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NEWS
March 26, 2013
It was only a matter of time before Gov. Martin O' Malley and his groupies pushed another tax burden upon us ("House approves increase in gas tax," March 23). House Majority leader Kumar Barve estimates that this increase will cost motorists $10.10 a month, based on the example of someone who drives 15,000 miles a year in a car that gets 25 miles to the gallon. That may be the case in his world, but unfortunately not mine. My small business requires a truck that at best gets 13.5 miles to the gallon and an annual mileage exceeding 50,000 miles a year.
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NEWS
May 28, 2014
We at the Maryland Health Care For All Coalition, representing hundreds of faith, community, labor, business and health care groups from across Maryland, hope that when Attorney General Doug Gansler and the Republican candidates for governor criticize the "40 new taxes" enacted under the O'Malley administration they are not including in their criticism the life saving tobacco and alcohol tax increases approved in 2007, 2011 and 2012. The one-dollar per pack cigarette tax increase enacted in 2007, which Attorney General Gansler supported, has helped to reduce cigarette smoking by 32 percent in Maryland, almost double the national average, and by 40 percent among teens.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
The House of Delegates turned back a series of amendments Wednesday night seeking to derail a transportation revenue bill backed by Gov. Martin O'Malley, a strong indication that Democratic leaders have enough votes to raise the state's gas tax for the first time in more than two decades. After defeating 11 proposed amendments, the House gave the bill its preliminary approval, setting up a final vote before the end of the week. If it passes, it would go to the Senate. The plan would raise gas taxes by about $600 million a year when fully implemented in 2017.
NEWS
May 24, 2014
Republican Ron George releases the first commercial in his campaign for governor, an introductory spot that also chronicles his opposition to tax increases. What the ad says : George a two-term state delegate from Anne Arundel County, is shown with family members and at a jewelry store he owns in Annapolis. In one frame, he is with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., who is raising an arm and smiling, though Ehrlich has not endorsed anyone in the race for governor. "He did not aspire to be in government, but when his community called, he stepped up to the plate," a voice-over says.
NEWS
September 25, 1991
Delegate Richard C. Matthews, R-Carroll, has said he is strongly opposed to any proposed tax increases to offset the ever-expanding operating budget deficits.Budget deficits of $300 million for the current fiscal year and $675 million for the coming fiscal year have beenpredicted by the state's fiscal experts."I believe that we can balance the budget without a tax increase," Matthews said. "It's not going to be easy, but it can be done. Instead oflooking for ways to stick government's hand in the taxpayers' pocket again, we should direct our energies toward redefining and restricting government's role," he said.
NEWS
March 31, 1991
Editor's note: Rising costs, fewer state and federal dollars and falling county revenue have pushed Carroll's deficit over $5 million. The Budget Office has directed all county agencies to cut their budgetsby 1 percent for fiscal 1991, which ends June 30, and by 2 percent for fiscal 1992. . We have been asking readers where cuts should be made, whether taxes should be increased and related questions. Here aresome of the replies we received:From: Charles LindnerWestminsterI do not support any increase in the tax rate for any reason.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley says he still hopes to convince the legislature to raise money for highway and transit projects — possibly by adding another penny to Maryland's six-percent sales tax and dedicating the extra revenue to transportation. In an interview with The Baltimore Sun, O'Malley conceded that his initial proposal to apply the sales tax to gasoline is dead in the General Assembly. But he said an alternative would be a delayed implementation of that proposal, with the sales tax not being applied until gas prices fell to a certain level.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | April 13, 1994
No property tax increase, but a probable 4 percent raise in sewer customers' fees went on the table at a marathon Westminster City Council work session last night on a budget package -- capital, operating and utilities -- of about $11 million.The city staff proposed a 5 percent sewer rate increase, which finance director Stephen V. Dutterer said would translate to about $12 a year for a customer using 18,000 gallons of water per quarter. The council agreed by consensus on a 4 percent increase.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
Carroll legislators told municipal officials last night that they wouldn't support a tax increase even if the money was used to beef up local police protection."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- House leaders are readying a transportation bill that would cost nearly 50 percent more than President Bush has proposed and plan to pay for it with a 5-cent-per-gallon gasoline tax increase.The House bill would dedicate a minimum of $6.7 billion a year to mass transit -- twice as much as Mr. Bush wants to spend -- as part of an effort to shift the federal highway program away from its current interstate orientation and toward congested urban areas.The five-year, $153 billion proposal, to be introduced in about two weeks, was described yesterday by Representative Norman Y. Mineta, D-Calif.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
