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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Maryland retained its tenth-worst ranking in the Tax Foundation's latest study of state tax climates for businesses. The Tax Foundation, which released the latest of its annual rankings Wednesday, said Maryland's corporate tax rate is better structured than in many states - ranking 15th - and its sales tax made the top 10, in part because local jurisdictions don't have add-ons to the state rate. But the state's overall position was pulled down by its broader tax structure, including the rates it charges on individual income, unemployment insurance and property.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
As a retiree who held his first job at age 11 and who worked and paid into Social Security for 50 years and into Medicare since it's inception, that obnoxious diatribe by William Smith is an affront to retirees everywhere ( "Who needs those lazy retirees?" Aug. 19). The generalization that retirees are takers and welfare addicts is ridiculous. Perhaps he is speaking for himself. I went to night school for 17 years and earned four degrees while raising a family and trying to create a self-sufficient retirement.
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | April 23, 2012
Today - April 23 rd - is Tax Freedom Day for Marylanders, according to a survey by the Tax Foundation. That means we've earned enough money to pay this year's federal, state and local taxes. But on a national average, Tax Freedom Day for Americans occurred last week, April 17 th . So we have to work six extra days to pay off our tax bills. Other findings from the Tax Foundation: Marylanders aren't paying the highest taxes. Tax Freedom Day is May 5 th in Connecticut, May 1 in New Jersey and New York.
NEWS
By Andy Koenig | April 28, 2014
Contrary to popular belief, the most important tax day for Marylanders isn't April 15. It's today, April 28. That's when, on average, you finally earn enough money to pay off all of the taxes you owe for 2014. From tomorrow on, you can start to keep the money you make. The fact that it takes more than 100 days of work to pay off the tax man shows just how economically draining our tax burden really is. According to the Tax Foundation, 30 percent of the average American's annual income goes from workers' paychecks to the state, local and federal tax rolls.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
It's fair to say that the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan but conservative-leaning think tank, has not historically been a big fan of Maryland, or many other liberal northeastern states, for that matter. The group looks at one side of the equation - taxes - and not at the quality of what you get in return, and that tends to make Maryland look bad compared to, say, Wyoming. The Free State comes out 41st in the Tax Foundation's latest rankings of which states have the best tax climate for business, and the Equality State comes out on top. There are obviously other factors that go into a business' decision of where to locate - the presence of a skilled workforce, transportation infrastructure and the overall quality of life, for example - and the Tax Foundation acknowledges as much.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | January 18, 2012
Lists and rankings are surefire click bait and instant wisdom for Web surfers. The way to gain fame is to make the good lists -- Oscars, Forbes billionaires, best place to live etc.  Membership on bad lists summons notoriety, deserved or not. Worst dressed. 10 Things We Hate. Forbes billionaires! The Tax Foundation keeps the main tax scoreboard , listing states by income taxes, sales taxes and so forth. The most-often consulted rankings are those relying on tax rates -- the percentage tax people pay on a given dollar of retail sales, income, gross receipts or whatever.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | April 22, 1997
WASHINGTON -- As Americans were finishing up their income tax returns last week, they may have heard or seen some eye-popping figures from the Tax Foundation.It projected that "Tax Freedom Day" -- the day when the average American will have earned enough money to pay all taxes -- had been extended to "another new record" this year: May 9. And it said that on average Americans will spend 2 hours and 49 minutes of each working day laboring to pay taxes.A great many taxpayers probably heard these numbers and cursed the IRS. I heard them and thought, "There they go again."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun Reporter | October 27, 2007
The Maryland Public Policy Institute and the Washington-based Tax Foundation denounced Gov. Martin O'Malley's fiscal plan yesterday, saying it would decrease the state's ability to attract and expand businesses. "Lawmakers in Annapolis seem to believe they have little need to rein in spending," said Christopher B. Summers, president of the Maryland Public Policy Institute, which released a study saying past tax cuts are not to blame for the state's projected $1.7 billion deficit. "But it cannot tax itself out of this problem."
