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Tax Structure

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NEWS
May 23, 2008
A few disciplined and determined Anne Arundel County Council members may have saved John R. Leopold from himself. Through deft budget cuts and the shelving of a few favored projects, the council found $43 million in the county executive's spending plan to meet the school system's needs and spare hoteliers an increase in the room tax. Council members may have satisfied worried education leaders and a vocal business lobby, but they've basically passed the...
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NEWS
By Larry Hogan | October 9, 2014
As I've traversed the state of Maryland, I've learned that effective campaigning means clearly and honestly explaining to voters how your decisions in office would be better than those of your opponent. For Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, however, campaigning involves dodging accountability, remaining invisible on the campaign trail and hiding behind wildly off-base and false attack ads. Lieutenant Governor Brown is unable to defend his eight-year record of failure. He continues to try to distract voters by lying about my stances on long-settled issues, including abortion rights and gun laws.
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NEWS
By Anirban Basu and Zach Fritz | December 29, 2013
How did it come to this? Between 2007 and 2012, the State of Maryland raised taxes and fees 24 times according to Change Maryland, including raising income taxes during a 2012 special legislative session, increasing the sales tax on alcoholic beverages from 6 percent to 9 percent in 2011, and levying a hospital assessment that year. Despite these revenue enhancements, the state faces unexpectedly large fiscal deficits this year and next. What was estimated to be a $300 million surplus for fiscal year 2014 is now an $87 million deficit.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
When Washington, D.C., and Montgomery County enacted 5-cent taxes on plastic bags handed out by grocery stores and other businesses, officials expected that the money the government collected as a result would quickly drop off as customers changed their behavior. As it turns out, that hasn't happened at all. The Washington Post reported this month that the city's revenue from the bag tax has been remarkably stable since it was enacted four years ago, and in fact even went up slightly between fiscal 2012 and fiscal 2013.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
NEWS
By Philadelphia Daily News | October 19, 1990
WE HOLD these truths to be self-evident:* Truth No. 1: Ronald Reagan pledged to lower taxes, and Congress went along. The nation's tax structure lost what little progressivity it once had, and the nation's debt exploded.Our tax structure must be more progressive. The rich should have to pay more than they do.* Truth No. 2: Even if tax rates for the rich were 100 percent, the middle class will get hit -- hard. That's where the money is. Without pain for the middle class, the budget-balancing act is phony.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Greater Baltimore Committee said Wednesday that it will organize a private-sector commission to study Maryland's tax structure after dozens of local CEOs named tax reform the top priority for making the state more business friendly. The GBC, a business and civic leadership organization, said it surveyed more than 250 chief executives and conducted workshops across the region to hear business leaders' thoughts on how to increase Maryland's economic competitiveness. "Tax structure was the No. 1 - that's the one they consistently hear about, talk about, hear from others outside this state," said Donald C. Fry, the GBC's president.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,sun reporter | March 10, 2007
Maryland's Board of Revenue Estimates said yesterday that tax collections will be about $50 million less than expected in the current fiscal year and the next, a further sign that softening in the economy will exacerbate the state's budget problems in the next few years. Some fiscal leaders in Annapolis had worried that the revenue drop-off would be much worse, forcing Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly to make immediate, deep reductions to the current budget and the one now being debated in the legislature.
NEWS
November 20, 1990
Just as we suspected, critics rushed to pass (negative) judgment on the Linowes commission's tax-reform suggestions even before they had laid eyes on the yet-to-be approved final report. They had their minds made up; they felt no need to study the document before rejecting the panel's recommendations.Such myopic thinking poses a danger to Maryland's future development. Ignoring the stark realities that the Linowes commission identified could lead to a declining revenue base, increasing demands for social services and a frightening gap between the state's haves and its have-nots.
NEWS
October 18, 1991
The call for revamping Maryland's tax structure couldn't have been more universal at last night's Baltimore school board meeting if Gov. William Donald Schaefer had orchestrated it himself.Board members complained of $8.8 million in proposed cuts to the city's already overburdened education budget -- which were geared to minimize the effect on the classroom -- and urged parents and teachers gathered for the meeting at Coldstream Park Elementary School to lobby their legislators for a change in the state tax structure.
