Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTax On Gasoline
IN THE NEWS

Tax On Gasoline

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | January 22, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer says he is not wedded to a 5 percent sales tax on gasoline as a way of restocking the nearly depleted state transportation construction fund."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2013
The governor of Virginia has thrown a new wrinkle into a Maryland debate by calling for abolition of the commonwealth's gas tax and increasing the sales tax to pay for roads and transit - a move that would alter the competitive balance between the two states. This week's proposal by Gov. Bob McDonnell, a Republican, is part of a five-year $3.1 billion plan that seeks to address that state's lack of money for transportation projects - which parallels a similar shortfall in Maryland - by shifting from a dwindling revenue source to one with the potential to grow with inflation.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | January 20, 1991
The soundproofing of two county elementary schools within the flightpaths of Baltimore-Washington International Airport will have to wait until state officials solve the fiscal crunch facing the Departmentof Transportation.Gov. William Donald Schaefer imposed a temporary freeze on new construction spending by the Department of Transportation in November. DOT officials had earlier reported that the Transportation Trust Fund used to pay for school soundproofing as well as light rail and road projects had been depleted.
NEWS
January 31, 2012
When Gov. Martin O'Malley gives his annual State of the State address Wednesday, he will officially unveil his plan to apply a 6 percent sales tax to gasoline. The public's mood about gas prices being what it is, the governor probably shouldn't expect huge applause — despite the fact he deserves it. Maryland hasn't raised the gasoline tax since William Donald Schaefer was governor two decades ago, and the current rate — applied as a 23.5-cent charge per gallon — has been rendered insufficient by inflation.
NEWS
January 21, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer on Friday asked the General Assembly to approve a 5 percent tax on gasoline to be added to the existing state tax of 18 1/2 cents per gallon. In addition, he asked the legislature to approve a state takeover of the cost of operating Baltimore's jail and zoo in his annual State of the State address. Schaefer said the city cannot afford to pay for the jail and zoo. He wants the gas tax to pay for new transportation projects.How do you feel about the proposals: Do you support a higher gasoline tax, or not?
NEWS
By Doug Birch | January 5, 1991
Department of Transportation officials plan to recommend Monday that the state impose a new 5 percent sales tax on motor fuel along with increases in motor vehicle and truck fees, state government sources confirmed yesterday.If it were imposed today, the sales tax would add almost 7 cents to the average cost of a gallon of gasoline in Maryland, sending the price from $1.33 to almost $1.40.The proposed new tax would be in addition to the state's 18.5-cents-per-gallon flat tax on gasoline and other motor fuels.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 22, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that he does not care whether the state raises the tax on gasoline by a percentage or by a flat increase per gallon, just as long as the needed money is raised."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | February 1, 1991
They're from different political parties, but Gov. William Donald Schaefer and President Bush now have at least one thing in common: Both broke pledges not to seek new taxes.Where Bush said, "Read my lips, no new taxes," Schaefer put it more simply: "I'm not going to seek new taxes."Schaefer's no-new-taxes comments, now contradicted by his administration's efforts to levy a sales tax on gasoline and to raise about $800 million in other revenues, were made to reporters during an informal "brown bag" breakfast meeting in Annapolis on Dec. 21.Asked at the meeting if he planned to go to taxpayers for more money, Schaefer said without hesitation: "I am not advocating any taxes."
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
Maryland will likely have to boost its tax on gasoline soon to keep the state's transportation system in good shape, the General Assembly's presiding officers said yesterday.But bowing to political concerns, the lawmakers said any increase in the state's 23.5-cents-per-gallon tax on gasoline will have to wait until the legislature convenes after the 1998 elections."The money for these projects doesn't come out of the sky," Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said during an Ocean City forum sponsored by the Maryland Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
December 8, 2005
Ronald Reagan did it in his first term. George H. W. Bush approved of one, too. So did Bill Clinton. They all raised the federal tax on gasoline and diesel fuel. The tax goes into a trust fund that finances highway and transit projects across the country. It's a fair and efficient kind of user fee: The more people drive, the more they pay for repairs and congestion relief. And drivers don't seem to mind. Last month, Washington state voters declined to rollback a whopping 9.5-cent gas tax. Despite all this, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is predicting the federal government will run short of funds for public transportation and roads in three years.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Michael Dresser and Jennifer Skalka and Michael Dresser,Sun reporters | August 22, 2007
The last time Maryland's gasoline tax was raised, the first President Bush was in office, Gov. William Donald Schaefer was near the height of his political power and the price of a gallon of regular was a little more than $1. Now Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration is faced with swelling infrastructure costs and a state Transportation Trust Fund in urgent need of a cash infusion. Leading lawmakers say they expect O'Malley to propose an increase in Maryland's 23.5 cents-a-gallon tax and possibly recommend other measures, such as a sales tax on gasoline and tying future increases to inflation or construction costs.
