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NEWS
December 26, 2011
After reading the editorial "The GOP tax hike" (Dec. 22), an obvious question came to mind: How is it that not approving an extension of the Obama payroll tax cut is evil and anyone against extending it must be certifiably insane, yet when Obama wanted to end the so-called "Bush tax cuts" he was doing the right thing? I think that perhaps there may be a slight bias in your thought processes. Ed Roth, Ellicott
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
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NEWS
March 18, 2012
Disinclined as we may be to pity the plight of those making more than $500,000 a year, the state Senate, in its attempt to raise more revenue from such top earners, has gone too far. The Senate has adopted a plan that appears to be unique among the 50 states and would violate a cardinal rule of income tax policy, which is that a dollar earned should not cost more than a dollar in taxes. When the House of Delegates takes up the budget, it will have some work to do to clean this mess up. Gov.Martin O'Malleyproposed what remains the most sensible plan for raising new revenue through the income tax. Rather than changing the rates, his plan was to phase out some exemptions and deductions for the top 20 percent of Maryland earners.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
"If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. " That little nugget of truth, also known as the "law of the instrument," can be applied to more than just tool selection. When it comes to some closely-held beliefs, people tend to see circumstances as frequently proving them correct - even when they do nothing of the kind. At least that might explain why a recently-released Gallup poll finding that 47 percent of Maryland residents would choose to move if they could - the third highest percentage among the states - is being cited by many as evidence of failed tax policy.
NEWS
By Drew Greenblatt | September 6, 2010
This Labor Day finds almost 17 percent of Americans unemployed or no longer looking for work. We must get them into the economy. They are prevented from working by government policies, and that is just not fair. Plus, we need them to help us handle our global competitors. Our country needs to create an economic and educational culture that welcomes our unemployed back in the fold and makes it easy for companies to invest in equipment that will lead to growth. What is the problem?
NEWS
November 17, 1991
Dedicating tax revenues to specific government activities is all the rage among special-interest groups. But it is dreadful tax policy that should be resisted strongly by legislators.Backers of the state's shock-trauma system want a new "trauma tax" earmarked exclusively for preserving and enlarging emergency medical services. Supporters of the University of Maryland College Park want to cut funds for mass transit and road building and dedicate that tax money instead to college campuses. The Maryland Higher Education Commission wants to go even further, seeking higher business taxes to protect community colleges from recessionary budget cuts.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 29, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Federal Reserve policy-makers might raise interest rates again because the U.S. economy could be growing too quickly, raising the risk that inflation is likely to accelerate, Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan told the Senate Banking Committee yesterday in the second of his semiannual reports on the economy and monetary policy.Greenspan, however, offered little elaboration on his warning -- identical to one he gave the House Banking Committee last week -- because senators were more interested in dragging the central bank head into an argument over tax policy.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
Howard County may be one of Maryland's wealthiest places, but up to 15,000 residents don't have health insurance, thousands need drug treatment, child abuse cases are at a high level and social services staffing is down by one-third. Those disparities sparked a debate on tax policy among several legislators at a breakfast yesterday sponsored by the Association of Community Services, an umbrella group of local social service agencies trying to negotiate their way through Maryland's budget crisis.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
In addressing the so-called "fiscal cliff" of tax increases and deep spending cuts, President Obama needs to hold firm in letting the tax breaks for the wealthy expire ("Obama talks tough," Nov. 15). This is a matter of fairness on tax policy that he stressed during the campaign. Exit polling showed that 60 percent of the electorate support higher taxes for the wealthy. That's where Congress should start in working out a balanced approach to keeping the country from going off the "fiscal cliff.
NEWS
April 30, 1996
WITH THE APRIL 15 filing deadline, many American couples discovered again that taking on a legal commitment to each other can cost dearly at tax time.The "marriage penalty" doesn't hit every couple, but why should it hit any? Tax policy has profound social consequences, and the effects of failing marriages -- and of the failure of parents to marry -- are taking a heavy toll at all levels of society.The "marriage tax" is felt largely by two-income couples, increasing their tax burden beyond what it would be if they remained single.
