured residents About 40,000 uninsured Marylanders would receive lower cost prescription drugs under legislation unanimously adopted by the House and Senate. The Senate gave approval this week to the plan that would allow individuals earning up to $19,140 a year or a family of four making $38,700 to buy drugs at the Medicaid price, which is lower than retail. The bills (SB 728 and HB 1143) require the state health department to seek a waiver from the federal government that would allow the program.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | November 4, 2004
Baltimore's Board of Estimates told the City Council yesterday to reject a pending bill aimed at reducing a $20 annual fee charged for residential burglar alarms. The council's taxation committee is scheduled to decide today whether to heed the board's advice by voting to kill the bill, or to send it to the full council for consideration. "I'm hoping that we move it along," said Councilwoman Helen L. Holton, who introduced the proposal. "If the full council passes it, it's then up to the mayor, who'll either take the recommendation of the council or veto it."
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