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NEWS
June 7, 2013
I must admit I don't feel terribly sorry for the tea party folks and their difficulties with the Internal Revenue Service ("New charges against the IRS," June 5). The problem isn't with the IRS, which may have been guilty of sloppy workmanship, but with the tax code that allows political action groups to call themselves "social welfare agencies" and hide their donor lists from public scrutiny. Political advocacy groups must be required to divulge their financial transactions and lists of donors to public review.
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NEWS
July 22, 2014
If your roof starts leaking live a sieve, it's not only prudent to get a new roof but to install a short-term fix - buckets to catch the water, perhaps, or a tarp - before your house is ruined. So should it be with so-called tax inversions by U.S. corporations. The long-term answer may be tax reform, but right now the leaks have to be plugged. What is a tax inversion? It's when a big U.S.-based multinational buys a company off-shore and then ships its own corporate headquarters there to avoid paying U.S. federal and state corporate taxes.
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NEWS
October 10, 2013
It's fair to say that the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan but conservative-leaning think tank, has not historically been a big fan of Maryland, or many other liberal northeastern states, for that matter. The group looks at one side of the equation - taxes - and not at the quality of what you get in return, and that tends to make Maryland look bad compared to, say, Wyoming. The Free State comes out 41st in the Tax Foundation's latest rankings of which states have the best tax climate for business, and the Equality State comes out on top. There are obviously other factors that go into a business' decision of where to locate - the presence of a skilled workforce, transportation infrastructure and the overall quality of life, for example - and the Tax Foundation acknowledges as much.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
With varying degrees of aggressiveness and specificity, all seven candidates for governor are pledging to change Maryland's tax code. The ideas range from eliminating the income tax altogether (Republicans David Craig and Charles Lollar) to raising taxes on millionaires and multi-state corporations to pay for cuts for small businesses and most individuals (Democrat Heather Mizeur). But for all the talk among the Republicans and at least one Democrat (Douglas F. Gansler) of the dozens of tax and fee hikes approved under Gov. Martin O'Malley, there has been little attention paid to the tax that has gone up the most during the past eight years: the sales tax. At Mr. O'Malley's urging, the General Assembly approved an increase in the sales tax from 5 percent to 6 percent during a special legislative session in 2007.
NEWS
By Michael Faulkender | May 23, 2013
The report of Apple avoiding corporate income taxes the past four years signals it's time to overhaul the U.S. corporate tax code. Like many multinationals with strong intellectual property, Apple legally earns nearly all of its income offshore. The U.S. tax code requires payment of corporate income taxes on domestic operations, but foreign earnings are not taxed until they are returned to the U.S. parent company, an act called repatriation. According to Senate investigators, Apple has structured its foreign operations to avoid a foreign income tax liability as well.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
It has been reported that House Speaker John Boehner is backing a compromise on taxing those "rich" Americans who make over $1 million a year. Unfortunately, that threshold, as well as President Barack Obama's proposal to increase taxes on those making over $250,000 at the Clinton era tax rate, is not going to solve the long term deficit problem, especially while spending remains out of control as it has been during Mr. Obama's presidency....
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Nearly half of taxpayers have yet to file their federal tax returns, although the deadline is just about two weeks away. Many of them are holding off to the last minute because they owe taxes, of course. But some likely are waiting for answers. The U.S. tax code grows more complicated each year, often leaving taxpayers uncertain about whether they qualify for deductions or not. And a bumpy economy has left many taxpayers yearning for bigger refunds. So this year tax professionals say they are fielding more questions than ever about debt, the homebuyer credit, Roth IRA conversions and any obscure deductions filers could be overlooking.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 19, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Junk the current tax code. Eliminate the Internal Revenue Service. Create a tax system that is fair to everyone and encourages investment, saving and entrepreneurial capitalism.Such is the plan of the National Commission on Economic Growth and Tax Reform, created with private funds at the behest of Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole and House Speaker Newt Gingrich.For more than 50 years we have been subsidizing behaviors we once discouraged, such as sloth and indolence, irresponsibility, unaccountability and sexual promiscuity.
NEWS
By Noam Neusner and Lawrence J. Haas | December 11, 2006
The midterm elections that gave control of Congress to the Democrats also brought widespread predictions of paralysis in Washington. But is divided government a recipe for inaction? Not necessarily. Divided government can produce good policy, especially on the budget, while one-party rule does not guarantee positive results. We learned these lessons firsthand while working inside the budget machinery of the White House under two different administrations. During the Clinton years, a Democratic president and a Republican-led Congress exchanged frequent rhetorical fire but ultimately produced some of the best federal fiscal policies in decades - balancing the budget, limiting spending, and still investing more in education, research and other priorities.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 14, 2003
MANCHESTER, N.H. - Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman proposed an overhaul of the federal tax code yesterday that would lower tax rates on middle-class families while raising taxes, sometimes substantially, on wealthier Americans. Speaking to about 250 supporters and onlookers at a presidential campaign rally, the Connecticut Democratic said his plan would "restore integrity and fairness" to the code by shifting more of the burden to wealthy individuals and corporations. The plan calls for lower tax rates on individuals earning less than about $70,000 and families earning less than $115,000.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 4, 2014
Just when most of us are becoming accustomed to marking dated items with 2014, the year just ended will be in all-too-sharp focus for a day or two in the coming weeks for most people. It's tax season and that means it's time to start at least thinking about those 2013 tax forms. As usual, the deadline to file falls in mid-April, Tuesday, April 15. Starting about now as most people are receiving the W-2 forms that report annual income along with various other tax documents, the prospect of a day of navigating the twisted language of the instruction booklets looms large.
