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Tax On Boats

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NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
Boat dealers in Maryland and across the nation are hoping that Congress will soon throw them a lifeline by repealing a luxury tax on yachts that has crippled an industry already wracked by the recession.The House is expected to vote this week on a deficit-reduction bill that includes the repeal of the 10 percent luxury tax on boats costing more than $100,000, which together with the recession cost the boating industry billions of dollars in lost sales and tens of thousands of jobs.There is strong support in both the House and Senate, and among both parties, to end the tax. Capitol Hill staffers expect the tax to be eliminated -- retroactive to Jan. 1, 1993 -- before Congress leaves for its August recess.
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NEWS
September 4, 2012
One of the great summer pleasures that comes with living in Maryland is the opportunity to get on a boat and paddle, motor or sail your way around the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries. Few places in the U.S. are better suited for boating, and the state's geographic blessing has produced economic rewards for its citizens - an estimated 35,000 jobs produced by a $2 billion industry. But these are not the best of times for those in the boating industry. The economic recession of 2007 hit hard, and the recovery has been slow.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- First of all, Richard Dein wants to set the record straight. Boating is not yacht clubs, 42-foot sailboats and cabin cruisers. It's not fat cats and deep pockets. It's a 20-foot power boat, a fishing pole, a beer or two and a Sunday afternoon on the South River.But that garden-variety American dream is getting tougher and tougher for the little guy to afford, says Mr. Dein.Take beer, for instance. The price went up last week with the new federal excise tax. Gas has jumped to $1.30 a gallon, thanks to federal taxes and Iraqis.
NEWS
October 15, 2001
Maryland is right to enforce the tax on boats using bay I applaud the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' efforts to apprehend those who cheat on the "usage tax" for the purchase and permanent use of boats in Maryland ("State intensifies collection effort for boat-use tax," Sept. 30). I think it is ludicrous to suggest, as boat owner Chris Washburn did in the article, that if the tax is vigorously enforced, "Maryland would become a dangerous place to cruise." Mr. Washburn misses the point of the tax. It has nothing to do with cruising; it is directed at owners who use the bay almost exclusively and never pay the tax, thereby failing to contribute to its upkeep.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
In a move designed to boost the state's maritime industry, the Maryland House of Delegates voted yesterday to give boat buyers a tax break when they trade in old boats for more expensive models.Supporters said the measure would make Maryland more competitive with other states in the region and would help the industry recover from a sales slump."It's the best news we've had in at least 20 years," said Beth Kahr, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland. "We've finally got a chance to gain parity with our competitors in other states.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
For most people, the 45-foot Bayliner with the airy salon, fully stocked galley with microwave and master stateroom with its own stereo system, tub and shower on display near City Dock in Annapolis yesterday is just a fantasy.But the yacht, one of hundreds tied up for the 21st annual U.S. Powerboat Show, had fulfilled someone's dream. Next to its $315,495 price tag was a large "Sold" sign.And by the end of the day yesterday Tidewater Yacht Sales Inc. had sold another.John R. Atherton, president of Tidewater, a Portsmouth, Va., dealer of Bayliner and boats priced from $120,000 to $320,000, wasn't surprised, despite the lingering recession.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | October 7, 1993
The United States Sailboat Show opens in Annapolis tomorrow with boat dealers buoyed by an upswing in sales that they say stems from the repeal of the federal luxury tax on boats."
