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Tax Fraud

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BUSINESS
December 3, 2009
Baltimore resident Michael Parker, formerly the chief operating officer of a Virginia firm specializing in tax breaks, pleaded guilty this week to defrauding the Internal Revenue Service of millions of dollars by fashioning phony tax shelters, the Justice Department said. During a hearing Tuesday in a U.S. District Court in Cincinnati, he admitted that he conspired with an accountant and attorney to pull off the scam, the agency said. As an officer with TransCapital Corp., Parker told prosecutors, he helped put together and market a tax shelter from 1998 through 2006.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Small businesses would be protected from the type of fraud allegedly committed by Harford County payroll firm AccuPay Inc. under legislation being proposed by Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski. The Maryland Democrat plans to introduce a bill that would require payroll service providers to register with the Internal Revenue Service and be either bonded or certified by the tax agency. It also would set federal penalties for payroll firms that fail to send clients' tax payments to the government.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Baltimore's biggest bail bondsman will plead guilty in a federal tax fraud and conspiracy case next week as part of a deal that spares his namesake son — and co-defendant — jail time and a felony record, which means the younger man can likely stay in the bond business. Milton Tillman Jr., 54, of Four Aces Bail Bonds Inc. was arrested alongside his son in March on a 28-count indictment charging the elder man with under-representing his earnings as a bail bondsman and over-representing the hours he worked as a longshoreman, along with wire fraud, filing false tax returns and illegally engaging in the insurance business.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
Former Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold stands alone among Maryland's recent crop of disgraced politicians in that he actually appears to feel disgraced by the recent airing of his misdeeds at trial. In one case after another — Sheila Dixon, Janet Johnson, Daryl Jones, Tiffany Alston, Ulysses Currie — elected officials have displayed precious little shame and regret for their illegal or unethical behavior. Upon his conviction for offenses related to the misuse of his executive protection detail and his scheduler for political and/or scatological purposes, Mr. Leopold not only resigned but acknowledged "serious errors in judgment.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun Reporter | January 31, 2007
A former state worker from Harford County received a 15-month prison sentence yesterday in federal court for tax fraud for using personal information from foster children to file for refunds. Clarenth Miles, 31, of Edgewood, had earlier pleaded guilty to conspiring to defraud the Internal Revenue Service. U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson also ordered Miles to pay restitution to the IRS in the amount of $102,054 and to pay more than $35,000 to two banks that issued pre-refund loans based on fraudulent tax returns.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
Milton Tillman Jr. and his namesake son, who co-ran Four Aces Bail Bonds in Baltimore, will be sentenced Friday in federal court for tax fraud, after a judge last week denied their request for a delay. Prosecutors plan to request a 51-month prison term for the elder Tillman, according to a plea agreement, and a year-long term for the younger man, to be served through community-based detention so he can keep the bail bonds company running. Both men pleaded guilty in December, with Tillman Jr. admitting to filing a false tax return, wire fraud and unlawfully engaging in the insurance industry, while Milton Tillman III pleaded guilty to one count of failing to file a tax return.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Staff Writer | August 20, 1993
A Baltimore man who conducted an electronic tax fraud scheme that bilked the U.S. government out of about $200,000 was sentenced yesterday to 27 months in prison.Joseph Vines Jr., 33, of the 1600 block of N. Patterson Park Ave., was one of three men who carried out the scheme between late 1991 and May 1992, prosecutors said.The men paid people for the use of their names and Social Security numbers, which were used in filing false income tax returns.Vines pleaded guilty in May to conspiracy to defraud the United States and making false claims to the government.
NEWS
April 13, 2001
Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Charles O. Rossotti met at his Baltimore office last week with Richard C. Gross, editor of The Sun's Opinion * Commentary page, for a tax-time discussion of the IRS and its problems. What problems does the IRS. have that most need solving? We have to provide better service to the average taxpayer when they call us up or need help in filling out their return or fixing their account with us. And we're making progress on that, but we have more to do. The other big problem is we've got to make sure that we are as effective as we can be at finding taxpayers who don't appropriately pay their taxes.
SPORTS
By Joe Sexton and Joe Sexton,New York Times News Service | July 21, 1995
NEW YORK -- Duke Snider and Willie McCovey, two baseball Hall of Famers whose images of power and dignity still sparkle for generations of the game's loyalists, pleaded guilty yesterday to federal tax fraud charges, saying they knowingly had failed to report thousands of dollars earned by signing autographs and participating in sports memorabilia shows.The two slugging legends stood under the glare of the fluorescent ceiling lights in federal court in Brooklyn, where they raised their right hands, swore to tell the truth, and pronounced themselves criminals.
