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By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
For years, anyone in Maryland could prepare tax returns for money, so it wasn't unheard of to find tax services offered at laundromats, car dealerships or palm-reader shops. The industry is no longer unregulated. Starting this year, individual tax preparers in Maryland must register with the state before they can fill out a return for a fee. They will have to undergo continuing education if they want to stay registered. And consumers now have a place to go to find out if there have been complaints or disciplinary action against a local tax preparer.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
For years, anyone in Maryland could prepare tax returns for money, so it wasn't unheard of to find tax services offered at laundromats, car dealerships or palm-reader shops. The industry is no longer unregulated. Starting this year, individual tax preparers in Maryland must register with the state before they can fill out a return for a fee. They will have to undergo continuing education if they want to stay registered. And consumers now have a place to go to find out if there have been complaints or disciplinary action against a local tax preparer.
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NEWS
April 18, 2011
Because of Emancipation Day, a holiday that celebrates the freeing of slaves in D.C., the traditional tax deadline has been extended until midnight tonight. Procrastinators need to make sure in the rush to beat the deadline that they don’t make these common mistakes that the IRS and tax professionals see. Before sending off your return: —    Make sure you put the correct Social Security number, and that you haven’t accidently transposed numbers. —    If you’re old fashioned and file a paper return,  check your figures.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Tax season is officially here, with the Internal Revenue Service and state of Maryland starting Tuesday to accept electronically filed returns. This is a good year for procrastinators. April 15 — the traditional due date for returns — falls on a Sunday and the following Monday is Emancipation Day, a holiday celebrated in Washington. This pushes the deadline to April 17. But this is also a leap year, so Feb. 29 gives us one more day to ponder our taxes. Many filers could use the extra time.
BUSINESS
By Phillip Robinson and Phillip Robinson,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 22, 1993
What's the most common mistake on a tax form? Math errors. But computers don't make such errors.What's the most common problem in filing a tax return? Not having the form. But computers can store electronic copies of a thousand different forms, and print one whenever you need it.What's the biggest headache in completing forms? Figuring out what goes where from the convoluted instructions. But computers can automatically copy the result on line 37B of Page 2 to line 16A on Page 1, and then automatically make changes to either line if they're affected by anything else.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | February 14, 2000
So you think you have it bad this tax season? Don't cry on this shoulder, pal. I've had to do my returns three times this year, but such is the life of a software reviewer: Sometimes you play games, sometimes you do your taxes. Again, and again, and again. That's because this year the two heavyweights of personal tax software -- Intuit's TurboTax and Block Financial Corp.'s TaxCut -- finally have some competition. To round out its personal finance titles, Microsoft has launched TaxSaver, a surprisingly robust first effort from a company that usually doesn't get things right until Version 3.0. (Macintosh users still have only Intuit's MacInTax or Block Financial's TaxCut for Mac.)
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Tax season is officially here, with the Internal Revenue Service and state of Maryland starting Tuesday to accept electronically filed returns. This is a good year for procrastinators. April 15 — the traditional due date for returns — falls on a Sunday and the following Monday is Emancipation Day, a holiday celebrated in Washington. This pushes the deadline to April 17. But this is also a leap year, so Feb. 29 gives us one more day to ponder our taxes. Many filers could use the extra time.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | January 31, 2010
This might be the tax season where even die-hard do-it-yourselfers break down and hire a preparer, or at the very least invest in some tax software. n Taxes are more complicated than usual with all the new deductions and credits created last year to stimulate the economy. And in some instances, Congress went back to revise and expand the tax breaks. The popular home buyer credit, for instance, is on its third version. n "You can't just sit down with last year's return and make sure you fill in the same lines and think you got everything coming to you," says Harris Abrams, a senior tax analyst with Thomson Reuter's Tax & Accounting.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tibune Media Services | March 25, 2007
Before I realized it, I was done filling out our 2006 income tax return. Rather than tackle the whole thing at once, I did it bit by bit, entering the information as I received it (for example, how much my wife, Georgina, and I made in dividends from our mutual funds and how much of it qualified for a preferred tax rate). By using tax-preparation software, I could work on any part of the return I chose without getting confused. The program makes all the computations and adjusts any previous entries based on new information.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | March 14, 1994
No matter how you define your race, creed, color, sex, religion or national origin, you have something in common with your fellow Americans this time of year. You're sweating out your taxes.I would love to tell you that your computer can take the pain out of filing your tax return. It won't. The sting of the bottom line will be as nasty as ever.But today's tax preparation software can make the job much easier -- and it's so sophisticated that you won't even have to look at a tax form until yours comes out of your printer.
NEWS
April 18, 2011
Because of Emancipation Day, a holiday that celebrates the freeing of slaves in D.C., the traditional tax deadline has been extended until midnight tonight. Procrastinators need to make sure in the rush to beat the deadline that they don’t make these common mistakes that the IRS and tax professionals see. Before sending off your return: —    Make sure you put the correct Social Security number, and that you haven’t accidently transposed numbers. —    If you’re old fashioned and file a paper return,  check your figures.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | January 31, 2010
This might be the tax season where even die-hard do-it-yourselfers break down and hire a preparer, or at the very least invest in some tax software. n Taxes are more complicated than usual with all the new deductions and credits created last year to stimulate the economy. And in some instances, Congress went back to revise and expand the tax breaks. The popular home buyer credit, for instance, is on its third version. n "You can't just sit down with last year's return and make sure you fill in the same lines and think you got everything coming to you," says Harris Abrams, a senior tax analyst with Thomson Reuter's Tax & Accounting.
BUSINESS
By Mark Schwanhausser and Mark Schwanhausser,San Jose Mercury News | February 28, 2008
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Few Americans relish the annual chore of preparing their tax returns. Two out of three taxpayers, including me, simply hand the job to a pro. But that still leaves more than 50 million do-it-yourself die-hards. If you count yourself among them, you face a growing set of taxing decisions before you even pick up an IRS instruction booklet: Should you use software or stick to pencil and calculator? If you turn to software, should you pop a disk into your PC or complete it online?
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2003
Antonius Kusuma isn't a novice with computers. He maintains them for a living for the brokerage giant Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc. So when he popped the tax-preparation software TurboTax into his computer at his Bordentown, N.J., home recently, he expected to complete his federal 2002 return without a problem. Three hours later, he abandoned the effort in exasperation -- and his choice words didn't even include the letters "IRS." "I was not able to activate my TurboTax even though it was the first time I installed it," Kusuma, 37, wrote in a complaint he posted to amazon.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2002
My friend and I each have substantial amounts of cash. My balances are in the five digits, while my friend has more than $100,000. Our problem is that we owe substantial amounts to the IRS and other tax agencies. We want to park this cash someplace where it will be safe and we have access to it, but where the IRS can't find it. Please don't advise me to resolve my tax problems. I tried, and it's impossible! Baloney. Your issues - whatever they are - can be resolved, as soon as you abandon the idea that you can somehow hide your assets from the IRS. Find an attorney who specializes in solving tax problems and hire him or her. Your local bar association can offer referrals.
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