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NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | November 18, 2007
You're a relatively small landscaping company, a computer repair outfit or the local muffler shop. You may think you have little leverage in Annapolis, where the fat cats frolic. You are so wrong! You rocked. You and a legion of tax resisters - from Montgomery County and elsewhere - tailored and reshaped Gov. Martin O'Malley's tax reform proposal. Instead of taking even modest steps toward broadening the base of the sales tax, legislators left it alone almost entirely. There had been hope that modernizing the system - extending the sales tax to cover services and making the income tax more progressive - might be a byproduct of the effort to erase a $1.7-billion budget deficit.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
City officials want to hire their own assessors to determine the size of historic tax credits in response to errors blamed on the state that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The proposal is the latest step by the Rawlings-Blake administration to resolve problems in the calculation of the tax credits for improvement to historic properties. The calculations were sometimes wrong, and some property owners wound up owing thousands of dollars more in taxes than they anticipated.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 15, 1998
THE LAST time there was a debate about taxes, Democrats wanted to make sure "the rich" paid their "fair share."As usual, Republicans lost the debate because they could not counter the presupposition that government, no matter how big, is good, and that those who want to keep more of what they earn are greedy and lacking compassion.The debate about taxes (which should begin now and continue through the 2000 presidential election) should focus on what is fair about big government's demands for our money.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
The Maryland attorney general's office has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a ruling by the Court of Appeals about the way Maryland handles the taxation of out-of-state income that could cost counties $50 million a year. Maryland provides credits for taxes that are paid to other states but does not extend those credits to the local portion of the state taxes that is used to partly fund counties and Baltimore. Brian and Karen Wynne, a Howard County couple, contested the second part of the law and the state's top court ruled this year that it violates the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | October 15, 1992
The county wants to fix its antiquated fire tax system but doesn't know how."If someone has a bright idea, we want it," said James H. Eacker. He is chairman of a 14-member committee appointed by County Executive Charles I. Ecker and Councilwoman Shane Pendergrass, D-1st, to look at the fire tax system and make recommendations for improving it.The committee will hold public hearings on the fire tax at 7:30 tonight in the county office building and at 7:30...
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | April 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Rich and poor rushed by the millions to meet the annual tax deadline yesterday, but after both paid their share of the nation's $1.8 trillion dues to Uncle Sam, the income gap between them remained as wide as ever.The tax system does not cause the great divide in income nor does it narrow the gap dramatically, according to a series of recent studies.Although the system takes more from the rich than the poor, it still leaves the richest richer and the poorest poorer. That trend has become a central issue in this year's presidential campaign.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | June 18, 1991
Leaders of Maryland's 800,000 Catholics are urgin lawmakers to restructure the state tax system in an effort to provide financial relief both for the poor and for the non-profit services they use.At a press conference in Annapolis yesterday, church leaders renewed their annual plea for tax changes, saying the recession has had a particularly devastating impact on the poor."
NEWS
June 3, 1996
GOV. PARRIS GLENDENING once again has reiterated his doubts that Maryland's economy can rebound strongly enough in the next few years to make an income-tax cut possible. There's already a $200 million structural deficit looming in next year's budget picture, and making enough reductions in services to cover that gap, plus accomodating a tax cut of a similar magnitude, isn't politically realistic at this time.Still, if Mr. Glendening and legislative leaders want to pursue an income-tax reduction, there is a way to do it without running the perilous course just described.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1999
A bill that supporters say would put "truth" in Maryland's property tax system without changing the amount people pay passed the House of Delegates yesterday.Critics suggest the legislation will lead to higher taxes, and the bill's fate in the Senate is uncertain.Under the bill, which passed 100-38, local governments would no longer tax residential and business properties on 40 percent of their assessed value. Property would instead be taxed at 100 percent of its value, and local tax rates would be cut to 40 percent of what they are now.The result would be that people would pay the same amount in taxes, but their tax rate would be lower.