NEWS
By Nancy Noyes | December 5, 1990
Many of us don't think too often about the health and well-being of the national and local marine industry that makes it possible for us to enjoy our time in boats.Over the past few weeks, however, it has become very clear that not only the marine industry but also boating consumers -- boat owners, especially -- are being singled out systematically to bear an increasing burden.By now, the new federal excise tax of 10 percent of the amount over $100,000 for boat purchases, and the graduated annual Coast Guard user fee ranging from $25 to $100 based on boat size are old news to most of us.Now, however, the state of Maryland is proposing to hit us again, both directly and indirectly.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | July 26, 1991
Fourteen years ago, Mick Blackistone and other boating enthusiasts set out to stop an avalanche of new regulations and taxes they feared would bury marine businesses.Rounding up support from boat dealers, sailmakers and marina operators, they revived the dormant Marine Trades Association of Maryland. Since then, the Annapolis-based group has increased its budget from $2,000 to about $150,000, peaked at 500members in the mid-1980s, pushed through 13 new laws to protect the industry and worked to stop others deemed harmful to boating business.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | October 23, 1991
A steady downpour pelted the U.S. Powerboat Show as it opened Thursday, but people lined up anyway. To Fred Quimby, the people out on thegray, blustery day were a pretty sight."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
In a move designed to boost the state's maritime industry, the Maryland House of Delegates voted yesterday to give boat buyers a tax break when they trade in old boats for more expensive models.Supporters said the measure would make Maryland more competitive with other states in the region and would help the industry recover from a sales slump."It's the best news we've had in at least 20 years," said Beth Kahr, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland. "We've finally got a chance to gain parity with our competitors in other states.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
In a move designed to boost the state's maritime industry, the Maryland House of Delegates voted yesterday to give boat buyers a tax break when they trade in old boats for more expensive models.Supporters said the measure would make Maryland more competitive with other states in the region and would help the industry recover from a sales slump."It's the best news we've had in at least 20 years," said Beth Kahr, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland. "We've finally got a chance to gain parity with our competitors in other states.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | October 7, 1993
The United States Sailboat Show opens in Annapolis tomorrow with boat dealers buoyed by an upswing in sales that they say stems from the repeal of the federal luxury tax on boats."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | August 2, 1993
After a five-month investigation, Natural Resources Police arrested a 39-year-old Queen Anne's County man yesterday, charging that he pocketed $11,400 in state excise taxes he collected on the sale of seven pleasure boats, an agency spokesman said.Louis P. Alcamo, 39, of the 300 block of Wye Harbor Drive, Queenstown, was arrested at his home about 8:30 a.m. and charged with five counts of fraud, five counts of felony theft, two counts of misdemeanor theft and seven counts of failure to pay excise taxes, said DNR spokesman John S. Verrico.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | May 25, 1993
Boat dealers in Maryland and across the nation are hoping that Congress will soon throw them a lifeline by repealing a luxury tax on yachts that has crippled an industry already wracked by the recession.The House is expected to vote this week on a deficit-reduction bill that includes the repeal of the 10 percent luxury tax on boats costing more than $100,000, which together with the recession cost the boating industry billions of dollars in lost sales and tens of thousands of jobs.There is strong support in both the House and Senate, and among both parties, to end the tax. Capitol Hill staffers expect the tax to be eliminated -- retroactive to Jan. 1, 1993 -- before Congress leaves for its August recess.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | November 12, 1992
FISHING HOLESWith the rockfish season ending this weekend for charter boats in Maryland and the recreational season already closed, the best bets for fishing might well be the Wicomico, Chester and Choptank rivers on the Eastern Shore and the upper and lower Potomac River.Ken Penrod of Outdoor Life Unlimited, a fishing and hunting guide service, reports that the upper Potomac is very low and clear and the fishing there has been getting tougher. Best bets are to try the deeper pools and rock ledges with ribbed worms worked very slowly and deep.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | October 5, 1990
For many boat dealers, the United States Sailboat Show opening today in Annapolis will be a bittersweet affair.Looming over the City Dock and harbor, where dealers have gathered for 20 years to sail their stuff and woo potential buyers, is the fear of what a 10 percent tax on boats and yachts costing dTC more than $100,000 would do to an already wayward marine industry.On Sunday, the 10 percent tax on so-called luxury items was included in a five-year budget plan aimed at easing the federal deficit.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
In a move designed to boost the state's maritime industry, the Maryland House of Delegates voted yesterday to give boat buyers a tax break when they trade in old boats for more expensive models.Supporters said the measure would make Maryland more competitive with other states in the region and would help the industry recover from a sales slump."It's the best news we've had in at least 20 years," said Beth Kahr, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland. "We've finally got a chance to gain parity with our competitors in other states.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
For most people, the 45-foot Bayliner with the airy salon, fully stocked galley with microwave and master stateroom with its own stereo system, tub and shower on display near City Dock in Annapolis yesterday is just a fantasy.But the yacht, one of hundreds tied up for the 21st annual U.S. Powerboat Show, had fulfilled someone's dream. Next to its $315,495 price tag was a large "Sold" sign.And by the end of the day yesterday Tidewater Yacht Sales Inc. had sold another.John R. Atherton, president of Tidewater, a Portsmouth, Va., dealer of Bayliner and boats priced from $120,000 to $320,000, wasn't surprised, despite the lingering recession.
NEWS
By Robert Pear and Robert Pear,New York Times News Service | January 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Sprinkling largess among diverse constituencies at the start of an election year, President Bush wants to repeal the luxury tax on yachts and will propose a substantial increase in the federal budget for feeding and vaccinating poor children.Confidential galley proofs of the budget, to be sent to Congress on Wednesday, show that Mr. Bush will also propose a doubling of federal spending to control tuberculosis, as well as a public housing initiative to let tenants oust bad managers.
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