Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTax Reform
IN THE NEWS

Tax Reform

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Since we're talking about the meaning of fairness in taxation, how about a fixed, flat rate? This would be akin to the biblical tithe, where God asks a fixed, flat 10 percent a year, year in and year out, no exemptions, no exceptions, no deductions. If the flock has a good year, then God has a good year, and vice versa. Whether one is 8 or 80 years old, everyone can understand it, and no one needs an accountant to figure it out. If it's good enough for God, it ought to be good enough for Caesar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 12, 2014
With Tuesday's decision to bring to a vote an increase in the nation's debt limit without any conditions, House Speaker John Boehner reasserted himself as the pivotal figure in a badly divided Washington. He demonstrated again that he is able and willing to go against the wishes of the extremists in his caucus when he determines it to be in the nation's and/or Republican Party's long-term interests, and once again, he appears unlikely to pay much of a price. That doesn't mean we should expect a golden era of bipartisan deal making, but it does suggest the prospect of action on the nation's most pressing issues during the remainder of President Barack Obama's term is not entirely bleak.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Americans could scarcely be blamed for viewing any proposal to "simplify" taxes with skepticism. From Steve Forbes' flat tax of 1996 to Herman Cain's recent 9-9-9 proposal, efforts to make taxes simpler have usually meant - at least when held up to closer scrutiny - shifting the budgetary burden from the rich to the working class. But what President Barack Obama revealed today appears to be a far more reasonable attempt to reduce the nation's corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 28 percent (and allowing manufacturers an even lower 25 percent)
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Editor, On Tuesday, Americans were able to gather around their TVs to watch the State of the Union Address given by President Obama as he outlines his legislative agenda for 2014, and beyond. Based upon Obama's current approval polls, the choice may be listening to him or tuning into "Moonshiners" or "The Simpson's Movie," which could be more appealing. Of course, to be a good patriot one should listen to the speech. They're sort of like holding a painted Russian Easter egg: pretty on the outside but empty on the inside.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Greater Baltimore Committee said Wednesday that it will organize a private-sector commission to study Maryland's tax structure after dozens of local CEOs named tax reform the top priority for making the state more business friendly. The GBC, a business and civic leadership organization, said it surveyed more than 250 chief executives and conducted workshops across the region to hear business leaders' thoughts on how to increase Maryland's economic competitiveness. "Tax structure was the No. 1 - that's the one they consistently hear about, talk about, hear from others outside this state," said Donald C. Fry, the GBC's president.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
NEWS
By John Coggin | October 10, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley is planning to resume his fight for comprehensive tax reform during next year's regular legislative session. He is wise to do so. The business of fixing Maryland's structural deficit is unfinished. The projected budget shortfall is expected to exceed $1 billion for fiscal year 2013. To ensure that this new possible bid for tax reform fares better than his previous attempt in 2007, Mr. O'Malley should prepare a new strategy now. He should begin by studying the approach that Mark R. Warner took in 2004 to master Virginia's budget problems.
NEWS
January 7, 2008
Baltimore suffers from a difficult conjunction of financial maladies: the highest property tax rate in Maryland, the greatest concentration of poverty in the region and a big swath of tax-exempt property (fully one-third of its taxable base). The best way to lower the tax rate would be to enlarge the tax base, but unfortunately, the best way to enlarge the base is to lower the rate. It's not a vicious circle, exactly, but it's one that's very difficult to break into. What's the city to do?
