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NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | September 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Republicans are losing their long-held grip on the often powerful issue of taxes, making it that much harder for President Bush to catch Bill Clinton.Mr. Bush appears not to be swaying many voters by pledging to cut taxes and by attacking Mr. Clinton as a proponent of higher taxes -- tactics that have helped Republicans win five of the past six presidential elections.Polls, including a USA Today/CNN/Gallup survey released yesterday, reveal a stunning change in public attitude toward a Democratic presidential candidate: More voters believe Mr. Clinton would handle taxes better than Mr. Bush, who lost credibility on the issue with many voters by breaking his 1988 vow not to raise taxes.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | December 4, 2012
Ayatollahs seem to just appoint themselves and then start enforcing their own brand of orthodoxy. Grover Norquist has been doing that in the Republican Party for years. Mr. Norquist has never been elected to anything. Nobody ever said he should be in charge of the GOP's true religion (although he claims President Ronald Reagan urged him to found his lobbying group, Americans for Tax Reform). But he certainly has been the Republicans' key political theologian who made opposition to tax increases the party's central tenet for more than 25 years.
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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | April 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- One of the burdens Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole carries into his third bid for the Republican presidential nomination, at least among political insiders, is a reputation for poor political decisions. But an early indication that he is learning from past mistakes is his signing of a pledge not to raise income taxes if he is elected president.Without the slightest fanfare, Dole signed the document, distributed to all candidates by an anti-tax group called Americans for Tax Reform, in his Senate office last week.
NEWS
June 3, 2012
This Wednesday's planned opening of the half-billion-dollar Maryland Live! Casino at Arundel Mills marks a red-letter day in Maryland gaming history. The scale of the enormous, 330,000-square-foot facility is stunning: It will eventually house 4,750 slot machines (far more than any other Maryland facility) in addition to restaurants and entertainment. No doubt the opening will be a particularly satisfying moment for developer David Cordish and others at the Cordish Cos.who overcame a considerable number of obstacles, not least a 2010 voter referendum.
NEWS
January 17, 1992
"I solemnly swear that if I am president of the United States I will never raise the taxes of the American people." So says the New Hampshire pledge that Pat Buchanan signed. He has called on President Bush to do the same. That is an issue that is at least one election late. Sen. Bob Dole refused to sign such a pledge in New Hampshire in 1988, and lost the primary to George Bush. Many blamed the tax issue at the time, but LTC pollsters on the scene said other factors were more important.This year, all the candidates are talking about cutting taxes, not raising them.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | September 17, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- That nasty T-word -- taxes -- popped up yesterday, and General Assembly leaders immediately batted it back down.A coalition of 130 organizations representing teachers, unions, senior citizens, the poor and others suggested that the governor and legislature should at least consider raising taxes again to offset a new half-billion-dollar budget shortfall and save programs that otherwise may be cut.The coalition, which for the past year has acted...
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Laura Lippman and John W. Frece and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | April 3, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- If ordinary motorists wind up paying 6 cents a gallon more for gasoline over the next eight months while truckers don't, they can look to a back-room deal brokered by a politically connected Baltimore baker and truck stop owner.In the hallway behind the state Senate chamber, beyond the sign that bars ordinary lobbyists, John Paterakis presented himself earlier this week to complain about a bill that would raise the state's tax on diesel fuel.With the aid of a friendly senator and some leverage on an unrelated bill that transportation officials desperately want, Mr. Paterakis appears close to getting what he wants: a delay in the full tax increase on the fuel that truckers buy.The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee yesterday passed a bill that would increase Maryland's tax on gasoline by 6 cents a gallon, to 24.5 cents, starting May 1. The House earlier passed a nickel-a-gallon increase.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Karen Hosler and John Fairhall and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton was right about everything except the timing when he warned Monday that special interests would begin attacking his economic program "within minutes" of the conclusion of his speech to Congress tonight.In fact, the attack has already begun, from coal companies and presumably from other industries concerned about an expected broad-based energy tax.On Capitol Hill, three representatives of ARCO, a major oil and chemical company, met in secret yesterday with six aides to members of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, and discussed the tax issue over turkey sandwiches.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 17, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Some Republicans with very long memories are reminding their junior colleagues these days to remember 1964 before growing too complacent about the future.That was the year Lyndon B. Johnson buried Barry Goldwater in a landslide that left the Republicans as demoralized as the Democratic Party is today. The Republicans then, like the Democrats today, were seeking scapegoats and assessing blame.But only four years later, Republicans rose from the ashes as Richard M. Nixon defeated Democrat Hubert H. Humphrey.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 4, 1990
CHICAGO -- Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Hartigan, who has been doing a fair imitation of Ronald Reagan and George Bush in their no-new-taxes campaign promises of 1984 and 1988, has decided to put just about all his eggs in that basket.Trailing Republican Jim Edgar, the Illinois secretary of state, going into the summer, Hartigan first unleashed a series of television ads that single-mindedly hammered at Edgar as a politician who would tax Illinoisans as a first resort to meet the state's educational problems.
