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The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Baltimore police said Sunday morning that they were continuing to investigate several home invasion robbery schemes committed against senior citizens in the city's Greektown and Locust Point areas. Victims have received calls from a person posing as a Baltimore tax collector who alleges that the victims' property taxes have not been paid or are overdue, police said. The caller then says that if the money is not paid immediately, the victims will be evicted from their homes by law enforcement, police said.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 8, 2014
Maryland stands to lose about $5 million in tax revenue next week. And that's just fine with the state's chief tax collector, Comptroller Peter Franchot. Franchot said the state's annual tax-free shopping week, which starts Sunday, gives a boost to consumers and Maryland retailers at the height of the back-to-school season. The comptroller arrived at Mondawmin Mall Friday to kick off Shop Maryland week. Then with Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake along to offer advice, the comptroller went shopping at the mall's Shoe City and bought socks.
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NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2001
The state's No. 1 tax collector has been hit with a tax increase, but he's not taking it lying down. The taxman, state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, is appealing the property tax assessment of two townhouses he owns in Anne Arundel County. "Here I am the tax collector, and here I am appealing all over the place," Schaefer said yesterday. But he maintained that he has his reasons. "I almost fell out of my chair," he said, recalling his reaction to the increased assessments on the two townhouses.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2013
Officials from Baltimore's finance office and the state assessments agency have been at odds - sometimes vocally so - over the accuracy of historic tax credits and who's to blame for bureaucratic confusion that has left hundreds of city property owners unsure of what they owe the tax collector. But when the chairman of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee asked for more information, the two agencies found a way to be on the same page, quite literally. In late September, city finance director Harry E. Black and state assessments chief Robert E. Young began drafting a joint letter to Sen. Edward Kasemeyer, whose district incudes parts of Howard and Baltimore counties.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2004
With July a week old, thousands of homeowners in several Maryland counties were beginning to think they'd been blissfully forgotten by their local tax collector - but they were wrong. Property tax bills in Howard and Wicomico counties that usually go out June 30 are just starting to arrive in mailboxes because of software problems. Officials in Cecil, Frederick, Calvert and Washington counties mailed bills on time but reported other problems with Munis, a Falmouth, Maine-based division of Dallas-based Tyler Technologies that produces the counties' tax software.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
ST. LEONARD -- In the more than 300 years since his violent death, the life and memory of Christopher Rousby have been commemorated, miscalculated, relocated and all but obliterated. And now, after all these years, the long-ago tax collector for the king still can't seem to find a proper resting place. Rousby, who was killed at the hands of a cousin of Lord Baltimore in 1684, was buried under a 1,000-pound slab of limestone soon after his death. If only he was left there in peace. At some point after his burial, his remains were lost.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 15, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- It has been a wretched year for Carlos Peralta, a swaggering young cellular-phone tycoon.First, he was caught up in a corruption scandal, with the revelation that he had funneled millions of dollars to the brother of former Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari. That led to his ouster as vice chairman of his company, Grupo Iusacell.But perhaps the worst news came in a phone call to his Mexico City home one recent morning: Peralta had been indicted for tax fraud.The indictment came about the time Mexicans, like Americans, face their annual tax deadline -- and symbolized a dramatic change in Latin America.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | March 15, 1994
What do you give a tax collector on his 81st birthday?For Maryland's longtime comptroller, Louis L. Goldstein, the gifts were many last night -- an autographed team basketball from the NCAA tournament-bound University of Maryland Terrapins, a letter from the president of the United States and pictures of the honoree himself in a big frame.But most of all, you throw him a big party with an 8-foot-long birthday cake and invite the entire General Assembly to attend -- which only makes sense because you're holding it in the chamber of the House of Delegates.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
We need to vote for Question 7. Table games will bring jobs to our state along with money for education. Do not let the opponents fool you. The people in office took the $350 million for other projects that was education money. Casinos bring a lot of money into our state. Why is our own comptroller against gaming tables? Any tax collector in any other state would welcome the millions of dollars to be reaped from gaming tables and the slot machines. I play the slots once a year in New Jersey.
NEWS
April 16, 2001
GIVEN THE obstacles thrown in its path, it's amazing the Internal Revenue Service handles tax collection as well as it does. By the time this year's income-tax deadline passes tonight, the federal agency will have received 215 million returns (130 million from individuals) and collected more than $2 trillion for government operations. Yet as the number of tax returns rose by 13 percent over the past nine years, Congress cut the IRS' workforce by 17 percent. Automation hasn't made up the difference because the IRS' computers are a stunning 35 years old. That's Stone Age technology by today's standards.