BUSINESS
By Liz Pulliam Weston and Liz Pulliam Weston,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2002
My friend and I each have substantial amounts of cash. My balances are in the five digits, while my friend has more than $100,000. Our problem is that we owe substantial amounts to the IRS and other tax agencies. We want to park this cash someplace where it will be safe and we have access to it, but where the IRS can't find it. Please don't advise me to resolve my tax problems. I tried, and it's impossible! Baloney. Your issues - whatever they are - can be resolved, as soon as you abandon the idea that you can somehow hide your assets from the IRS. Find an attorney who specializes in solving tax problems and hire him or her. Your local bar association can offer referrals.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 26, 2011
The so-called "flat tax" is all the rage among Republican presidential hopefuls. Herman Cain was the first. Now, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich have come up with their own flat-tax proposals. The flat tax is a fraud. It raises taxes on the poor and lowers them on the rich. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimates that Mr. Cain's flat-tax plan (the only one that's been set out in any detail) would lower the after-tax incomes of poor households (incomes below $30,000) by 16 percent to 20 percent.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
Milton Tillman Jr. and his namesake son, who co-ran Four Aces Bail Bonds in Baltimore, will be sentenced Friday in federal court for tax fraud, after a judge last week denied their request for a delay. Prosecutors plan to request a 51-month prison term for the elder Tillman, according to a plea agreement, and a year-long term for the younger man, to be served through community-based detention so he can keep the bail bonds company running. Both men pleaded guilty in December, with Tillman Jr. admitting to filing a false tax return, wire fraud and unlawfully engaging in the insurance industry, while Milton Tillman III pleaded guilty to one count of failing to file a tax return.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Baltimore's biggest bail bondsman will plead guilty in a federal tax fraud and conspiracy case next week as part of a deal that spares his namesake son — and co-defendant — jail time and a felony record, which means the younger man can likely stay in the bond business. Milton Tillman Jr., 54, of Four Aces Bail Bonds Inc. was arrested alongside his son in March on a 28-count indictment charging the elder man with under-representing his earnings as a bail bondsman and over-representing the hours he worked as a longshoreman, along with wire fraud, filing false tax returns and illegally engaging in the insurance business.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2009
Baltimore resident Michael Parker, formerly the chief operating officer of a Virginia firm specializing in tax breaks, pleaded guilty this week to defrauding the Internal Revenue Service of millions of dollars by fashioning phony tax shelters, the Justice Department said. During a hearing Tuesday in a U.S. District Court in Cincinnati, he admitted that he conspired with an accountant and attorney to pull off the scam, the agency said. As an officer with TransCapital Corp., Parker told prosecutors, he helped put together and market a tax shelter from 1998 through 2006.
BUSINESS
By Tribune Newspapers | March 29, 2009
What's worse than paying taxes? Getting caught in a tax scam. Every year at tax time, fraudsters come up with new variations on scams involving bogus refunds, fake audits and sure-fire methods to avoid paying taxes. Whatever the method, the basic aim is to separate you from your hard-earned cash. Some might say the Internal Revenue Service has the same goal, but there's a big difference - if you lose money to a tax scam, you'll still owe your taxes. You can avoid most tax scams by remembering three basic rules: * The IRS never sends unsolicited e-mails.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 17, 2007
A federal judge dismissed charges yesterday against 13 former employees of the accounting firm KPMG, delivering a blow to prosecutors who once heralded the case as a showpiece in the government's crusade against questionable tax shelters. Judge Lewis A. Kaplan of U.S. District Court in Manhattan ruled that he had no choice but to dismiss the charges because the government had strong-armed KMPG into not paying the legal fees of defendants and violating their rights. The ruling severely hobbles a case - once billed by the government as the largest criminal tax case ever - that was filed in 2005 amid a government crackdown on questionable tax shelters.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Using computerized sleuthing, Comptroller William Donald Schaefer has identified scores of liquor retailers in Baltimore City and three counties that owe the state a combined $27 million in sales taxes, interest and penalties, with more collections expected as the program goes statewide in the months ahead. In what national observers say might be a first-of-its-kind approach, the comptroller is using computers to compare wholesale deliveries to liquor stores and bars with the taxes paid by the businesses.
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