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BUSINESS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | December 5, 1992
The judge said his heart was with the Baltimore Chronicle i the community newspaper's fight against the big-city dailies and the state comptroller's office. The law, however, was not.Accordingly, the ma-and-pa paper was turned down yesterday in its bid for an exemption from about $8,000 in back sales taxes, a tab that the paper's owners say could muffle the paper's alternative voice."I have to suppress my own ideas in making this ruling," Chief Judge Robert I. H. Hammerman said during a hearing yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court.
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NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | November 3, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A husband-and-wife team with a modest legal practice in Prince George's County handled their own case and beat the federal tax collector yesterday -- in the highest court in the land.With silent support from the Supreme Court, Clayton J. Powell Jr. and Darlene Wright Powell of Mitchellville need only go to the U.S. Tax Court to seal their victory. The Supreme Court turned down flat an appeal by the Internal Revenue Service. As is usual with that kind of action, the justices did not explain.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Corporate America escaped a major new tax bite yesterday as the Supreme Court unanimously turned down a plea to allow states to levy a tax on a portion of total income earned by companies that operate inside their borders.By a separate 5-4 vote, the court gave the benefit of that ruling specifically to Allied-Signal Inc., the company that took over the former Bendix Corp.The case had been watched closely by American business, since the court had hinted that it might use the decision to make a fresh start on the constitutional rules governing state taxes on firms that operate in more than one state.
BUSINESS
By Linda Greenhouse and Linda Greenhouse,New York Times News Service | March 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to resolve an escalating legal dispute over what requirements taxpayers who do some of their work at home must meet to qualify for a home-office deduction.The question, which the justices will not decide until next year, pits the U.S. Tax Court against the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS has long regarded home-office deductions with suspicion as an area of abuse.Two years ago, Tax Court judges rejected the IRS position and adopted a taxpayer-friendly interpretation of the relevant provision of the Internal Revenue Code.
BUSINESS
By Myron Lubell and Myron Lubell,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 16, 1992
As your prepare your 1991 income tax returns, be careful how you treat that condo at Ocean City or Deep Creek Lake. Here are some tips for preparing tax returns on rental property.Losses generated from rental property are normally deductible, though they are limited by various phaseout and carry-over provisions. However, losses derived from renting a vacation home are subject to additional restrictions.A vacation home is rental property that has been used by the taxpayer for personal purposes for more than 14 days during the tax year or more than 10 percent of the number of days the home is rented at a fair rental value, whichever is greater.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | September 28, 1991
For almost a year, Gov. William Donald Schaefer campaigned for a sweeping package of tax reforms that included expanding the sales tax to providers of services. But by the end of the legislative session in April, the General Assembly had rejected the entire package.This week, Noble Steed Associates Inc., a Baltimore advertising agency, appealed a Maryland Tax Court ruling that the agency believes could create judicially the services tax the legislature rejected.The state comptroller's office disputes the significance of the case, filed in the Baltimore County Circuit Court, arguing that the taxes it demanded of Noble Steed have been legitimate parts of Maryland's tax law for years.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | July 3, 1991
A Baltimore County Circuit Court judge has ordered the county to refund more than $600,000 in electricity taxes to five companies, agreeing with a lower court that the companies were overtaxed.The county immediately announced it would appeal to the Court of Special Appeals and Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Sr. stayed his order."We hope we will be vindicated on appeal," says Michael McMahon, an assistant county attorney on the case. "If we lose, then we have to come up with the money."Should Baltimore County lose on appeal, the court case could have an impact on four other counties and the city, which have similar taxes on the consumption of electricity.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | February 6, 1991
Five Baltimore County companies charged yesterday that the county has been illegally collecting taxes on their electricity bills -- raising the specter that the government might have to refund several million dollars to area businesses.The five companies -- A.M.G. Resources, Blue Circle Atlantic, Eastern Stainless Steel, Genstar and House of Seagrams -- had already won agreement from the Maryland Tax Court that a portion of the 7.5 percent tax on their electricity bills shouldn't have been collected.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1990 Los Angeles Times Syndicate Times Mirror Square Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 | February 6, 1991
If you are unemployed or at a dead end in your career, you may decide to return to school to acquire new skills. Are there any tax benefits? Perhaps -- since there are no specific statutory provisions to indicate the boundaries of the educational deduction.There is a general provision that "ordinary and necessary expenses paid or incurred [while] carrying on a trade or business" can be deducted. This is troublesome for someone who is unemployed, says David M. Hudson, professor of law at the University of Florida and a contributing editor to Bender's Federal Tax Service.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | February 5, 1991
In a case that could cost five Maryland counties and Baltimore millions in lost revenue, five companies today were to present their case to change the way their use of industrial electricity is taxed."
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