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Tax Breaks

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Editorial from The Record and The Aegis | December 12, 2013
The recent announcement of the elimination of 191 jobs at the Saks retail distribution center in Aberdeen – which once employed about 600 people and went through an earlier round of cuts last year – is a reminder to some of us that the distribution center's location was chosen in part because of tax breaks offered to the corporate ownership. Saks closed a distribution center in New York and relocated to Aberdeen and one of the things that made the deal a bit sweeter for the corporation was $8.1 million in tax breaks offered by Harford County and the state.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
A City Council committee on Tuesday killed a bill to grant tax breaks to urban farmers after the mayor's office said it would set a bad precedent. The opposition by the administration of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake outraged Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke, a sponsor of the measure. "I know we give tax breaks to well-to-do developers," Clarke said, her voice rising, after learning that the city's finance department had urged her colleagues to vote against the bill. Urban farmers, she said, "aren't wealthy.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
The Democratic Governors Association has put $750,000 into an advertising campaign questioning Republican nominee Larry Hogan's commitment to education. The national group works to elect Democrats, but the ad released this past week never mentions the party's nominee in Maryland, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown. Instead, the advertisement focuses on Hogan's position that the state cannot afford an expanded prekindergarten program, which is the signature issue of Brown's campaign. "Around here, we need a governor who understands that education makes Maryland work for middle-class families, but instead of investing in our kids, Larry Hogan says that we should give corporations $300 million more a year in tax breaks," the ad says.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2010
The developers of a Remington shopping center, which is slated to include a Walmart and Lowe's home improvement store, could be eligible for substantial tax breaks because of a resolution hastily approved by the Baltimore City Council last year. The 25th Street Station project, planned for the site Anderson Automotive has occupied for half a century, is located in one of the city's two designated "focus areas," where businesses receive extensive property tax breaks and credits for hiring employees to stimulate growth in struggling communities.
NEWS
November 15, 2013
Your editorial absolutely missed the point concerning military retirees and taxes ( "No to tax breaks for military retirees," Nov. 12). It is larger than the military as well, so why not mention railroad retirees? This is simple math and I recommend you go to the VA website and pull down the by-state expenditures. You can compare macro veteran populations and payments. And when you do, you will see that states that exempt tax on retirement have significantly greater populations of veterans (like every Maryland neighbor)
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Developers are set to receive tax credits designed to spur the construction of new apartments and homes in Baltimore under legislation the City Council approved Monday. The tax credits, which received no opposition from the council, are part of a plan by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to keep families in Baltimore and attract new residents to the city. "We look at different trends in the market that help us to determine what credits might put the city in the best position to be competitive," said Kevin R. Harris, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2011
Eugene Schoene maxed out a credit card, drained his checking account and borrowed money from a relative. It was the only way, he says, to pay an unexpected property tax bill of gigantic proportions. His tab from the city Bureau of Treasury Management's Collections Division: $21,939. Schoene is part of a group of Baltimore homeowners who have recently gotten hefty property tax bills going back four years after revelations that they were improperly collecting "homestead" credits — a widespread problem highlighted in an investigation published Sunday by The Baltimore Sun. A 65-year-old schoolteacher, Schoene says he didn't know he was getting undeserved breaks on three rental homes in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
The Baltimore City Council gave preliminary approval Monday for two more years of tax breaks for developers rehabbing historic properties - despite concerns that the program is riddled with errors and amounts to a giveaway to developers who would rehab older buildings without it. The multimillion-dollar program is set to expire next month. While the city's budget director questioned the program and whether the city could afford it, developers and residents rallied around the tax credit as a way to revitalize areas from the waterfront to poorer neighborhoods and called for its extension.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2013
A top aide to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake received more than $14,000 in homestead property tax breaks on an East Baltimore rental property he owns, records show, even though only owner-occupied homes qualify for the subsidy under Maryland law. State officials recognized the issue several months ago, and in January the city sent a bill to Khalil Zaied, the mayor's deputy chief of operations, demanding repayment of more than $5,000 for the tax...