NEWS
By Anirban Basu and Zach Fritz | December 29, 2013
How did it come to this? Between 2007 and 2012, the State of Maryland raised taxes and fees 24 times according to Change Maryland, including raising income taxes during a 2012 special legislative session, increasing the sales tax on alcoholic beverages from 6 percent to 9 percent in 2011, and levying a hospital assessment that year. Despite these revenue enhancements, the state faces unexpectedly large fiscal deficits this year and next. What was estimated to be a $300 million surplus for fiscal year 2014 is now an $87 million deficit.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
It's fair to say that the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan but conservative-leaning think tank, has not historically been a big fan of Maryland, or many other liberal northeastern states, for that matter. The group looks at one side of the equation - taxes - and not at the quality of what you get in return, and that tends to make Maryland look bad compared to, say, Wyoming. The Free State comes out 41st in the Tax Foundation's latest rankings of which states have the best tax climate for business, and the Equality State comes out on top. There are obviously other factors that go into a business' decision of where to locate - the presence of a skilled workforce, transportation infrastructure and the overall quality of life, for example - and the Tax Foundation acknowledges as much.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Maryland retained its tenth-worst ranking in the Tax Foundation's latest study of state tax climates for businesses. The Tax Foundation, which released the latest of its annual rankings Wednesday, said Maryland's corporate tax rate is better structured than in many states - ranking 15th - and its sales tax made the top 10, in part because local jurisdictions don't have add-ons to the state rate. But the state's overall position was pulled down by its broader tax structure, including the rates it charges on individual income, unemployment insurance and property.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley told a group of more than 100 state business leaders Friday that he was disinclined to cut the corporate income tax rate, but he wanted raise the state's minimum wage. "It is a fact that wages have been declining in our country for the first time since the second World War. There is a growing gulf between our middle class and between the wealthy in our country," O'Malley said during a summit organized by the Maryland Chamber of Commerce. The governor added: ""I think that we should raise the minimum wage.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Greater Baltimore Committee said Wednesday that it will organize a private-sector commission to study Maryland's tax structure after dozens of local CEOs named tax reform the top priority for making the state more business friendly. The GBC, a business and civic leadership organization, said it surveyed more than 250 chief executives and conducted workshops across the region to hear business leaders' thoughts on how to increase Maryland's economic competitiveness. "Tax structure was the No. 1 - that's the one they consistently hear about, talk about, hear from others outside this state," said Donald C. Fry, the GBC's president.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | December 13, 1990
Downtown business leaders were urged today to support proposals to revamp Maryland's tax laws by Robert Linowes, chairman of the Maryland Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure.Linowes heads the commission, which last month issued a report that called for major increases in state taxes, a fairer tax structure and increased revenues for education and transportation.Linowes spoke this morning at the Sheraton Inner Harbor Hotel before the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore, a non-profit corporation created to promote the downtown area.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUSINESS EDITOR | September 25, 1991
The current laments in Maryland government about the state's revenue shortfall and the need for higher taxes is, taken by itself, one of the more hypocritical arguments to waft through these ears in a long time.The notion that higher taxes are needed to avoid layoffs makes no sense during a recession, when the state's private economy faces the same dilemma. Why not have the state government give money back to the private sector so the private sector can avoid layoffs?The argument that state revenues must be increased to save essential public services is the best-sounding defense of higher taxes.
NEWS
July 5, 2013
Well, Comrade Gov. Martin O'Malley has literally deluged Maryland taxpayers with new taxes, fees, licenses and tolls ("Marylanders' wallets run on empty," July 2). The People's Republic of Maryland now taxes the rain that falls on your home. The "in the bag" liberal socialist media, refuses to condemn such action even while this nation is in the midst of a depression, not a recession, but a real depression! It is not only the jobs that will be lost, as more and more businesses and industries "vote with their feet" to leave this socialist Garden of Eden, no, it is more than that.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
Targeting tea party groups is an ironic act on the part of the Internal Revenue Service ("Taxing the tea party," May 14). Examples of bullying tactics, corruption and neglect keeps cropping up all over the map of America. In the midst of this, why pour gasoline on emotions by labeling tea party members views as, "extremist, anti-civil rights, anti-immigration?" Snarky remarks in an editorial, however tempting, are not constructive. We need hard core unemotional and nonpartisan journalism now more than ever.
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