NEWS
April 10, 2012
It wouldn't be right to call the calamitous end of the General Assembly session a failure. The word "failure" implies that those involved were trying to do the right thing and were for some reason unsuccessful. What happened Monday night, as the politics of an ill-considered gambling expansion bill tangled up a sensible compromise on taxes and the budget, was something quite different, a mixture of sabotage, negligence and too-cute-by-half gamesmanship. It reflects poorly on Maryland's leaders and belies the seriousness of the one real matter at hand: Who should be asked to pay more to maintain crucial state services, and how much?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 5, 2012
Negotiators for the Maryland Senate and House remain at an impasse over the state budget with only four full days remaining before the scheduled end of the General Assembly's 90-day session, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said Thursday. "We remain still at loggerheads between the House and Senate conferees," said Miller, a  Calvert County Democrat. He said Gov. Martin O'Malley is attempting to act as mediator between the two sides. The conference committees on the three unresolved bills that make up the budget package have met only sporadically since the negotiations began Monday, when talks stalled on the key measure raising income taxes.  Until that matter is resolved, budget negotiators won't know how much money is available to spend.
EXPLORE
January 18, 2012
It seems in Maryland politics, there are occasional issues that linger beyond their usefulness. Back when I was a kid, well into my teens and possibly even later than that, Maryland was the only state that didn't require dump trucks to cover their loads. It's a basic safety issue. When a truck hauling loose materials like gravel, or sand or salt or whatever is cruising along a roadway at 35 to 55 mph, there's a possibility of spillage. This can be substantially reduced by covering a dump truck full of whatever with a heavy tarp.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
(Dec. 21) Maryland Democrats continued to ramp up pressure on House GOP leaders Wednesday over a stalled effort to extend a payroll tax cut that benefits as many as 2.6 million wage earners in the state. With days left before the 2 percentage point payroll tax cut expires, Washington is once more languishing in impasse. House Republicans want to continue negotiations on a one-year extension of the cut. Democrats are calling on House GOP leaders to vote on a two-month extension the Senate passed over the weekend -- a bill all but seven Senate Republicans supported.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | eileen.ambrose@baltsun.com | March 28, 2010
J oin the Army, see the world - and a complicated tax return. Maj. Troy Chinevere has been stationed in Texas, Massachusetts and Alabama. He has been transferred for work every three or four years, like the many service members at Fort Meade, Aberdeen Proving Ground and other military bases in Maryland. And such frequent moves can create tricky tax situations. This year, Chinevere wonders whether there is any leniency for the military under the longtime resident homebuyer credit, worth up to $6,500.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 16, 2010
Speaking Tuesday morning to the Pikesville Chamber of Commerce, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. outlined policies -- many of them involving taxes -- that he said have made the state's business climate inhospitable to employers. " Maryland is a great state, but it sure makes it difficult to make a buck," he said. The state's only Republican governor in the past four decades said small business owners should make an effort to unseat legislators who have voted for such policies, but he dodged questions about his own potential candidacy.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
(Dec. 21) Maryland Democrats continued to ramp up pressure on House GOP leaders Wednesday over a stalled effort to extend a payroll tax cut that benefits as many as 2.6 million wage earners in the state. With days left before the 2 percentage point payroll tax cut expires, Washington is once more languishing in impasse. House Republicans want to continue negotiations on a one-year extension of the cut. Democrats are calling on House GOP leaders to vote on a two-month extension the Senate passed over the weekend -- a bill all but seven Senate Republicans supported.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | April 5, 2012
Negotiators for the Maryland Senate and House remain at an impasse over the state budget with only four full days remaining before the scheduled end of the General Assembly's 90-day session, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said Thursday. "We remain still at loggerheads between the House and Senate conferees," said Miller, a  Calvert County Democrat. He said Gov. Martin O'Malley is attempting to act as mediator between the two sides. The conference committees on the three unresolved bills that make up the budget package have met only sporadically since the negotiations began Monday, when talks stalled on the key measure raising income taxes.  Until that matter is resolved, budget negotiators won't know how much money is available to spend.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | June 15, 2008
Retirement savers have been plowing money into foreign stocks, but experts say many are failing to consider taxes and how the investments fit within their overall plan. Foreign stock mutual funds accounted for $722 billion in workplace retirement accounts, including 401(k) plans, and in individual retirement accounts last year, says the Investment Company Institute, a mutual fund trade group, a more than 80 percent increase in just two years. As investors pile on, however, many fail to realize their foreign dividends are subject to tax, even though their money is sitting in tax-deferred retirement accounts.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | February 21, 2008
State and local officials urged lawmakers yesterday to enact legislation that they say will make sure private developments on Maryland military bases pay their fair share for the new roads, water and sewer lines needed to accommodate an influx of military jobs into the state. Backers of Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to allow local governments to negotiate payments in lieu of taxes for the projects say that is the only equitable way to deal with the off-base impacts of such developments.
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