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Tax Cuts

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November 1, 2012
MEET THE CANDIDATES   When Marylanders head to the polls Nov. 6, they will elect members of the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in addition to casting their ballots for president. Dozens of people are running for a chance to represent the state's voters in Washington. The Baltimore Sun asked all major and third-party candidates to answer questions about pressing policy issues facing the country.   [ 1st Congressional District ] The 1st District was a political bellwether in the past two elections, but was redrawn by the Maryland General Assembly last year and is now more solidly Republican.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
The developers of Baltimore's casino will pay the city at least $11 million in their first year of operation - significantly less than terms proposed in 2009, but enough to help fund a small property tax cut for city homeowners, officials said. The details of the deal, which was approved by the city's spending board Wednesday, were made public this week. A local group headed by Caesars Entertainment Corp. will lease land near M&T Bank Stadium, where the company is to open a $375 million Harrah's casino in 2014.
NEWS
By David W. Wise and By David W. Wise | October 22, 2012
The almost two decades since the Clinton tax increase in 1993 have constituted a mighty experiment in macroeconomics. That period - more than a quarter of the entire postwar era - is divided into two periods of almost one half each, the first being a period following tax increases and the more recent period following two large tax cuts. The empirical evidence shows that the period following the tax increase experienced the largest peacetime expansion in U.S. history and the creation of 23 million jobs.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
Yes, letter writer Michael Stevens ("Romney can create jobs," Oct. 17), Mitt Romney has shown that he can create jobs - in China. He has shown repeatedly that he has no concern at all for the American worker, throwing them out of work and sending their jobs abroad without any compunction or thought except to make even more money for himself. (And then to pay way less tax on that money than the people he put out of work were paying). He has shown dislike and disdain for the American worker and anyone who makes less money than he and his cronies make - as evidenced by his remarks about the 47 percent of Americans who he claims take no responsibility for themselves.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | October 11, 2012
"Now Gov. Romney believes that with even bigger tax cuts for the wealthy, and fewer regulations on Wall Street, all of us will prosper. In other words, he'd double down on the same trickle-down policies that led to the crisis in the first place. " -- President Barack Obama in an ad released Sept. 27. This is President Obama's core message. In one way or another, he says it all the time. It's his kicker on the stump. You cannot watch an interview with the president or one of his subalterns without hearing it. And yet, I don't think I've ever heard a TV interviewer, host or pundit ask, "What are you talking about?"
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 11, 2012
It's been a tough several years, and things may be easing, if only a little. Or maybe we're just getting used to it. The news that Harford County Executive David R. Craig is proposing a 4 percent pay raise for county government employees, sheriff's deputies and library staff no doubt comes as welcome news for those who can expect to be paid a little more for their services. After all, with a couple notable exceptions, most of the folks haven't seen pay raises since mid-2008, just before the economy tanked.
NEWS
October 10, 2012
As this page has devoted much ink to criticizing Republicans in Congress for hardening their positions on matters of federal tax and budget policy to the point where compromise is impossible, it is beyond disappointing to see a leading Senate Democrat engaging in similar behavior. Whether it's equivalent or not, Sen. Charles E. Schumer went too far this week when he rejected any possibility of lower tax rates for the wealthy. Mind you, we understand where Senator Schumer is coming from.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | October 2, 2012
If a politician rose in the well of Congress to urge his colleagues to take action to repel the recent Martian attack, he'd be laughed out of office and strongly encouraged to get his head examined. Pondering solutions to imaginary problems is public policy insanity. So I ask: Given that the threat of socialism swallowing America is as imaginary as a Martian invasion, why aren't politicians and television pundits who warn that something must be done to reverse redistributive welfare in the United States also treated with dismissive ridicule?
NEWS
By Peter Morici | September 10, 2012
The economy added 96,000 jobs in August, down from 141,000 in July and not nearly enough to keep pace with population growth. The unemployment rate fell to 8.1 percent only because 581,000 workers quit looking for work and are no longer counted in the tally. In the weakest recovery since the Great Depression, the entire reduction in unemployment from its 10 percent peak in October 2009 has been accomplished through a significant drop in the percentage of adults participating in the labor force - either working or looking for work.
NEWS
September 8, 2012
Perhaps it was the expectations raised by his far more eloquent appearances at earlier conventions, or maybe it was the modest ambitions he embraced, or that he labored in the shadow of Bill Clinton's rousing defense of his administration, but even the most hard-core Democrat would have to concede that President Barack Obama's acceptance speech to his party's national convention was neither especially memorable nor ambitious. If the message of the Republican National Convention can be distilled to, as Mr. Clinton memorably described it, "we left him a total mess, he hasn't cleaned it up fast enough, so fire him and put us back in," then perhaps the Democratic National Convention might be boiled down to "we're doing the best we can with this mess so be patient, and, oh, by the way, that other guy would be a lot worse.
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