NEWS
By Christopher Pummer | March 8, 1998
If you've ever leased a vehicle in Maryland, no matter how great a deal you think you got, you got taken for a ride.Don't go running back to the dealership. It wasn't the dealer in this case who fleeced you.The culprit is the state of Maryland, which hits unwary consumers who opt to lease with a tax premium of up to $1,000 or more for making that choice.Auto leasing is already complicated enough, which makes it ripe for exploitation by unscrupulous dealers. Momma might not have raised any dummies, but she also didn't have to contend with such terms as capitalized cost reduction, residual values and money factors before she drove a new Chevy Impala off the lot back in the good ole days.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
It's fair to say that the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan but conservative-leaning think tank, has not historically been a big fan of Maryland, or many other liberal northeastern states, for that matter. The group looks at one side of the equation - taxes - and not at the quality of what you get in return, and that tends to make Maryland look bad compared to, say, Wyoming. The Free State comes out 41st in the Tax Foundation's latest rankings of which states have the best tax climate for business, and the Equality State comes out on top. There are obviously other factors that go into a business' decision of where to locate - the presence of a skilled workforce, transportation infrastructure and the overall quality of life, for example - and the Tax Foundation acknowledges as much.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
NEWS
June 6, 2013
By granting tax benefits on a case-by-case basis to projects like the Exelon building, the government is essentially staying in the development business ("Harbor Point tax deal challenged," June 3). The City Council is greenlighting projects whose proponents make a good case that Baltimore's tax system makes their projects uneconomical. It's heady stuff for the City Council to be wined, dined and lobbied by these powerful interests. Yet to really get Baltimore going, the city should shock the system with a 50 percent tax reduction financed by long-term bonds and let the market decide where the growth will be. Families would flock to the city and developers would fall all over themselves to provide homes, retail, office and other infrastructure development without special tax breaks.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
Rep. John Delaney's new bill offering corporations that repatriate their offshore profits deeply discounted taxes if they invest in a new infrastructure bank, praised in your editorial ("Road work ahead?" May 28), would only serve to reward the very firms that have successfully gamed the tax system in ways that cost the U.S. Treasury $100 billion a year. Mr. Delaney's system of allowing corporations to bid on the tax rate they will ultimately pay opens the system to even more gaming.
NEWS
May 9, 2013
In his remarks to the Greater Baltimore Committee's annual meeting Wednesday night, T. Rowe Price Chairman Brian C. Rogers noted a contradiction in how the world sees Maryland as a place to do business. On the one hand, it is universally recognized for its top-ranked school systems and universities, skilled workforce, research activity, potential for innovation, and great quality of life. On the other, it frequently winds up toward the bottom of rankings of business competitiveness — most recently, by CEO Magazine — largely because of our tax system and regulatory environment.
NEWS
November 5, 2012
What if Congress was bought and sold by corporate interests? What if tax loopholes and regulatory exemptions were bought and sold in the halls of Congress? What if both major political parties have become ineffective at addressing the issues of the day? What if the Constitution was actually designed to restrict government but we continue to elect people to Congress and the presidency who ignore it? What if our use of drones kill more civilians than terrorists and create more enemies for America?
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 24, 1996
MOSCOW -- Now that President Boris N. Yeltsin has been safely re-elected, there's a debt to be paid -- by Russian taxpayers.Someone has to pay for Yeltsin's estimated $11 billion in campaign promises, such as back wages and restitution to depositors of failed banks.Tax collection has tumbled to such dangerously low levels that on Sunday the International Monetary Fund postponed this month's $330 million credit to Russia.The decision was taken as the state tax service acknowledged that tax revenues were 12 percent -- about $4.7 billion -- short in the first half of this year.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1991
Tax-reduction plans for the middle class are sprouting faster than Democratic presidential candidates, but Maryland's only representative on Congress' tax-writing committee says time is running out for a plan to pass Congress this year.Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, said he would like to see a bill passed to remedy problems with the tax system.But it will be difficult, he acknowledged, to reach an agreement on such a contentious issue before Congress adjourns at Thanksgiving.
EXPLORE
August 31, 2012
I would like to respond to "No amount of spin can explain Obama's abundant failures" (letter, Aug. 2). The letter states that the country is not better off than it was four years ago. Now, I know telling people that things are really, really bad and that it's all President Obama's fault is Fox News 101 mantra, but if you examine the facts, things are gradually getting better. If we can step into the "way-back" machine and return to the Fall of 2008, the economy was hemorrhaging jobs, financial institutions were reeling with bad debt, foreclosures were running in the millions.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
A new report from the IRS shows that nearly 21,000 American households with incomes of $200,000 and up didn't owe federal income taxes. If you're like me, your first question is: How can that be? Your possible next question: Can I get that kind of tax treatment? Tax experts say it's not that difficult to avoid owing federal income taxes. And it doesn't require giving up U.S. citizenship, a step that Facebook's co-founder took last year, reportedly to lower his tax bill. Most likely, no single tax move by these households — among the top 3 percent of U.S. earners — allowed them to sidestep taxes.
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