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By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | September 23, 1994
TOKYO -- The Japanese Cabinet, in a move long urged by the United States, passed a major tax reform package late last night, providing a boost to the country's depressed economy.Theoretically, the tax cut will enable Japanese consumers to buy more foreign goods, thus reducing the yawning trade deficit it has with the United States and other nations.Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama announced the tax package at a news conference, as the U.S.-Japan trade talks try to avert punitive U.S. sanctions on Japan, set for the end of the month.
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By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Fifth in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. When he campaigns in residential areas, Democrat Douglas F. Gansler practically sprints from door to door. He's trying to meet as many voters as he can. But it can appear he is chasing somebody. Which, metaphorically, he is. With the June 24 primary for governor approaching, Gansler, 51, trails Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown in the polls and is playing a role that suits the state attorney general's personality - the scrappy challenger.
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NEWS
December 22, 1996
MARYLAND'S Board of Revenue Estimates has sent a mixed message to Gov. Parris N. Glendening. The state's economy is slowly strengthening, the board concluded last week, but don't expect the pace to quicken. Look for "steady, but unspectacular" increases in jobs and in tax revenue from now through the year 2001.This state is inching ahead on the economic front at less than half the rate of high-growth years. New jobs are being added at about 1.4 percent a year -- a pittance compared with a decade ago. Tax revenues over the next two years will rise only about 3.3 percent.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
When Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman unveiled her proposed $1.35 billion county budget on Thursday, she described it as a package that reduced the county's property tax rate "without cutting essential services or depleting our savings. " But in a political year that has already seen sharp barbs between Neuman and her opponent for the Republican nomination for county executive, Del. Steve Schuh, the tax rate issue immediately drew a rebuke from Schuh, who called the cut "inadequate and misleading.
NEWS
July 23, 1999
CONGRESSIONAL Republicans are struggling to pass a tax cut the economy doesn't need and taxpayers are not clamoring for. With President Clinton also proposing a $250-billion targeted cut, it's clear these proposals are nothing more than the candy politicians love to pass out before elections.The assumption underlying these proposals is that the federal government will realize a $3 trillion surplus over the next decade. While the economy has been performing extremely well for the past nine years, it is presumptuous to assume that the current recovery will last another 10 years.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1996
House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. pledged yesterday to push for a 10 percent cut in personal income taxes over three years, saying he believes it can be done without raising other taxes to compensate for the loss of revenue.Taylor, a conservative Democrat from Western Maryland who is regarded as a possible candidate for governor, said the tax cut is necessary for the economic well-being of the state. He noted it is also a "top priority for the business community.""This is being put forth as a very simple, uncomplicated income tax reduction program.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 6, 1998
With Maryland enjoying a robust economy and a healthy budget surplus, a key senator is proposing that the state accelerate the income tax cut passed last year to give taxpayers quicker relief.Sen. Barbara A. Hoffman, chairman of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, said yesterday it might be fiscally feasible to reduce the phase-in period for the tax cut from five to three years."I really think a good use of that [state budget] surplus would be to accelerate the tax reduction to the citizens," said Hoffman, a Baltimore Democrat.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening's decision not to seek a tax cut in the budget he presents to the General Assembly next week is drawing a mixed reaction from business executives and Republican legislators.Several GOP lawmakers said yesterday the governor seemed poised to renege on last year's pledge to reduce personal income taxes, a step that some argue is vital to improving Maryland's economy."The governor has been waffling on the tax cut for the past two months," said Senate Minority Leader John A. Cade, an Anne Arundel County Republican.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and David Folkenflik and Thomas W. Waldron and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | November 20, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening called yesterday for a 10 percent cut in the state's personal income tax rate, a move aimed at boosting the sluggish Maryland economy and spreading some goodwill among voters.On a Christmas-comes-early day in state government, Glendening also proposed an ambitious new scholarship program that would provide free college tuition for thousands of middle-class Marylanders.And administration officials said the governor intends to give the state police a pay raise of about 10 percent in the budget he will submit to the General Assembly in January.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 11, 1992
Don summoned the legislators to Annapolis again. He must like them.And now for the important issues, like what school Chelsea will attend, whose dresses Hillary will fill and where Bill will play golf.Bill called an economic summit to tell him how to reconcile campaign pledges about deficit reduction, tax reduction and growth stimulation. No one knows how.If we don't buy French white wine, they will retaliate against our soda pop.Arkansas has the worst public health but now other states can be expected to catch up.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
From the Blog From the Baltimore Sun Op-Ed Page Brian Griffiths writes about Baltimore's recent mayors and how  none of them have their focus on where it belongs: Baltimore . Red Maryland endorses Hough Red Maryland has  unanimously endorsed Del. Michael Hough's primary challenge  to Senate Minority Leader David Brinkley. Red Maryland News Director Duane Keenan scored exclusive interviews with Senator Brinkley and Delegate Hough for this week's episode of the  Red Maryland News Hour . An Open Door for Tax Hikes Unfortunately it looks like  guberntorial candidate Charles Lollar has left the door open to raise your taxes  if he is elected governor.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Maryland Republican legislative leaders vowed Tuesday to make tax reduction, including repeal of the so-called "rain tax," their top priority for the 90-day General Assembly session that begins Wednesday. After a briefing at which GOP lawmakers were told that the state's tax burden is driving affluent taxpayers to move elsewhere, the party's House and Senate leaders said they would push for everything from an across-the-board income tax cut to targeted relief for small businesses.
