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Tax Proposals

NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush ventured into enemy territory yesterday, meeting with Senate Democrats to outline his hopes for his first year in office. Later in the day, in a speech to Republican members of Congress at a retreat in Williamsburg, Va., he vowed to make the case for deep tax cuts "over and over again" until Americans are convinced that his plan would help the middle class and act as a remedy for economic slowdown. Bush's spokesman said the Democrats, who met with Bush behind closed doors, listened politely but were "tentative and silent" during his 12-minute speech, which was followed by a brief question-and-answer period.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
A whopping budget battle is shaping up in Annapolis, where the leaders of the House of Delegates and Senate floated widely divergent proposals Friday to raise income taxes as part of a plan to close a $1 billion shortfall. The Senate is considering a measure that would raise the income tax for almost every Marylander by a quarter of a percent, effectively rolling back a tax cut made 15 years ago, key senators said. The House is looking at a plan that would hit the top 7 percent to 10 percent of earners with a steep increase but leave everyone else alone, said House SpeakerMichael E. Busch.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2012
If you hold a gathering of more than 50 boats in Maryland waters after June 1, you can expect to pay a "marine gathering permit fee" — the amount yet to be determined — under legislation proposed by the O'Malley administration. Need a certified copy of a marriage certificate? The cost would double from $12 to $24 under an administration proposal. Own a commercial scale with a capacity of more than a ton? The fee for registering it would increase from $75 to $100 under a bill submitted by the state Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
In its editorial on the Senate committee recommendations on the state budget ("A costly breakthrough?" March 13) The Sun recognizes the responsible, balanced approach of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, then asks "whether all this might be accomplished with less sacrifice from taxpayers. " Let's put this in perspective. The committee's tax plan costs the median Maryland household $41 a year - less than a buck a week. Even at the upper reaches of high income taxpayers, it's well under one-fifth of 1 percent of income.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Callers to The Evening Sun's SUNDIAL support reducing property taxes, but they don't like the specific changes proposed by the Linowes Commission.Of the 454 people who called, 76 percent [345 callers] agree that property taxes should be reduced, while 24 percent [106 callers] disagreed.Only 34 percent [155 callers] support increasing the sales tax, while 66 percent [298 callers] oppose the idea. The idea of expanding the sales tax to include cigarettes and services was opposed 70 percent [316 callers]
NEWS
By John W. Frece | November 25, 1990
Annapolis The Linowes commission report could not have arrived at a much worse time.Three years ago, when Gov. William Donald Schaefer set up the blue-ribbon commission to analyze Maryland's tax system, no one could have guessed that, just as the commission's recommendations were being made public, the United States would be edging toward war in the Middle East.Nor could anyone have known that the national and state economies would be in a tailspin, that the price of oil would have soared, that unemployment and inflation would be inching up, that the state budget would be in the red, or that the federal government would be about to raise taxes to offset a portion of its huge deficit.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot came out swinging Tuesday against Gov.Martin O'Malley's proposal to apply the state's 6 percent sales tax to gasoline, denouncing it as a "shot to the gut" of middle-class consumers and small businesses. As expected, the comptroller used a roundtable he staged in Annapolis to showcase the petroleum industry's objections to any gas tax increase in general and to the sales tax  on fuel in particular. The event put even more distance than already existed between Franchot and O'Malley, a fellow Democrat.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
In spite of the chilly reception his proposed increase in gasolines taxes has received from legislators, Gov. Martin O'Malley is planning to put his personal prestige on the line by testifying in favor of his transportation revenue bill Wednesday afternoon. O'Malley is scheduled to make a pitch for his plan to apply the state's 6 percent sales tax to gasoline to a joint hearing of the House Environmental Matters and Ways & Means committees. The revenue measure, which is separate from the General Assembly's budget deliberations, would direct money to the state's depleted Transportation Trust Fund to help chip away at a backlog of road and transit projects.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malleyis pushing legislation that would "effectively double" the Bay Restoration Fee or "flush tax," ("EPA gives mixed grades on Chesapeake Bay cleanup. " Feb. 19). Senate Bill 240 raises the fee from $30 to $60 per year on septic system users. However, metered sewer customers will pay according to their usage; $1.80 for the first 2,000 gallons and $1.25 for every 1,000 gallons thereafter per month. This will result in many Marylanders paying considerably more than double the current $30 fee. Any metered customer using more than 5,000 gallons per month (check your latest bill)
BUSINESS
By David Conn | December 14, 1990
The chairman of the Maryland Commission on Taxes and Tax Structure tried yesterday to deflect charges that now is not the right time to consider the commission's radical tax-restructuring proposals, in light of the state's growing economic and financial problems.The commission's report would shift some of the burdens of taxation away from individuals and jurisdictions less able to pay, and in the process would raise more than $800 million in new taxes in the first year.But Chairman R. Robert Linowes, a Montgomery County lawyer, while sensitive to the deepening recession in which the state appears to be mired, said the report should be considered apart from short-term economic concerns.
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