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Tax Evasion

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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
A Baltimore criminal defense attorney has been charged in U.S. District Court with tax evasion and other financial crimes, according to records unsealed Tuesday, more than four months after his home and office were raided. Stanley Needleman, 69, is accused of "hoarding" $1.3 million in cash payments from criminal defense clients over a six-year period in order to conceal his income from the IRS. Needleman was charged by criminal information on Aug. 16. It is common for prosecutors to charge a person by criminal information if they expect the defendant to plead guilty.
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NEWS
By Jesse Jackson | December 22, 2013
Pope Francis is displaying an extraordinary style and passion that demands our attention. He addresses the needs of the poor, embraces outcasts, and loves those on the margins of society. In this recent "apostolic exhortation," The Joy of the Gospel, the pope raises a moral challenge to both his church and the world. Like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Pope Francis calls upon people of faith to "go forth" to preach and practice their faith. "I prefer a church," he writes, "which is bruised, hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets, rather than a church which is unhealthy for being confined and from clinging to its own security.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
A Laurel couple was sentenced to prison Friday for tax evasion, prosecutors said. Ronald Dean Bateson, 53, was sentenced to 15 months and his wife, 51-year-old Cynthia Bateson, was sentenced to 18 months for not filing tax returns for $1.4 million of income for a construction company they owned, according to a statement Friday from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. The couple operated a Columbia-based company called Bateson Construction Inc. that often acted as a subcontractor on commercial projects, the statement said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The owner-operator of a cosmetics company in Beltsville pleaded guilty Thursday to income tax evasion, prosecutors said. Bae Soo "Chris" Chon, 49, funneled revenue from Mirage Cosmetics Inc. into foreign bank accounts in Hong Kong and Seoul and understated his income on his personal income tax returns in 2008 and 2009, the U.S. Attorney's Office for Maryland said in a statement. Mirage manufactured cosmetics at a facility on Tucker Street in Beltsville and then sold the products in the United States at chain stores, including Walgreens, Target and Costco, the statement said.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2012
The owner-operator of a cosmetics company in Beltsville pleaded guilty Thursday to income tax evasion, prosecutors said. Bae Soo "Chris" Chon, 49, funneled revenue from Mirage Cosmetics Inc. into foreign bank accounts in Hong Kong and Seoul and understated his income on his personal income tax returns in 2008 and 2009, the U.S. Attorney's Office for Maryland said in a statement. Mirage manufactured cosmetics at a facility on Tucker Street in Beltsville and then sold the products in the United States at chain stores, including Walgreens, Target and Costco, the statement said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Stanley Needleman's 30-year law career officially came to an abrupt end Thursday when the criminal defense attorney pleaded guilty to tax evasion and agreed to pay more than $1 million in penalties. The plea came four months after agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided his downtown law office and Pikesville home, finding $1.15 million in unreported income inside two safes. Agents found a ledger detailing the cash payments from his legal clients, prosecutors said. "Any businessman who receives payments in cash faces the temptation to commit similar crimes — some fall to that temptation," said U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein in an interview after the hearing.
NEWS
July 4, 1993
Robert Poch of Potomac has been convicted on one count of tax evasion, U.S. Attorney Gary P. Jordan and IRS District Director H. J. Hightower announced Friday.He pleaded guilty Friday before U.S. District Court Judge John R. Hargrove Sr. in Baltimore. Poch was charged with income tax evasion and structuring monetary transactions in order to circumvent reporting requirements for the 1987 tax year.
NEWS
December 23, 1990
An Ellicott City man is one of two owners of a corporation who pleaded guilty last week to income tax evasion for tax year 1984, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Baltimore.Dr. Alagu Thiruvengadam, 56, of Ellicott City, and Dr. Ambrose Hochrein Jr., 51, of Olney, entered pleas before U.S. District Judge Norman Ramsey.The two men are owners of Daedalean Inc. of Woodbine, which is primarily engaged in defense contract work for the federal government.U.S. Attorney Breckinridge Willcox said last week that Hochrein and Thiruvengadam fraudulently failed to report income on their 1984 income tax return by employing various schemes that used their corporation and partnerships.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s recent column expressed the common view that most Greeks don't value "enterprise" because they've become dependent on overly generous government benefits that have ruined their economy ("America isn't Greece - at least not yet," Aug. 12). Yet I have struggled to reconcile the idea of the lavish public pensions he talks about with the images of newly homeless Greek pensioners picking through garbage for food as a result of EU-imposed austerity measures. Something seemed amiss.¿¿ The Greek government's financial problems come down to one thing: Tax evasion.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
Elinor Isabel "Judy" Agnew, who as the wife of former Baltimore County Executive, Maryland Gov. and Vice President Spiro T. Agnew preferred quiet domesticity to that of the political limelight, died June 20 in Rancho Mirage, Calif. She was 91. "She passed away very peacefully with all of her children at her side," a daughter, Susan Sagle of Palm Springs, Calif., said Thursday. "She died of natural causes and had been in failing health since 2005. " "Judy was truly a lady and a very outstanding second lady.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2012
The owner of a Frankford liquor store was sentenced Monday to 18 months in prison and six months of subsequent home detention for tax evasion after he understated the store's earnings by more than $1.5 million and structured bank deposits specifically to avoid IRS inquiries, according to prosecutors. Chung K. Choi, 47, of Woodbine, the owner of Frankford Garden Liquors in the 5400 block of Sinclair Lane, filed corporate tax returns from 2006 to 2009 that understated earnings at the store by $1,572,162, according to Maryland U.S. AttorneyRod J. Rosenstein.
NEWS
By Walter Olson | May 29, 2012
Laws are like fine nets, catching the common fish even as the biggest push their way through. Or so you might think on learning of how federal prosecutors keep nabbing small and medium-size businesspeople who violate an obscure law relating to bank paperwork, even as the best-known violator of the law so far (a certain well-connected politico named Eliot Spitzer) walks free. Last month, the feds swooped down on a successful Maryland dairy business, South Mountain Creamery, seizing $70,000 in its bank accounts and formally charging its owners, Randy and Karen Sowers, with the offense of bank "structuring.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
Regarding your report that Rep. Elijah E. Cummings' plans to make a charitable contribution of funds donated to his campaign by Richard Stewart, the politically connected businessman who pleaded guilty to tax evasion this month ("Brown returns funds from tax evader," Dec. 28): Congressman Cummings' proposal is the same as keeping the funds. Mr. Cummings received the money and benefited from its use. Now he wants to make a charitable contribution? Does he get a tax write-off for it?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley said Thursday that he will follow the lead of U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in returning donations from Richard Stewart, a political mover and shaker who pleaded guilty this month to tax evasion. Stewart's conviction brought calls from Maryland Republicans for Democrats who received donations from Stewart to return them. Cummings became the first prominent Democrat to announce he would do so, and Brown said this week that he has sent back $5,750 in contributions from Stewart.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | December 28, 2011
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown has returned $5,750 in campaign funds donated by Richard Stewart, a politically connected businessman who pleaded guilty this month to tax evasion. Brown is the latest Maryland Democrat to distance himself from Stewart, earlier this week a spokesman for U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings said the congressman would donate funds Stewart to a charity. Stewart, until last week, held two powerful appointed positions in Maryland politics. He was on five member panel charged with recommending new political lines for Congressional and legislative races for the next decade.
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