NEWS
By Michael Harvey | July 2, 2013
"How can a man who collects taxes," Gov. William Donald Schaefer asked at Louis L. Goldstein's 81sth birthday party in 1994, "be so popular?" That is perhaps the greatest achievement of this great Marylander, who was born 100 years ago, and who died 15 years ago tomorrow, on July 3, 1998. In our own time of cynicism and distrust about politics, it's easy to overlook what this steady, tireless public servant achieved: He made good government popular. Louis L. Goldstein was born in 1913 in Calvert County, son of a Jewish immigrant from Eastern Europe.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
We need to vote for Question 7. Table games will bring jobs to our state along with money for education. Do not let the opponents fool you. The people in office took the $350 million for other projects that was education money. Casinos bring a lot of money into our state. Why is our own comptroller against gaming tables? Any tax collector in any other state would welcome the millions of dollars to be reaped from gaming tables and the slot machines. I play the slots once a year in New Jersey.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Baltimore police said Sunday morning that they were continuing to investigate several home invasion robbery schemes committed against senior citizens in the city's Greektown and Locust Point areas. Victims have received calls from a person posing as a Baltimore tax collector who alleges that the victims' property taxes have not been paid or are overdue, police said. The caller then says that if the money is not paid immediately, the victims will be evicted from their homes by law enforcement, police said.
NEWS
October 20, 2011
Why not give school boards in Maryland the authority to raise money through property tax levies? That's a question officials in Frederick County are raising, and it's a timely issue in a state where public schools, and the adequate financing of them, are said to be a top priority. Currently, school systems rely on a combination of local, state and federal sources of money, much of it coming through formulas that set minimum per-pupil funding. For county government, the frustration is one of accountability - county executives, councils or commissioners must set the tax rates and ensure the adequate financing of schools, but boards of education get to decide exactly how the funds will be spent.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
In his latest backpedaling to raise taxes on the rich, President Obama says "This is not class warfare - it's the math. " So let's look at the math, together with history. First the math: Obama's "Buffett Rule" millionaire's tax fails to take into account that Berkshire-Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett by choice draws a salary of only $100,000, which is subject to the regular income taxes we all pay. But the majority of Mr. Buffett's income comes from capital gains and dividends on the investments he owns, which are taxed at 15 percent - as they should be, since that tax is on money that has already been taxed once before.
NEWS
July 29, 2011
In a recent Sun article regarding the state of Maryland's efforts to ensure that online travel websites are remitting their appropriate amount of sales tax ("Md. Officials go after taxes from travel websites," July 21), the reporter stated that I have "made no public progress" on an audit that was requested by Gov. Martin O'Malley. While I applaud Governor O'Malley's commitment to tax fairness, particularly at a time when the tough economy has taken its toll on the finances of our state and the taxpayers we serve, I feel obligated to reinforce a critical fact for your readers.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2004
Americans are very patriotic - except when it comes to paying taxes. As Mark Twain put it, "The difference between a taxidermist and a tax collector is that the taxidermist leaves the skin." Anger over taxes spawned our very republic. "Taxation without representation" was the cry at the 1773 Boston Tea Party. Patriots dumped 342 crates of British tea into Boston Harbor to protest a Tea Act that raised the price of all tea except that produced by one British supplier. Mobster Al Capone was infamous for his violent and illegal Prohibition liquor trade, but was ultimately found guilty of income tax evasion.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1998
An article in The Sun yesterday overstated one of the responsibilities of the Maryland comptroller's office. The comptroller is responsible for overseeing all tax revenue taken into the state treasury. The remaining 30 percent of the state's revenue is handled directly by the Maryland treasurer's office.The Sun regrets the error.Louis L. Goldstein made being comptroller of Maryland's treasury look easy.The reality is that the comptroller's office is a complex and powerful department, a huge operation -- 1,150 employees and a $93.7 million annual budget -- that oversees all the money that comes into and goes out of the state treasury.
NEWS
April 18, 2011
Baltimore's favorite son, greatest cheerleader and most irascible politician is gone. By any measure, William Donald Schaefer, who died Monday at age 89, was an extraordinary man. Sixteen years on the Baltimore City Council, 15 as the city's mayor, eight as Maryland governor and another eight as comptroller — few have had as much impact in shaping the city and state. He could be demanding, testy, mercurial, insufferable really. His mantra was "do it now," and he didn't mean next week or even the next day. As much as he appreciated publicity, he didn't always care for the reporters and editors who covered him — and wasn't shy about saying so. The salute he offered many of them required only one finger.
NEWS
October 11, 2010
Very recently I have heard of several cases of the outrageous $250 double parking fines in Baltimore. The amount of the fine isn't related to the seriousness of the crime. It is a sad day when you stop looking at the police as your friend but rather as a tax collector hiding behind a billboard waiting to pounce. The worst case that I know of personally happened recently in our block. Meals on Wheels, which delivers food to housebound people, has a pickup station here. Three cars waiting to load food for delivery were each given a $250 ticket.
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