NEWS
Johannes Schmidt | May 2, 2014
In recent weeks, the web has been buzzing with excitement over Palcohol, the powdered alcohol that can turn water into vodka, rum or any one of four specialty cocktails. While it remains unclear when - or if - the product will hit stores, due in part to some backtracking by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB), states including Vermont and Minnesota are already moving to ban it. In early April, the TTB granted Palcohol label approval, then rescinded it roughly two weeks later, according to Bevlaw.com, a blog maintained by the Lehrman Beverage Law firm in Virginia.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
From the Baltimore Sun op-ed page       Mark Newgent writes about education, nothing that with huge achievement gaps in our schools public education needs fundamental reforms .       Red Maryland Poll Still Open   The Red Maryland February Poll remains open until 9 PM this Wednesday. Click here  to participate. Results will be announced live on this Thursday's edition of Red Maryland Radio .       The Media Matters Mancrush   A Media Matters writer continues his obsession with Red Maryland .     Charles Lollar further proves his lack of seriousness In what can best be described as an unorthodox move, Republican gubernatorial candidate Charles Lollar attacked Republican legislators on tax policy despite not having a well-thought out tax policy of his own.     Meanwhile the Lollar Campaign won a straw poll in Montgomery County on Saturday, after which hilarity ensued .     A Lack of Accountability   The Democrats are continuing to dodge responsibility over this Obamacare fiasco, which is why they have been dodgy on holding hearings into the sordid mess.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Advocates of legalizing marijuana launched their effort Thursday to change the law in Maryland, calling the war on drugs a failure and pointing to growing public support for their cause. A handful of Maryland lawmakers hope to push the state in the direction of Colorado, where recreational use of pot is regulated and taxed like alcohol. Advocates say that would generate about $150 million in tax dollars for Maryland each year. Supporters compared the changing public attitude toward legalizing marijuana to the more recent embrace of same-sex marriage and the rejection of Prohibition policies more than 80 years ago. "Continuation of the current policy is continuation of failure," said state Sen. Jamie Raskin, a constitutional law professor at American University and a lead sponsor of the legalization effort.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur is proposing an income tax cut for about 90 percent of the state's taxpayers — to be financed by imposing a higher rate on wealthy Marylanders. At a news conference Wednesday in Annapolis, Mizeur also rolled out an economic plan that calls for a minimum "living wage" that would reach $16.70 by 2022. Mizeur, a two-term delegate from Montgomery County, released the most comprehensive income tax plan announced so far by any of the Democratic or Republican gubernatorial candidates.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
After T. Rowe Price executives recapped last year's highlights at Tuesday's annual meeting, a shareholder raised concerns about the loss of a top money manager, competition from exchange-traded funds and an Obama Administration tax proposal that could dampen Price's retirement business. President and CEO James A. C. Kennedy said that Kris Jenner, the former manager of T. Rowe Price Health Sciences Fund, left "millions" in deferred compensation on the table by leaving the company in February.
NEWS
By Gary Jobson | March 7, 2013
The General Assembly has an opportunity this year to give a big boost to Maryland's struggling marine industry while also generating additional tax revenues for the fund responsible for upkeep and improvements to the region's waterways. It's time us to place a cap on the state's boat excise tax. Over the past few years, Maryland has fallen behind our competitor states up and down the East Coast when it comes to how much of a boat's value should be subject to an excise tax. Neither Delaware nor Rhode Island has a tax. Virginia has long had a cap, limiting boat owners to paying no more than $2,000 in an excise tax, and Florida passed a cap three years ago. Not surprisingly, Marylanders who own bigger and more expensive boats are increasingly choosing to register them in other states.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 16, 2006
As millions of Americans rush to meet the deadline for reporting how much tax they owe on last year's income, a stealth tax increase has begun eating into the 2006 income of nearly 19 million households. Unless Congress takes action, one in four families with children - up from one in 22 last year - will owe up to $3,640 in additional federal income tax next April. Few of them realize that their taxes have increased, because Congress has not voted to raise taxes. Instead, Congress let a tax break expire.
NEWS
May 9, 2014
"If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. " That little nugget of truth, also known as the "law of the instrument," can be applied to more than just tool selection. When it comes to some closely-held beliefs, people tend to see circumstances as frequently proving them correct - even when they do nothing of the kind. At least that might explain why a recently-released Gallup poll finding that 47 percent of Maryland residents would choose to move if they could - the third highest percentage among the states - is being cited by many as evidence of failed tax policy.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
It has been reported that House Speaker John Boehner is backing a compromise on taxing those "rich" Americans who make over $1 million a year. Unfortunately, that threshold, as well as President Barack Obama's proposal to increase taxes on those making over $250,000 at the Clinton era tax rate, is not going to solve the long term deficit problem, especially while spending remains out of control as it has been during Mr. Obama's presidency....
NEWS
November 21, 2012
In addressing the so-called "fiscal cliff" of tax increases and deep spending cuts, President Obama needs to hold firm in letting the tax breaks for the wealthy expire ("Obama talks tough," Nov. 15). This is a matter of fairness on tax policy that he stressed during the campaign. Exit polling showed that 60 percent of the electorate support higher taxes for the wealthy. That's where Congress should start in working out a balanced approach to keeping the country from going off the "fiscal cliff.
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