Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTax Reform
IN THE NEWS

Tax Reform

NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 15, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In a time-tested show of political theater, Republican leaders will dump the entire U.S. tax code into Boston Harbor today, as though confident that tax reform will soon make the loathsome load a thing of the past.But unlike the crates of tea jettisoned by Colonial patriots, the tax books will be attached to a strong tether. And once the cameras switch off and the crowds dissipate, workmen will haul all 101,295 pages back from the deep, proving symbolically what Washington knows full well: Neither the politicians nor the public are ready to bury the tax system just yet."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Grover Q. Norquist | November 21, 2004
THE GOAL of tax reform is to tax income one time at one rate. Today, the federal government taxes you when you earn a dollar, when you save it, when you invest it. And if you invest it in a company, they tax the company's earnings. And if the company pays you a dividend, they tax that. And if your home or stocks appreciate in value, they tax that "capital gain." And if you are stupid enough to die, they take as much as half again. Our goal is to reduce the complexity, intrusiveness and expense of the present federal income tax structure by taxing income one time at one single rate.
NEWS
April 6, 2006
Governor to sign bill on stem cells today Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. has scheduled a ceremony for this morning to sign a bill that would allow the state to use tax dollars for stem cell research. Del. Peter A. Hammen, a key proponent of the legislation, said he was invited yesterday to the event by an aide to the governor. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael E. Busch also have been invited, Hammen said. "I'm just very delighted to see that the governor is signing the bill," said Hammen, a Baltimore Democrat.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 25, 1991
Two restrictive abortion bills introduced by Senate Minority Leader John A. Cade received endorsements from nearly two-thirds of Anne Arundel's lawmakers yesterday.Cade, a Severna Park Republican, proposed a bill Monday night that would prohibit abortions used for birth control or as a means of sex selection and would regulate abortion clinics. The second bill would require minors to receive parental consent before having an abortion.They are almost identical to legislation Cade introduced last year.
NEWS
August 20, 2004
SIMPLIFY THE TAX CODE! End taxation of savings! Cut taxes! What handy buttons to push for election-year supporters of President Bush, like House Speaker Dennis Hastert. After all, who warms to the IRS, the complexity of filing taxes, paying taxes on savings or higher tax bills? And if you don't ponder the facts too deeply, the GOP almost succeeds in wrapping its tax "reform" agenda in a populist cloak. Let folks keep more of the fruits of their labor! It's their hard-earned money, not the government's!
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | May 14, 1991
The annual report card from the Maryland Food Committee may merit prominent display on Gov. William Donald Schaefer's refrigerator.Grades for fighting hunger were up and the state received its first A-minus ever. The governor gets extra credit, as the report card notes that the administration's efforts in fighting hunger were a grade above the legislature's.The statewide anti-hunger group, which was to release the report card at a news conference today, gave the state a B-minus overall, noting in teacher-style rhetoric: "Making progress but has not reached potential."
NEWS
By Staff report | September 20, 1990
Local tax rebels had their day in the state's highest court yesterday, pressing for a ruling that would place a charter proposal to roll back property taxes on the November ballot.In calling for the Court of Appeals to reverse a lower court ruling removing two proposed charter amendments from the November ballot, a lawyer for the Anne Arundel Taxpayers for Responsive Government invoked the First Amendment right of the people to petition government for "redress of grievances."AATRG is appealing county Circuit Judge Bruce C. Williams' Aug. 27 ruling that the tax reform referendum is unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | July 17, 1991
With legislative committees already embarked on a summertime study of the state's tax system, four statewide business groups announced yesterday that they have formed a council to ensure that their voices are heard before a tax reform bill is written and presented to the General Assembly next year.The Business Fiscal Policy Council, which is chaired by former U.S. Sen. J. Glenn Beall and includes two members each from the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, the Greater Baltimore Committee, Maryland Economic Growth Associates and the Greater Washington Board of Trade, will "help state legislators take a business-like approach in considering changing tax laws," said Chamber of Commerce Chairman Ronald Creamer.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Editor, On Tuesday, Americans were able to gather around their TVs to watch the State of the Union Address given by President Obama as he outlines his legislative agenda for 2014, and beyond. Based upon Obama's current approval polls, the choice may be listening to him or tuning into "Moonshiners" or "The Simpson's Movie," which could be more appealing. Of course, to be a good patriot one should listen to the speech. They're sort of like holding a painted Russian Easter egg: pretty on the outside but empty on the inside.
NEWS
April 2, 1991
Crafting a budget acceptable to the governor and two houses of the legislature is always an accomplishment. But with state revenues plunging, the budget process has cast a longer shadow than usual over this year's General Assembly session. In a sluggish economy, a stripped-down budget is inevitable -- even desirable. But instead of embracing broad visions like those embodied in the Linowes proposal, this legislature will be remembered for just saying no -- not merely to spending for ambitious new projects but also to transportation tax measures necessary to keep up the state's infrastructure and tax reform to maintain the level of services and bolster prospects for a prosperous future.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.