With varying degrees of aggressiveness and specificity, all seven candidates for governor are pledging to change Maryland's tax code. The ideas range from eliminating the income tax altogether (Republicans David Craig and Charles Lollar) to raising taxes on millionaires and multi-state corporations to pay for cuts for small businesses and most individuals (Democrat Heather Mizeur). But for all the talk among the Republicans and at least one Democrat (Douglas F. Gansler) of the dozens of tax and fee hikes approved under Gov. Martin O'Malley, there has been little attention paid to the tax that has gone up the most during the past eight years: the sales tax. At Mr. O'Malley's urging, the General Assembly approved an increase in the sales tax from 5 percent to 6 percent during a special legislative session in 2007.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Anne Arundel County Councilman Jamie Benoit this week proposed a way to drum up money to build a new high school in the county - a school that has been supported by parents in the Crofton area. Benoit wants to tap an obscure provision in the county's charter to create a dedicated fund to hold money for building a high school and repairing aging schools. He said the plan calls for diverting a portion of income tax the county receives into the fund. He said if he's successful in passing a bill to create the fund and funnel the money, he would follow up with a tax increase during budget negotiations in May to compensate the county's general fund for the money diverted to schools.
NEWS
February 24, 2014
It's a given that politicians like to spend money but they don't like to raise taxes. After all, the former makes them popular with their constituents and the latter has the opposite effect. Rarely is this more evident than in an election year. Marylanders may want to keep that in mind if they're bewildered by how less than one year after the General Assembly approved a major gas tax increase, lawmakers are back debating whether to raise transportation-related taxes again. To the outsider, it has the look of a pack of ravenous wolves squabbling over a recent kill while eyeing a deer across the meadow rather than being satisfied with the bounty before them.
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | January 16, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley released his fiscal year 2015 budget this week, and once again he made his long used but false claim that he has cut the state budget. The budget when Mr. O'Malley's first took office was $28.8 billion, according to the Department of Legislative Services; his latest proposal would spend $39.2 billion. The back of the envelope math tells us the budget has grown by $10.4 billion - an increase of roughly 36 percent. The legislature can cut from his proposal. Where are the cuts?
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
A year ago, it was difficult for taxpayers to do last-minute tax planning because of uncertainty surrounding expiring tax breaks from the Bush era. Lawmakers were at loggerheads on which, if any, deductions and credits to keep and whether to let tax rates rise. This year, uncertainty isn't a problem. The American Taxpayer Relief Act, signed into law in January, has left taxes much the same for households with incomes less than $250,000. And for those with income above that, the tax landscape is clear, too: They will owe Uncle Sam more.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | August 2, 2013
  Michael Plaisted said he wasn't pleased when he learned a few weeks ago that the annual property tax bill on his Ridgely's Delight condominium had jumped by hundreds of dollars. But he says he has become increasingly frustrated trying to get the City of Baltimore to tell him why the increase occurred. “All I want is an answer from the city saying this is the calculation we used and this is why your taxes doubled,” he said Friday. “I haven't gotten anything from the city.” By Friday, he said he had made three phone calls and sent one email to the city.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
So, letter writer Patrick Donoho, president of the Maryland Retailers Association, is worried that hard-working Marylanders won't be able to afford cigarettes if there is a tax increase ("Hike in cigarette tax threatens Md. Retailers," July 17)? This is actually a good thing as maybe it will be an incentive for Marylanders who can't afford cancer sticks to give them up - not just for their own health but for the sake of those around them too. And if convenience stores can only make their living off a substance that causes cancer, then it's time for them to either think of better ways to make money or to close up shop.
NEWS
July 16, 2013
President Obama's fiscal year 2014 budget includes an early childhood learning initiative that would be funded by a 94-cent per pack increase in the federal excise tax on cigarettes. The federal government will cover 91 percent of the costs in year one, but by year 10 of the program the states' funding obligations would rise to 75 percent. In 2009, when the federal government raised the cigarette excise tax, total tax paid sales of cigarettes dropped by more than 8 percent. The proposed cigarette tax hike, which is a 93 percent increase, could diminish tax-paid sales even further.
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