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NEWS
October 22, 1992
In keeping with the political fun and games always played with tax legislation, Democrats are in the process of deciding whether to embarrass President Bush by forcing him to pocket-veto a Christmas-tree bill passed on the last day of Congress or to delay in hopes he will sign it just after election day. We favor a veto.No tears need be shed for Mr. Bush because he is in this trap. It is very much of his own making. The voluminous measure, passed in the House in the wee hours as it rushed to adjournment, contains several measures the Republican incumbent advocated, including tax concessions to those who invest in 50 low-income enterprise zones and tax breaks for certain industries and special groups that could give the economy a boost.
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NEWS
May 22, 2012
I and other retired veterans residing in Maryland will soon be seeking another state in which to live due to the disproportionate impact of the state's new tax legislation on retired veterans. Having served my country for more than 25 years, I find that the People's Republic of Maryland views me as wealthy merely because I have gainful post-retirement employment in addition to my previously-earned retirement income. I moved 16 times in my military career, so I'm well versed in voting with my feet.
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BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | September 24, 1990
Many people grumble that federal tax laws often seem unnecessarily convoluted and, at times, arbitrary.Baltimore attorney Richard E. Levine agrees. But Mr. Levine, who heads Miles & Stockbridge's taxation department, differs from most people in that he's in a position to help redefine the way tax laws are created.He was recently appointed chairman of the American Bar Association's 250-member partnership committee on taxation. In his capacity as chairman, Mr. Levine and his vice chairman frequently travel to Capitol Hill to work with the people creating tax legislation and regulations.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
I am writing to you as a supporter of Bobby Zirkin and to dispute the Dan Rodricks ' column "Maybe Bobby Zirkin should be a Republican" (March 20). I disagree for numerous reasons. The discrepancies begin with the subtitle, which mentions the "millionaire's tax. " When does an income above $500,000 make someone a millionaire? I feel that this subtitle was a ploy to intrigue interest in the article, even though that statement is obviously false. Yet, this is the least of my issues.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
This is the time when taxpayers start thinking about strategies to reduce next year's tax bill. But such planning is exceptionally tricky this year. Many tax cuts created in 2001 and 2003 are set to expire after Dec. 31, from historically low income tax rates to the temporary repeal of the federal estate tax. Legislators talk about extending tax breaks but can't agree on who should get them. President Barack Obama and many Democrats want to maintain tax cuts for all but the wealthiest.
NEWS
May 22, 2012
I and other retired veterans residing in Maryland will soon be seeking another state in which to live due to the disproportionate impact of the state's new tax legislation on retired veterans. Having served my country for more than 25 years, I find that the People's Republic of Maryland views me as wealthy merely because I have gainful post-retirement employment in addition to my previously-earned retirement income. I moved 16 times in my military career, so I'm well versed in voting with my feet.
NEWS
May 15, 2000
SOME U.S. insurance companies have created their own Bermuda triangle. Instead of ships and planes vanishing without a trace, these companies have figured out how to make their federal tax burden disappear. American property and casualty companies that insure businesses make their profits not on premiums charged but by investing their reserves. A handful of them have figured out that by reconstituting and headquartering their corporate parents in Bermuda, , their investment earnings can escape nearly all U.S. taxation.
NEWS
June 15, 1995
FROM the Great Debate:Q. I would like to ask a question for both of you to answer -- do you really think that $4.50 is too much to make per hour? The minimum wage I'm talking.President Clinton: I'm for raising it. [Applause. Cheers.]Speaker Gingrich: I think that -- let me say that I think that I'd like to see every American make as much as they can possibly make. But I also am concerned -- I also -- no, I don't think it's too much. I am very concerned, however -- there is a disagreement among economists about this -- I am very concerned that if you raise the cost of the first job for the poorest person, for example in the inner city, that what you tend to do is increase black male teen-age unemployment, which is exactly the thing you don't want to do. My goal is to have a rapidly growing economy where, frankly, wages keep going up, because people are better educated, more productive, and can compete in the world market.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In the tax legislation he submitted early this month, Rep. Bill Archer, the chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, proposed raising more than $4 billion in the next decade by trimming and eventually abolishing the federal tax subsidy for ethanol.Archer, a Texas Republican, even managed to win his committee's approval of the measure. But then it ran into snags.House Speaker Newt Gingrich spread the word that he would use his authority to have the changes in the tax treatment ofethanol deleted or at least significantly modified before the tax bill went before the full House of Representatives.
