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NEWS
March 15, 2012
Did the editors of The Sun ever meet a tax increase they didn't like ("Pay now or later," March 14)? If the taxes that are collected for transportation were spent on transportation, there would be plenty of funds for transportation and no need for a gas tax increase. Instead, this fund has been repeatedly looted to support the ever-increasing state government. Unfortunately, with the Democrats' stranglehold on state government, we will pay now and pay later. The solution is obvious - except to Gov.Martin O'Malley and The Sun - reduce spending.
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BUSINESS
July 1, 2014
With gas prices on the rise again, West Baltimore resident Coralee Penner says she may sell the "gas-guzzling" Hummer H3 she's driven since 2007. Penner said she's considering replacing her SUV with a more compact car to save on gas. In the meantime, she's been driving less and planning more. "I deliberate for a while about where I'm going to go and if it's necessary and if I can combine trips and do everything in one go," said Penner at the North Charles Street Hess station, where regular fuel was $3.65 per gallon Monday.
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NEWS
December 21, 2011
Unless House Republicans come to their senses, it now seems likely that about 160 million Americans are about to get a tax increase that amounts to $1,000 for the average household and could knock down U.S. projected economic growth next year (already expected to be modest) by 25 percent. How absolutely insane is that? If the GOP devised a plan to make themselves look more irresponsible or more disinterested in the plight of average Americans and their thought-process more disordered, they could scarcely have devised anything more nefariously effective than what has happened in recent days to the proposed extension of the payroll tax break.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz released a budget proposal Tuesday that he says is part of a long-term plan to eliminate school overcrowding, resulting in a surplus of classroom seats by 2021. The county could face a shortage of 1,400 seats by then without aggressive funding, said Kamenetz, whose proposal was the final budget address of his current term. "If there is a shortage of seats, that means more trailers and larger class sizes," the county executive said at a news briefing before the budget unveiling.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
I was not at all surprised to read the headline on the front page of The Sun that "Democrats seek votes to raise gas taxes" (March 17). Take out the word, "gas," and this same headline would be appropriate for every session of the Maryland General Assembly in recent memory. Simply put, they always want to raise more taxes and fees - every year. And when they can't raise taxes enough in the regular session, they have a "special session" like the one Gov. Martin O'Malley called a few years back to raise the sales tax by 20 percent.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Senate Thomas V. Mike Miller, a longtime proponent of raising revenue for transportation projects, said it is unlikely that the General Assembly will pass Gov.Martin O'Malley's plan to increase gasoline taxes this spring and suggested trying again at a special session later this year. In remarks after Tuesday's Senate session, Miller said that once legislators have dealt with the hefty tax increases proposed to balance O'Malley's budget, he doubts lawmakers will be willing to consider another big tax hike.
NEWS
August 25, 2011
I find it absolutely incredible that any politician in a sound state of mind would consider implementing new taxes and/or raising existing taxes. The governor of this state hinted last week that additional taxes would be considered in 2012 ("O'Malley puts tax increases on the table for 2012 legislature," Aug. 20). With unemployment hovering around 10 percent and much higher in urban areas, record high food prices, high gasoline prices, high electric rates, and high natural gas and fuel oil prices, most families and small businesses are just making ends meet.
EXPLORE
February 10, 2012
Editor: All right, this is it. I have truly had enough. I cannot figure out how anyone in their right mind would think that a gasoline tax would be beneficial in any way to Marylanders. The poor and downtrodden already are having a difficult time finding and maintaining a job. How is making the "getting to it more difficult" going to help anyone? Should Marylanders sacrifice food and/or shelter so that they can get to work, only to come home to a box because they can't now pay rent or a mortgage?