NEWS
November 5, 2013
A family that takes a second and a third mortgage may be in danger of losing the family home. A nation raising its debt ceiling again and again is in danger of losing its future. I think that many people are willing to do something, but what can we do? I recommend a process where small groups come together all over the country to simplify and clarify our laws. Let us start with the Farm Bill. Small groups could include family farmers, ranchers, a representative of an agri-business, an agricultural extension agent, a volunteer lawyer.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
While it's not uncommon for any negotiation to begin with a degree of doubt, it's difficult to imagine any launched with as little optimism as accompanied the opening last week of federal budget talks. That President Barack Obama could possibly still be voicing any expectation of a "grand bargain" reaching far into the future suggests an outlook shared only by those who play multi-state lotteries and bet the pick six at the race track. For all the derision and falling poll numbers that Congress, and particularly the Republicans, suffered during last month's government shutdown and near-default that began with a desire to "defund" Obamacare but later spread to the overall budget and beyond, the party's basic positions on tax and spending fundamentals look little changed.
NEWS
October 25, 2013
A family that takes a second and a third mortgage may be in danger of losing the family home. A nation raising its debt ceiling again and again is in danger of losing its future. I think that many people are willing to do something, but what can we do? I recommend a process where small groups come together all over the country to simplify and clarify our laws. Let us start with the farm bill. Small groups could be family farmers, ranchers, a representative of an agri-business, an agricultural extension agent, a volunteer lawyer.
NEWS
By Arne Sorenson and Martin Knott | October 14, 2013
At testy town halls and heated street corner encounters, members of Congress from both parties are hearing from voters like us who are frustrated by the partisan gridlock in Washington. We are tired of hot air and want to see action to heat up our economy, whether it's on immigration reform that will create new jobs or on the ongoing government shutdown and debt ceiling showdown that Congress must find a way to solve. The two of us run businesses based in Maryland. At first glance, you might think that's where the similarities end: Arne's company, Marriott International, operates in more than 70 countries and territories worldwide and counts its number of employees in the six figures.
NEWS
October 10, 2013
It's fair to say that the Tax Foundation, a non-partisan but conservative-leaning think tank, has not historically been a big fan of Maryland, or many other liberal northeastern states, for that matter. The group looks at one side of the equation - taxes - and not at the quality of what you get in return, and that tends to make Maryland look bad compared to, say, Wyoming. The Free State comes out 41st in the Tax Foundation's latest rankings of which states have the best tax climate for business, and the Equality State comes out on top. There are obviously other factors that go into a business' decision of where to locate - the presence of a skilled workforce, transportation infrastructure and the overall quality of life, for example - and the Tax Foundation acknowledges as much.
NEWS
By Marilyn Geewax | April 14, 1998
ATLANTA -- As they devote the precious weekends of early spring to searching for tax records and filling out forms, millions of Americans share a single sentiment about our tax code: There must be an easier way. A flat income tax or a national sales tax are much-discussed alternatives to our annual filing agony. But while those options may sound attractive, especially around April 15, millions of taxpayers would be furious if Congress were to make the one change essential to implementing either plan: elimination of the home mortgage tax deduction.
NEWS
March 16, 1998
The Philadelphia Inquirer said in an editorial Thursday:THE dumbing down of American politics continues apace.Now we have "Kill the code," not just as a slogan sneered at the tax system, but as an empty-headed bill that might actually pass Congress this election year.The bill would kill the current federal tax system by 2001. It is silent on what ought to replace it.The supposed rationale is that national leaders won't reform the system unless they have a deadline.In fact, what really appeals to congressional leaders about this time bomb against the status quo is that it makes them look like bold reformers in time for the election -- without forcing them to decide on a new system.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Ben Cardin has been pressing for what he calls a progressive consumption tax since he first arrived in Congress. More than 26 years later, the Maryland Democrat thinks the idea may have its best shot in a long time. Cardin, a member of the Senate Finance Committee, told reporters Thursday he is beginning to dig into the details of how such a tax might be structured and, perhaps, included in the sweeping overhaul of the federal tax code lawmakers in both parties are contemplating.  The proposal is broadly similar to the value-added tax paid in many other countries -- a tax on consumption rather than income.
NEWS
July 31, 2013
Regarding your recent editorial on the economy, the national debt may not have the importance attributed to it ( "Economic déjà vu," July 26). It may be just a device used by the GOP to cut social programs. The Republicans' solution to the debt is tax cuts for the wealthy, which they claim will generate jobs. That hasn't happened. President Obama has proposed revamping U.S. infrastructure as part of a massive jobs program. This hasn't happened either, largely because of Republican opposition.
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