NEWS
March 11, 2010
Another round of Maryland budget battles is upon us. This year Marylanders' are facing a $2 billion budget shortfall, while our state legislature thinks they can continue to spend recklessly. The legislature needs to reduce spending and taxes. Why is Maryland's corporate tax rate 8.25 percent when Virginia's is 6 percent? How about a state and local income tax rate of 9 percent versus 5.75 percent in Virginia? In 2008 alone, Maryland lost population to 38 states, and a net assessable tax base of $993 million, while Virginia gained 153,000 new citizens, in the top 12 of the nation.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
As a retiree who held his first job at age 11 and who worked and paid into Social Security for 50 years and into Medicare since it's inception, that obnoxious diatribe by William Smith is an affront to retirees everywhere ( "Who needs those lazy retirees?" Aug. 19). The generalization that retirees are takers and welfare addicts is ridiculous. Perhaps he is speaking for himself. I went to night school for 17 years and earned four degrees while raising a family and trying to create a self-sufficient retirement.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
The effort to focus the post O'Malley era in Maryland on developing private sector businesses and jobs got a big boost Friday from the unprecedented joint agenda of House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. It's encouraging that the two top leaders in the General Assembly are both focused on the issue at the same time that most of the candidates for governor next year are talking about the same thing and private sector advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee are pursuing similar efforts.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
“Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.” - G.K. Chesterton With the gubernatorial campaign in full swing, and the Maryland General Assembly's legislative session less than two months away, we're going to see a lot of talk from state politicians about tax cuts and spending cuts. Most of what you'll hear or read about those issues will be pure prevarications. At a forum on state manufacturing, Democratic and Republican candidates supported the idea of cutting the state's corporate income tax rate . Attorney General Doug Gansler, a Democrat, and Republican candidates Harford County Executive David Craig, Del. Ron George and Charles Lollar all support some form of reduction in the corporate income tax rate.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
It's fair to say that the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan but conservative-leaning think tank, has not historically been a big fan of Maryland, or many other liberal northeastern states, for that matter. The group looks at one side of the equation - taxes - and not at the quality of what you get in return, and that tends to make Maryland look bad compared to, say, Wyoming. The Free State comes out 41st in the Tax Foundation's latest rankings of which states have the best tax climate for business, and the Equality State comes out on top. There are obviously other factors that go into a business' decision of where to locate - the presence of a skilled workforce, transportation infrastructure and the overall quality of life, for example - and the Tax Foundation acknowledges as much.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Maryland retained its tenth-worst ranking in the Tax Foundation's latest study of state tax climates for businesses. The Tax Foundation, which released the latest of its annual rankings Wednesday, said Maryland's corporate tax rate is better structured than in many states - ranking 15th - and its sales tax made the top 10, in part because local jurisdictions don't have add-ons to the state rate. But the state's overall position was pulled down by its broader tax structure, including the rates it charges on individual income, unemployment insurance and property.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Nearly 400 people packed a conference room Thursday to hear conservative leaders argue that Maryland is in critical need of a better business climate as big federal spending cuts loom. Change Maryland, a group started by a businessman who contemplated a run against Gov. Martin O'Malley in 2010, timed its first event well. The day before, the Pentagon warned that it would be forced to furlough most of its civilian defense employees, including 45,000 in Maryland, one day a week if the federal "sequestration" budget cuts begin March 1. State Del. Steven R. Schuh, an Anne Arundel County Republican, told the crowd at the Westin Annapolis hotel that Maryland has reaped years of benefits from high levels of federal employment and contracting, "but this policy of extreme dependence on federal spending has consequences.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
Regardless of whether the president and Congress strike a deal or take the nation headfirst over the "fiscal cliff," federal taxes for some Marylanders will increase next year — and under some scenarios the pain could be worse than in other states. Even if the White House and Republicans find middle ground by the end of the month, an agreement that includes higher tax rates for top income brackets — as the Obama administration has insisted — would likely have a disproportionate impact on wealthy Maryland.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | September 28, 2008
The Tax Foundation is out with its list of the most expensive counties for residential property levies. Amounts are for 2007. The highest, as usual, are the New York City suburbs, clocking in at a median annual tax of $7,000 or $8,000 per house. (Median means half the homes were taxed above those amounts and half below.) New York's Westchester County tops the list at $8,422. New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Illinois all have counties near the top of the rankings. The U.S. county with the least expensive median real estate tax is Apache County, Ariz.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2004
The revenue package passed by the House of Delegates this week could hurt Maryland's tax-burden ranking among the states but wouldn't make it the "tax hell" some critics predict, according to a respected research group. The state now ranks roughly in the middle of the pack in terms of state and local tax burden, according to the Washington-based Tax Foundation. William Ahern, spokesman for the group, said the net $670 million increase proposed by House Speaker Michael E. Busch could push it up to about 15th if other states hold their rates stable.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
Two of the more memorable observations to come out of Mitt Romney during the first presidential debate had to do with fibs and Big Bird. The candidate said that as the father of sons, he knows that repeating a lie doesn't make it true. As to the latter? Look out, "Sesame Street," your days as a "victim" on the federal dole are numbered. The two seemingly unrelated remarks are worth mentioning because they intersect in Mr. Romney's tax and budget plans which, even by the most generous of interpretations, don't add up. If President Barack Obama failed in the debate, it was in not making that point strongly enough.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
The early results of Maryland's sales tax holiday are in: Retailers liked it. So did their customers. But tax policy wonks? Not so much. It will be a couple of months before the state finds out just how much it lost in sales tax revenue during its third annual back-to-school tax holiday. The state had estimated that it would forfeit about $10 million by waiving the 6 percent sales tax on clothing and shoes of up to $100. Is this good fiscal policy? Probably not. Is this money that could be better spent elsewhere by the state?
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