NEWS
October 24, 2011
As readers of The Sun for over 40 years, we have never read a letter to the editor composed with such animosity than the recent letter from William Smith ("Gas tax brings out whiners," Oct. 19). Being high net worth individuals, we can easily afford another $3 to fill our gas tanks if, in his complete stupidity, Gov. Martin O'Malley gets away with adding 15 cents to the existing 23.5 cents per gallon we pay. After all, it's only a mere 63.8 percent increase. If we remember correctly, Mr. O'Malley ran on a no tax increase platform.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's proposed increase to the city's tax on bottle beverages is expected to move forward Monday after being corked up for months by a City Council committee. Council members, led by Council Vice President Edward Reisinger, plan to resort to a rarely employed legislative maneuver to bypass the committee and hold a vote on the measure, which is the centerpiece of the mayor's school construction funding package. "There's nothing in the city that's more important than our young people," said Councilman Brandon Scott, who intends to vote for the tax. "I can't kick the can down the road for school construction like it's been done for my entire life.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
[Adrian] Rousseau and [Thomas] Matthews not showing up to Monday night's debate at City Hall tells me they do not have what it takes to run a city. I have to give [John Mathew] Smith a mark for showing up, however he does not seem to have the knowledge or network of people that the current council knows and have.  The current council members all have backgrounds as directors or been involved in government work. This tells me they understand what it takes to run a city and spend our money wisely. They discuss the effects of changes needed and do their research before committing to a project. The current council has ties to state government representatives and knows whom to petition for grants and funds that will benefit our town. This council has brought our city forward with new improvements, and balanced the budget. We have not had a tax hike in six years.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
The city is looking for ways to ease the property tax burden on hundreds of homeowners who received unexpectedly high bills last month, officials said, as Baltimore reckons with past errors in a popular credit for historic renovations. The tax increases, which can be in the hundreds or thousands of dollars, have hit more than 300 people who had been underpaying because of miscalculations. Henry J. Raymond, deputy director of the Finance Department, cautioned that the city's options are limited.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
There is widespread agreement that the U.S. can become more competitive in the global marketplace if it lowers its corporate tax rate. There's also a consensus that the nation needs to spend more money on its vital infrastructure. So one might assume that a proposal to accomplish both — and one that would create thousands of jobs without adding to the deficit — would be greeted with a roar of approval. Hah, where have you been? The latest "grand bargain" President Barack Obama announced in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Tuesday drew immediate opposition from Republicans.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
I see that the new gas tax will bring expanded MARC commuter service from Baltimore and the Washington suburbs, a widening of Route 29 in Howard County and a widening the Baltimore Beltway ("Gas tax, tolls go up Monday," June 29). What I do not see is what is going to be done in Harford, Cecil, Garrett, Washington, Somerset or Saint Mary's counties, to name just a few. It seems Gov. Martin O'Malley has sucked up to his Democratic constituents around Baltimore and Annapolis and let the devil take the rest of the state.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Come Monday, driving around Maryland will cost more - both at the gas pump and the toll plaza. Marylanders will see a 3.5 cent rise in the state's gas tax - the first such increase in two decades - as well as toll rates that jump as much as 50 percent. The changes that take effect July 1 concern some residents. Trucking company president Tom Huseman is measuring the impact of both increases in thousands of dollars. Joseph L. DiBlasio of Essex is adjusting his commute to avoid the higher toll at the Fort McHenry Tunnel.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | June 12, 2013
Conservative Republicans in our nation's capital have managed to accomplish something they only dreamed of when tea partiers streamed into Congress at the start of 2011. They've basically shut down Congress. Their refusal to compromise is working just as they hoped: No jobs agenda. No budget. No grand bargain on the deficit. No background checks on guns. Nothing on climate change. No tax reform. No hike in the minimum wage. Nothing so far on immigration reform. It's as if an entire branch of the federal government -- the branch that's supposed to deal directly with the nation's problems, not just execute the law or interpret the law but make the law -- has gone out of business, leaving behind only a so-called "sequester" that's cutting deeper and deeper into education, infrastructure, programs for the nation's poor, and national defense.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold unveiled Friday his proposed budget for the next fiscal year at a time of slumping revenue and rising costs, calling for the first layoffs in nearly 20 years, 12 employee furlough days, a property tax increase and higher school spending to abide by state law. The $1.2 billion budget for county and school operations would boost spending 1.5 percent while closing a nearly $80 million gap between expenses...
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
An increase to Baltimore's bottle tax - the linchpin of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to raise funds to renovate the city's decrepit school buildings - received preliminary approval from the City Council Monday, likely assuring the measure will become law. The legislation would raise the tax on bottled beverages from 2 cents to 5 cents in July 2013. Supporters hailed the tax increase as a key step toward the biggest overhaul of city schools in decades. "We'll never catch up with generations of neglect of our schools buildings until we jump-start with a plan like the one before us today," said Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke as she cast her vote for the measure.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
Constance Kihm writes that she is leaving Maryland because she "can no longer afford to support fiscal and social programs with which we do not agree" ("Farewell, my Maryland, farewell to taxes, farewell to extreme liberalism," May 10). She resents that Maryland "feels it is entitled to increase the tax burden on our hard-earned retirement income. " I am a pensioner who turned 65 last year. I discovered that Maryland does not tax the first $27,100 of retirement income! This saved my wife and me about $4,000 in state and local income tax for 2012.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The gas tax increase Gov. Martin O'Malley signed into law Thursday will pay for weekend MARC service between Baltimore and D.C., roads and bridges throughout the state and construction on the Red and Purple lines to begin as soon as 2015. The first phase of the tax increase - 4 cents per gallon - will arrive in July, but officials already decided how to spend an $1.2 billion it will generate over the next six years. The tax is expected to increase at least three more times until July 2016, bringing the total tax increase to as much as 19.5 cents per gallon, according to state estimates released Thursday.  Here is the list of 10 projects officials announced immediately after the gas tax bill was signed:  $100 million to add weekend service to the MARC Penn line beginning this winter, two more round-trips on the Camden line during the week by next spring and new locomotives this summer.
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