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NEWS
By Joseph N. DiStefano and Joseph N. DiStefano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - To manage its far-flung financial interests, avoid local taxes, and shroud high-stakes deals from investor scrutiny, Enron Corp. organized a sprawling network of 2,000 corporate subsidiaries in 62 countries and 23 U.S. states. Hundreds of Enron units were set up in offshore tax havens such as the Cayman Islands; others, under the laws of Brazil, England, and other places where Enron did business, according to the bankrupt energy trading company's annual report. But the largest number of Enron subsidiaries - 685, not counting duplicate names - were set up in Delaware, where the creation and care of corporate entities is big business.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 7, 2013
The chemical and fertilizer plant in the town of West, Texas, where at least 15 were killed and more than 200 injured a few weeks ago hadn't been fully inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration since 1985. (A partial inspection by a different agency in 2011 resulted in $5,250 in fines.) OSHA and its state partners have a total of 2,200 inspectors charged with ensuring the safety of more than 8 million workplaces employing 130 million workers. That comes to about one inspector for every 59,000 American workers.
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TOPIC
By Lucy Komisar | June 17, 2001
THE BUSH TAX cut for the top 1 percent of richest Americans is worth $69 billion, nearly 38 percent of the total. People who protested that are virtually ignoring another Republican policy that "saves" the rich the same amount. Experts estimate that $70 billion in taxes are lost annually because many wealthy Americans hide money in tax havens, but Republicans in Congress and the White House are blocking efforts to stop this tax evasion. In some 60 "offshore" jurisdictions - places such as the Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, and Jersey - bank account owners are not identified and often use shell companies to hide their ownership.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
If you believe the following, you should vote for Mitt Romney: •You like a candidate changing his positions from one debate "performance" to the next stump speech (or when one of his handlers "corrects" his latest position) just to garner votes. •You still cling to the fantasy that a return to Bush-era tax cuts and policies, via the Romney/Rep. Paul Ryan agenda, will lead to more jobs and economic growth despite the disastrous economy George W. Bush left us in 2008. •You want government calling the shots when it comes to dictating women's reproductive health options.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | May 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Nearly half the estimated $233 billion U.S. corporations earned abroad in 2001 is held in foreign tax havens, up from 38 percent in 1999 and 23 percent in 1988, according to an analysis of recent Commerce Department data. The numbers come as the Internal Revenue Service and Treasury Department seek to increase corporate tax receipts in the face of huge federal budget deficits. Corporate taxes last year accounted for only 7.4 percent of total federal tax receipts, the second-lowest level on record after 1983.
NEWS
October 15, 2012
If you believe the following, you should vote for Mitt Romney: •You like a candidate changing his positions from one debate "performance" to the next stump speech (or when one of his handlers "corrects" his latest position) just to garner votes. •You still cling to the fantasy that a return to Bush-era tax cuts and policies, via the Romney/Rep. Paul Ryan agenda, will lead to more jobs and economic growth despite the disastrous economy George W. Bush left us in 2008. •You want government calling the shots when it comes to dictating women's reproductive health options.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - In trying to cut off the money supply of Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network, the Bush administration is embarking on a route strewn with obstacles and marked by past failure. Right now, no one seems to have a clear idea how much money bin Laden has, let alone where he keeps it. His personal fortune has been estimated at $2 million to $300 million, and he and his associates have started and closed enterprises in a number of countries in the Middle East, Africa and Europe.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
Senate budget plan will not raise taxes The Sun's editorial "Reality bites" (March 26) wrongly asserts that the budget adopted by the Senate assumes the president's tax cuts will expire in 2010. As one of the authors of the budget, I can assure readers that the Democratic budget makes no such assumption. Our budget does not include or require a tax increase. Quite to the contrary, our budget extends middle-class tax relief and provides a two-year fix for the alternative minimum tax. And it allows for new tax relief and the extension of other expiring tax cut provisions, as long as they are paid for. In fact, over the five years of our budget plan, projected revenues come to $14.827 trillion, which is almost identical to the $14.826 trillion in revenue the administration projects for that period under the president's budget plan.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Companies that have reaped the benefits of offshore tax havens have hired an array of powerhouse lobbyists - including one-time Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole - to beat back congressional efforts to crack down on the practice and eliminate the tax breaks they enjoy. Recognizing that there may be no way to stop Congress from taking high-profile action on the politically potent issue this year, the businesses are looking for ways to limit the damage. The companies are working through their influential advocates to hold on to the tax advantages gained from relocating overseas while fending off congressional attempts to deprive them of lucrative federal contracts.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 7, 2013
The chemical and fertilizer plant in the town of West, Texas, where at least 15 were killed and more than 200 injured a few weeks ago hadn't been fully inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration since 1985. (A partial inspection by a different agency in 2011 resulted in $5,250 in fines.) OSHA and its state partners have a total of 2,200 inspectors charged with ensuring the safety of more than 8 million workplaces employing 130 million workers. That comes to about one inspector for every 59,000 American workers.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | August 12, 2010
The Health Care for All Coalition is once again leading the charge to raise Marylanders' taxes to expand the state's government health care program, Medicaid. I'm reminded of what the White Queen said in "Through the Looking Glass": "It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards. " I guess my memory must be pretty poor, because I can't help but remember that we've heard this idea before. In 2007, Health Care for All pushed through a cigarette tax increase that was supposed to fund an expansion of Medicaid.