NEWS
December 26, 2012
Visitors to Ocean City are often struck by the contrasting fortunes of the vacant Ocean Plaza Mall on 94 t h Street and the bustle of development along U.S. 50 in West Ocean City , with its new Walmart and other big-box stores. There are a number of reasons for this, but one in particular sticks in the resort town's collective craw: double taxation. In essence, property owners in Ocean City have been subsidizing sprawl development outside town limits, a self-destructive policy that can only be described as dumb growth.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
The Baltimore City Council on Monday granted preliminary approval to more than $20 million in tax breaks for the long-stalled "Superblock" development. The council's unanimous vote provides for $22.1 million in tax breaks to the developer, Lexington Square Partners LLC. A vote for final approval is expected Thursday. "Hopefully, this project will reignite the growth of the central business district," said City Councilman Carl Stokes, who spoke in favor of the development. Lexington Square Partners has promised local hiring initiatives and profit-sharing with the city, Stokes said.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
Dan Rodricks ' column, "Voting to give more money to millionaires," (Oct. 21) was right on point. While middle class wages have remained stagnant over the last 20 years, the top 2 percent have seen their incomes triple (with both groups adjusted for inflation). Republicans say higher taxes on the wealthy kill jobs. In 2001, George W. Bush spearheaded the largest tax reduction in U.S. history (overwhelmingly benefiting our wealthiest citizens) and unemployment rates quickly spiked higher and have remained nearly double the Clinton era levels to this day. When were the golden years of U.S. full employment?
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies and a high temperature near 81 degrees. Showers are likely before 8 a.m. There is also a chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon. Tonight is expected to be mostly cloudy, with a low around 62 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM LAST NIGHT... Pit bull ruling concerns dog and property owners : The Maryland Court of Appeals' decision that the breed is inherently dangerous could have far-reaching implications for landlords and dog owners who rent, experts said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater | March 29, 2012
A City Council committee on Wednesday approved Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's property tax reduction plan, which relies on projected revenue from gambling. Banking on income from a future slots location, the plan would reduce Baltimore's property tax rate by 20 cents by 2020 for Baltimore homeowners. According to the mayor's office, the plan would give an owner-occupied home, valued at $200,000, an annual tax reduction of $40 next year. That reduction would grow to $400 by 2020. Caesars Entertainment, the leading bidder for a slots parlor in Baltimore, earlier this month gave lawmakers explicit assurances that their company will not abandon the city for Prince George's County if the General Assembly approves a casino there.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
The City Council on Monday approved Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's property tax reduction plan, which relies on projected revenue from gambling. “I want to thank Council President Bernard 'Jack' Young and members of the City Council for giving relief to city homeowners,” Rawlings-Blake said in a statement. Banking on income from a future slots location, the plan would reduce Baltimore's property tax rate by 20 cents by 2020 for Baltimore homeowners. According to the mayor's office, the plan would give an owner-occupied home, valued at $200,000, an annual tax reduction of $40 next year.
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