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NEWS
June 29, 2000
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Averting a government shutdown, the Legislature overrode Gov. Don Sundquist's veto and enacted an $18.3 billion budget yesterday without the state income tax he had demanded. The state had risked a full or partial shutdown Saturday because the state Constitution requires a new budget by July 1. Sundquist, who had demanded creation of an income tax to support education and health, vetoed the spending plan Tuesday. The House promptly overrode his veto, 78-19.
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NEWS
February 5, 1999
Lawmakers missing the point on need for stricter ethics lawAfter reading the article ("Assembly scornful of bill on ethics," Jan. 31) by Thomas W. Waldron, I'm amazed so many members of the General Assembly feel this reform legislation is "unnecessary and insulting."They've conveniently forgotten last year's expulsion and resignation, sorry results of cozy relationships with lobbyists and conflicts of interest.Our delegates must lead very sheltered lives to feel hurt over being regarded as ethically suspect.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1997
Four days after a Maryland General Assembly session that produced a first-ever income-tax cut, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. yesterday renewed his call for a thorough examination of the state's entire tax structure.Addressing a conference in Baltimore, the Cumberland Democrat said the state's income-tax burden is the fourth-highest nationwide. He said the corporate tax burden is the fifth-lowest and the sales-tax burden is the sixth-lowest."That suggests to me it needs some rebalancing," said Taylor, a potential rival of Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron and William F. Zorzi Jr. and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. is expected to propose state legislation targeting for-profit health maintenance organizations and telecommunications companies for higher taxes -- part of an effort to pay for his proposal to cut personal income taxes.The package will not include a plan to reduce Maryland's sales tax rate -- a proposal Taylor floated on the opening day of this year's legislative session.The speaker is expected to describe plans for the two tax increases at a press briefing this morning, where he will formally unveil his long-discussed plan for cutting the income tax rate by 10 percent over three years.
NEWS
March 9, 1996
Chamber campaign is wide of the markI have been listening to Champe McCulloch (op-ed, Feb. 17) and the Chamber of Commerce's drumbeat about an income tax cut for two years now, and I feel compelled to respond.The chamber contends that a primary reason companies are not expanding in or locating new facilities in Maryland is because of the state's high income tax rate. They claim the state's income tax is one of the primary reasons behind Maryland's recent sluggish economy. This shortsighted view is simply wrong.
NEWS
February 11, 1996
It's not so easy to move when you are poorMarc Fisher, in a Feb. 2 letter ("Tenants should have moved out of squalor") concerning reports that Jack Reed, a superintendent of city housing inspectors, is the owner of substandard housing units, questioned why the tenants did not move.He seems to be suffering from the same lack of insight as Marie Antoinette, who, when advised during the French Revolution that the people had no bread, said: ''Let them eat cake.'' Wherewould Mr. Fischer have them go?
NEWS
By CASPER R. TAYLOR and SHEILA E. HIXSON | March 19, 1995
Annapolis. -- Of course a hasty tax cut in a shaky economy would be ''fiscal folly,'' as your editorial (March 12) contends. But that does not mean that any tax cut is bad.The premise for a tax cut is that the revenue stream of our existing tax structure asks too much from our citizens to pay for needed services. In 1991, our tax structure could not handle the expansion of services made necessary by the recession, so we asked more from our citizens through a personal tax increase that expired when the recession was over.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | January 29, 1992
Wasn't George the Patrician good last night? It's his best role, after all. He plays George the Patrician so well -- and so much better than he plays George the Tube Socks Shopper at J.C. Penney. The man's a natural defender of the rich. It's in his blood.Consider his defense of a capital gains tax cut. Though it wasn't a major part of his speech, I'm sure it provoked a few salutes in those all-boys clubs the president likes to visit now and then. You could almost see the old-money walruses in their wing chairs, raising a Chivas to their boy in the White House as he chastised the Democrats for engaging in tawdry class warfare.
NEWS
By Dan J. Loden | January 15, 1992
THE FUTURE of Baltimore city is at stake. If lawmakers in Annapolis continue to treat Maryland as a commonwealth of small nations rather than one state joined by economic, social and moral bonds, Baltimore city faces a continuing decline in funds for education with no real hope of reducing its disastrously high property tax rate. Poor public education and high property taxes will further spur the flight of middle-class white and black families.The danger lies in the fact that one measure that is likely to be considered as a "quick fix" for the state's current financial crisis is particularly bad for Baltimore city.
BUSINESS
By Michael Pollick | December 17, 1991
The state's fledgling biotechnology companies need additional tax breaks if they are to flourish, two players in the state's biotechnology game said at a congressional hearing in Baltimore yesterday.Crop Genetics International has raised nearly $65 million but is still four to five years away from bringing any significant product to the market, said Dr. James H. Davis, vice president of research and development for the Hanover-based company.Like most other businesses that need to raise capital, his company would like to see tax breaks reinstated for long-term capital gains to help shake loose more money from venture capitalists.
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