NEWS
April 3, 2007
Senate budget plan will not raise taxes The Sun's editorial "Reality bites" (March 26) wrongly asserts that the budget adopted by the Senate assumes the president's tax cuts will expire in 2010. As one of the authors of the budget, I can assure readers that the Democratic budget makes no such assumption. Our budget does not include or require a tax increase. Quite to the contrary, our budget extends middle-class tax relief and provides a two-year fix for the alternative minimum tax. And it allows for new tax relief and the extension of other expiring tax cut provisions, as long as they are paid for. In fact, over the five years of our budget plan, projected revenues come to $14.827 trillion, which is almost identical to the $14.826 trillion in revenue the administration projects for that period under the president's budget plan.
BUSINESS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | May 1, 2004
WASHINGTON - Nearly half the estimated $233 billion U.S. corporations earned abroad in 2001 is held in foreign tax havens, up from 38 percent in 1999 and 23 percent in 1988, according to an analysis of recent Commerce Department data. The numbers come as the Internal Revenue Service and Treasury Department seek to increase corporate tax receipts in the face of huge federal budget deficits. Corporate taxes last year accounted for only 7.4 percent of total federal tax receipts, the second-lowest level on record after 1983.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
In a ruling that could open a hidden vault of new tax revenue for Maryland, the state Court of Appeals ruled yesterday that companies doing business in Maryland cannot avoid the state's corporate income tax by funneling profits into subsidiaries in Delaware. The court ruled unanimously that two companies with Maryland operations were circumventing the state's tax laws by transferring profits to Delaware offices that "were little more than mail drops." The ruling concerned only two businesses and about $2 million in disputed taxes, but officials familiar with the cases said they could affect dozens of similar proceedings and perhaps hundreds of cases that have not reached the state court system.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Companies that have reaped the benefits of offshore tax havens have hired an array of powerhouse lobbyists - including one-time Republican presidential candidate Bob Dole - to beat back congressional efforts to crack down on the practice and eliminate the tax breaks they enjoy. Recognizing that there may be no way to stop Congress from taking high-profile action on the politically potent issue this year, the businesses are looking for ways to limit the damage. The companies are working through their influential advocates to hold on to the tax advantages gained from relocating overseas while fending off congressional attempts to deprive them of lucrative federal contracts.
NEWS
By Joseph N. DiStefano and Joseph N. DiStefano,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - To manage its far-flung financial interests, avoid local taxes, and shroud high-stakes deals from investor scrutiny, Enron Corp. organized a sprawling network of 2,000 corporate subsidiaries in 62 countries and 23 U.S. states. Hundreds of Enron units were set up in offshore tax havens such as the Cayman Islands; others, under the laws of Brazil, England, and other places where Enron did business, according to the bankrupt energy trading company's annual report. But the largest number of Enron subsidiaries - 685, not counting duplicate names - were set up in Delaware, where the creation and care of corporate entities is big business.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | May 5, 1996
AMID THE DEBATE of the proposed 27-cent property tax rate increase to fund next year's Carroll County budget, it was sometimes argued (in favor of the increase) that Carroll has the lowest rate ($2.35) in the region.That depends a lot on how you define the region, and how you determine the worth of public services included in that tax rate, such as trash collection, paid firefighters and police, and access to municipal water and sewage.What was missing from the discussion was the fact that nearly a quarter of the Carroll population is taxed at a higher rate than many of its Baltimore metro neighbors.
NEWS
By Marc Kilmer | August 12, 2010
The Health Care for All Coalition is once again leading the charge to raise Marylanders' taxes to expand the state's government health care program, Medicaid. I'm reminded of what the White Queen said in "Through the Looking Glass": "It's a poor sort of memory that only works backwards. " I guess my memory must be pretty poor, because I can't help but remember that we've heard this idea before. In 2007, Health Care for All pushed through a cigarette tax increase that was supposed to fund an expansion of Medicaid.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - In trying to cut off the money supply of Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network, the Bush administration is embarking on a route strewn with obstacles and marked by past failure. Right now, no one seems to have a clear idea how much money bin Laden has, let alone where he keeps it. His personal fortune has been estimated at $2 million to $300 million, and he and his associates have started and closed enterprises in a number of countries in the Middle East, Africa and Europe.
TOPIC
By Lucy Komisar | June 17, 2001
THE BUSH TAX cut for the top 1 percent of richest Americans is worth $69 billion, nearly 38 percent of the total. People who protested that are virtually ignoring another Republican policy that "saves" the rich the same amount. Experts estimate that $70 billion in taxes are lost annually because many wealthy Americans hide money in tax havens, but Republicans in Congress and the White House are blocking efforts to stop this tax evasion. In some 60 "offshore" jurisdictions - places such as the Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, and Jersey - bank account owners are not identified and often use shell companies to hide their ownership.
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