NEWS
June 17, 1991
After declaring a Schaefer administration tax package "dead on arrival" earlier this year, General Assembly leaders now are resuscitating the notion of tax reform. If deliberations proceed on schedule, there could be broad consensus on a tax package to present to the 1992 legislative session.What a change in attitude! The cries of "no more taxes" from legislators have died down, perhaps because of the pounding Maryland's treasury has taken from the recession. House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have spent much of the last six months scrambling to balance the state budget, which has been thrown into chaos by the continuing plunge in revenues.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 24, 2013
Typical daily schedule for a member of the United States Congress: •8:30 a.m. - National Wind Energy Association: to discuss wind production tax credit. •10 a.m. - National Association of Manufacturers: to discuss accelerated depreciation schedules and corporate income tax. •11 a.m. - National Association of Realtors: to discuss home mortgage deduction and capital gains exclusion on home sales. •1 p.m. - The Alliance for Charitable Reform, National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, American Cancer Society, Muscular Dystrophy Association: to discuss enhanced funding for National Institutes of Health and federal charitable deduction.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake attempted to quiet growing calls from the City Council for an independent audit of the city's troubled property tax program, saying Tuesday that her administration's reforms should be given more time to yield results. "We're not against audits," she said at a news conference. "We just want to make sure they're done in a timely way and are not wasteful of the taxpayers' money. " The mayor's comments came a day before a council hearing on a resolution seeking an "immediate and thorough" audit of the Finance Department.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
The Greater Baltimore Committee said Wednesday that it will organize a private-sector commission to study Maryland's tax structure after dozens of local CEOs named tax reform the top priority for making the state more business friendly. The GBC, a business and civic leadership organization, said it surveyed more than 250 chief executives and conducted workshops across the region to hear business leaders' thoughts on how to increase Maryland's economic competitiveness. "Tax structure was the No. 1 - that's the one they consistently hear about, talk about, hear from others outside this state," said Donald C. Fry, the GBC's president.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 12, 2013
Conservative Republicans in our nation's capital have managed to accomplish something they only dreamed of when tea partiers streamed into Congress at the start of 2011. They've basically shut down Congress. Their refusal to compromise is working just as they hoped: No jobs agenda. No budget. No grand bargain on the deficit. No background checks on guns. Nothing on climate change. No tax reform. No hike in the minimum wage. Nothing so far on immigration reform. It's as if an entire branch of the federal government -- the branch that's supposed to deal directly with the nation's problems, not just execute the law or interpret the law but make the law -- has gone out of business, leaving behind only a so-called "sequester" that's cutting deeper and deeper into education, infrastructure, programs for the nation's poor, and national defense.
NEWS
By Chickie Grayson | April 24, 2013
America is in the midst of an affordable housing crisis - Baltimore, too. Ten million families are paying more than 50 percent of their monthly income on rent, a severe cost burden that leaves little for food and other necessities. Over 32,000 applicants (and counting) are on the Housing Authority of Baltimore City's waiting lists. Public housing authorities can only do so much. With limited, dwindling public resources, private dollars are needed now more than ever to help create affordable housing.
NEWS
April 4, 2013
As a post-World War II political activist, candidate, office holder and Republican supporter for the past 67 years, I have always believed in the two-party system of Republicans and Democrats. I believe in a political system consisting of "big tent" Republican and Democratic parties that, among other things, consist of liberals, conservatives and independent voters. However, for the past 40 years, the zealots in each party have rejected the emphasis on united parties in favor of fragmented "leftist" and "rightist" principles.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1994
With his thick glasses, wispy graying hair, and rumpled seersucker suit jacket, Steven Cord hardly cuts the figure of the rebel.But the cause the Columbia resident has championed for almost two decades is downright revolutionary, dry and arcane as it may be: property tax reform for municipalities.Specifically, Mr. Cord and the obscure organization he heads, the Henry George Foundation, have been pushing for elected officials across the country to let towns and cities set different property tax rates for land and buildings.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 2, 2005
Hurricane Katrina couldn't do it. Three-dollar gas couldn't do it. Alan Greenspan hasn't done it, although he's trying harder than ever. None of them has stopped the U.S. economy, which is chugging along, slowly creating jobs and spreading prosperity. What's going to cause the next recession? Cue the President's Advisory Panel on Federal Tax Reform. With laser precision, the panel aimed its biggest tax-reform bullet at the industry that almost single-handedly has kept the economy afloat for years: residential housing.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | March 24, 2013
Typical daily schedule for a member of the United States Congress: •8:30 a.m. - National Wind Energy Association: to discuss wind production tax credit. •10 a.m. - National Association of Manufacturers: to discuss accelerated depreciation schedules and corporate income tax. •11 a.m. - National Association of Realtors: to discuss home mortgage deduction and capital gains exclusion on home sales. •1 p.m. - The Alliance for Charitable Reform, National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, American Cancer Society, Muscular Dystrophy Association: to discuss enhanced funding for National Institutes of Health and federal charitable deduction.
NEWS
By Ben Cardin | February 19, 2013
If Congress fails to deal with the looming threat of sequestration, March 1 will be devastating for millions of Americans. That will be the day that automatic, across-the-board spending cuts begin to take effect - cutting $1.2 trillion from defense and nondefense programs over the next 10 years. Sequestration was scheduled to take effect Jan. 1, but the American Taxpayer Relief Act delayed it until March 1. Time is running out, and we must find a way to work together to reduce our deficit and avoid sequestration.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.