EXPLORE
January 12, 2012
Editor: Thank you for the support you have shown me as your State Delegate.  After one year and many tough decisions, the hardest yet is the hotel tax legislation, which I've been opposed. Many Republicans now support it: County Executive David Craig, Senator Nancy Jacobs, Delegate Rick Impalaria, Mayor Dougherty. Because my first thought is for my constituents, I've been researching this issue tirelessly. Here are some points:     • It's not a tax on Harford County citizens or hotels.    • Businesses and hotel owners want it.    • Harford County is the only county without one.    • At least 75 percent would go toward local tourism.  • Harford County citizens are for it.     • Harford County citizens pay a lot in hotel fees in other counties/states.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater | March 19, 2012
Banking on future income from slots, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to formally introduce legislation at Monday's City Council hearing that would reduce Baltimore's property tax rate by 20 cents for homeowners by 2020. The plan rewards owner-occupied properties through a homeowner's tax credit program funded with projected revenue from future slots machines to be installed in Baltimore. In a news release about the proposal, the city characterized it as "responsible. " Property taxes were a hot issue during last year's mayoral campaign, when several challengers proposed alternative tax reduction plans.
EXPLORE
January 12, 2012
Editor: Thank you for the support you have shown me as your State Delegate.  After one year and many tough decisions, the hardest yet is the hotel tax legislation, which I've been opposed. Many Republicans now support it: County Executive David Craig, Senator Nancy Jacobs, Delegate Rick Impalaria, Mayor Dougherty. Because my first thought is for my constituents, I've been researching this issue tirelessly. Here are some points:     • It's not a tax on Harford County citizens or hotels.    • Businesses and hotel owners want it.    • Harford County is the only county without one.    • At least 75 percent would go toward local tourism.  • Harford County citizens are for it.     • Harford County citizens pay a lot in hotel fees in other counties/states.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley signed the first tax increase on alcohol in more than a generation into law Thursday, one of more than 200 bills he approved at a ceremony in Annapolis. Come July 1, the sales tax on alcohol will rise to 9 percent from 6 percent, a move that legislative analysts say will generate about $85 million per year. Much of the initial revenue is earmarked for education in Baltimore and Prince George's County, school construction across the state and services for Marylanders with developmental disabilities.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2010
This is the time when taxpayers start thinking about strategies to reduce next year's tax bill. But such planning is exceptionally tricky this year. Many tax cuts created in 2001 and 2003 are set to expire after Dec. 31, from historically low income tax rates to the temporary repeal of the federal estate tax. Legislators talk about extending tax breaks but can't agree on who should get them. President Barack Obama and many Democrats want to maintain tax cuts for all but the wealthiest.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | January 20, 2008
Get ready for another tricky tax season. Some last-minute tax legislation by Congress has once more turned something predictable and tedious into something that's confusing and, well, tedious. This time, it waited so long to pass legislation to stop the spread of the alternative minimum tax that the IRS hasn't fully updated its systems yet. Millions of taxpayers who file certain forms must wait until Feb. 11 to get their returns processed. That's sure to delay some refunds. On the upside, Congress created new tax breaks for homeowners.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | December 22, 2006
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman is moving to change a seemingly contradictory policy under which people with limited incomes often own a partial share of their subsidized homes but must pay property taxes on the full market value. Ulman, who said during his election campaign that he would like to reduce that burden, asked the local General Assembly delegation this week to help him deliver on that pledge by passing a tax-relief bill. The property tax legislation is one of a package of local bills Ulman is asking county legislators to support in next month's Assembly session.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- "Middle-class America needs a tax cut," says Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, D-Md.But the "Middle Income Tax Cut Bill" that she's co-sponsoring isn't just for the middle class."
NEWS
March 25, 2012
I am writing to you as a supporter of Bobby Zirkin and to dispute the Dan Rodricks ' column "Maybe Bobby Zirkin should be a Republican" (March 20). I disagree for numerous reasons. The discrepancies begin with the subtitle, which mentions the "millionaire's tax. " When does an income above $500,000 make someone a millionaire? I feel that this subtitle was a ploy to intrigue interest in the article, even though that statement is obviously false. Yet, this is the least of my issues.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and David Nitkin and Michael Dresser and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Stung by the House of Delegates' rejection of his slot machines bill, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. threatened yesterday to veto the revenue bills legislative leaders are putting together to balance the state budget. Declaring that he is "frustrated" but not angry over Wednesday's committee vote against the centerpiece of his legislative agenda, Ehrlich drew a stark line against tax increases now or in the future. Ehrlich said that with his slots bill defeated, his administration would turn to "Plan B" -- drastic spending cuts.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2003
Two state senators from Harford County have introduced legislation that would allow the County Council to consider special taxing districts in areas where development is straining infrastructure. The bill, introduced at the request of County Executive James M. Harkins, would allow for special taxing districts - at the request of property owners - to collect fees that would pay for a broad range of services, from schools to water and sewer. Sens. Nancy Jacobs and J. Robert Hooper, both Republicans, introduced the bill last week to meet Friday's Senate filing deadline for legislation.
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