NEWS
December 8, 2005
Ronald Reagan did it in his first term. George H. W. Bush approved of one, too. So did Bill Clinton. They all raised the federal tax on gasoline and diesel fuel. The tax goes into a trust fund that finances highway and transit projects across the country. It's a fair and efficient kind of user fee: The more people drive, the more they pay for repairs and congestion relief. And drivers don't seem to mind. Last month, Washington state voters declined to rollback a whopping 9.5-cent gas tax. Despite all this, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is predicting the federal government will run short of funds for public transportation and roads in three years.
NEWS
November 22, 1998
Flat foolish editorial on revenue fundsRegarding your editorial "Annapolis' flat-earth council" (Nov. 13) I appreciate that you got two things right.First, you spelled my name right, and I am very grateful. Second, I have to agree wholeheartedly with your point that Baltimore has a revenue authority.In all my "illogical" rhetoric on the subject as president of the Ward One Residents Association, I consistently used the stadium revenue authority aptly described last year by a Democratic state senator from Montgomery County as "this huge vacuum cleaner, sucking up all public funds in sight, beyond even the huge amounts provided last year" as the paramount example of just the kind of "forward-thinking" what we in Annapolis were afraid of.TTC I was a teen-ager in Baltimore in the 1960s, and I knew some of The Sun editorial greats in those days, mostly by the privilege of dating a couple of their daughters, whose identities I'd better protect lest they be tainted with flat-earth associations by their local newspaper.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
Maryland will likely have to boost its tax on gasoline soon to keep the state's transportation system in good shape, the General Assembly's presiding officers said yesterday.But bowing to political concerns, the lawmakers said any increase in the state's 23.5-cents-per-gallon tax on gasoline will have to wait until the legislature convenes after the 1998 elections."The money for these projects doesn't come out of the sky," Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said during an Ocean City forum sponsored by the Maryland Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Larry Carson, Consella A. Lee and Craig Timberg contributed to this article | January 17, 1997
An ebullient Gov. Parris N. Glendening ladled out more than $300 million for transportation projects yesterday, including a long-sought Salisbury bypass designed to speed travel to and from Ocean City.For the third straight year, the governor resisted calls to increase the state's gasoline tax to shore up the Transportation Trust Fund, through which such projects are financed."Because of good fiscal management, we do not need that increase," Glendening said.The largest outlay in the six-year transportation proposal was $26.9 million for a U.S. 50 bypass to let drivers reach Ocean City without having to pass through the traffic lights of downtown Salisbury -- one of the largest bottlenecks on the road to the beach resort.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
The Arts World Contributes to the TreasuryI would like to know if Congress has ever taken a study to determine how much money is paid into the Treasury as a direct and indirect result of the "arts" institutions in America.It seems that the Republicans are quick to assume that the arts are costing the federal government too much money, I believe around $167 million.We know that amounts to less than a dollar per taxpayer and is equal to about .003 percent of the budget. We know that's five times less than one Stealth bomber and about the same as a new tank.
NEWS
November 22, 1998
Flat foolish editorial on revenue fundsRegarding your editorial "Annapolis' flat-earth council" (Nov. 13) I appreciate that you got two things right.First, you spelled my name right, and I am very grateful. Second, I have to agree wholeheartedly with your point that Baltimore has a revenue authority.In all my "illogical" rhetoric on the subject as president of the Ward One Residents Association, I consistently used the stadium revenue authority aptly described last year by a Democratic state senator from Montgomery County as "this huge vacuum cleaner, sucking up all public funds in sight, beyond even the huge amounts provided last year" as the paramount example of just the kind of "forward-thinking" what we in Annapolis were afraid of.TTC I was a teen-ager in Baltimore in the 1960s, and I knew some of The Sun editorial greats in those days, mostly by the privilege of dating a couple of their daughters, whose identities I'd better protect lest they be tainted with flat-earth associations by their local newspaper.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Bush administration officials proposed a broad-based tax on petroleum yesterday, as White House and congressional negotiators renewed their drive to cut a deficit-denting budget deal.The administration's proposal came in response to a Democratic offer Tuesday that would effectively increase the tax on gasoline by 13 cents a gallon and slap a 4 percent sales tax on other fuels.It was the first time the White House has endorsed an energy tax, a potentially significant breakthrough in the marathon budget talks.
NEWS
December 23, 1992
Gas tax: unpalatable but necessaryIn concept, balancing the budget and reducing the deficit are not difficult. Expenses need to be decreased and revenues need to be increased in a combined amount that brings them into balance, even after new investments are added.The difficulty is political; having a wildly diverse democracy, based on checks and balances and local self-interests, to accept the discipline of shared sacrifice is not an easy task.Cutting defense, entitlements, health-care costs, government waste, agriculture subsidies, interest on the national debt and dozens of other areas won't, by themselves, produce the $600 billion needed.
NEWS
By PETER JAY | February 23, 1992
Havre de Grace -- Believe it or not, the Annapolis tax train may have gone off the rails.Six weeks ago, hardly anyone anticipated that. When this year's session of the Maryland General Assembly convened in January, it was generally assumed that Gov. William Donald Schaefer would get a huge tax increase of some sort in spite of the ham-handed way in which he went after it.That this would be right and proper, as well as inevitable, was a view espoused by...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.