NEWS
August 17, 2014
The Sun believes that "exempting police retirement income from state tax would be a mistake" ( "Pension pandering," Aug. 12). Fair enough. But when I reached the fourth paragraph of your editorial I began to see red. The inference is that "we" provide for our police and firefighters "far more generously" than we do for almost any other occupation, even within government. How about the Congress of the United States, an amalgamation of career politicians firmly entrenched close to the public teat?
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
City Councilman William "Pete" Welch is calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation he plans to introduce Thursday, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for an urban farmer who grows and sells at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables in a year. Welch said he hopes the legislation will help eliminate the city's so-called food deserts in which some neighborhoods have no access to healthy food nearby.  "We have a disparity in access to fresh fruit and vegetables," Welch said.  Such legislation was last tried three years ago by City Council members Mary Pat Clarke and Warren Branch, but it was opposed by the mayor's office who argued it would set a bad precedent for an already cash-strapped city.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Developers are set to receive tax credits designed to spur the construction of new apartments and homes in Baltimore under legislation the City Council approved Monday. The tax credits, which received no opposition from the council, are part of a plan by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to keep families in Baltimore and attract new residents to the city. "We look at different trends in the market that help us to determine what credits might put the city in the best position to be competitive," said Kevin R. Harris, a spokesman for Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Property taxes for Baltimore homeowners will drop again under Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's plan to gradually lower the city's rate to bring it more in line with the rest of the state. The city's spending panel agreed Wednesday to lower the rate to $2.13 per $100 of assessed value — still double the levy of surrounding counties, but down 14 cents in the past two years. The reduction is part of the mayor's plan to knock 20 cents off the tax for homeowners by 2020. The tax break, approved without discussion by the Board of Estimates, will lower the property tax bill for an average home by $174.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
A Baltimore judge dismissed Friday a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" that alleged the city illegally terminated their exclusive rights to build on the property. Baltimore Circuit Judge Pamela J. White threw out the $50 million suit, saying the city properly ended its deal with Lexington Square Partners when its contract for the land expired. "The mayor is happy we can finally move forward with a key development project on the west side," said Kevin Harris, a spokesman for Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 1, 2014
Dear Mr. John "Big John" Paterakis: Congratulations on a life of success in bread. Your H&S Bakery Inc. cornered the market on fast-food hamburger rolls. Your company holdings include Automatic Rolls of North Carolina, Automatic Rolls of New England, Automatic Rolls of New Jersey and Bake Rite Rolls of Pennsylvania. You told reporter Luke Broadwater of The Baltimore Sun that H&S plans to open two new bakeries, in Philadelphia and Denver. "We now cover about 70 percent of all the McDonald's in the country," you said.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | October 2, 2014
Here's another thing: The attack ad on Larry Hogan that claims Anthony Brown's Republican challenger for governor wants to give a $300 million tax break to corporations at the expense of kindergartners - that's another stretch into the shady side by the Democrats, and for a couple of reasons. First of all, Hogan hasn't said any such thing yet, although, being a mainstream Republican businessman, he says he would cut Maryland's corporate tax rate, and we all know the story there: You can't be a Republican without saying you want to cut taxes.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The breakdown in Annapolis over boosting incentives for films and television series shot in Maryland has left the state without enough money to give Netflix's "House of Cards" what it was seeking to produce its next season here, officials acknowledged Tuesday. House and Senate members failed Monday night to reach agreement on legislation that would have provided $3.5 million in additional tax credits for the coming year - money intended to cover the gap between what "House of Cards" is seeking and what the state will be able to spend.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
The breakdown in Annapolis over boosting incentives for films and television series shot in Maryland has left the state without enough money to give Netflix's "House of Cards" what it was seeking to produce its next season here, officials acknowledged Tuesday. House and Senate members failed Monday night to reach agreement on legislation that would have provided $3.5 million in additional tax credits for the coming year - money intended to cover the gap between what "House of Cards" is seeking and what the state will be able to spend.
BUSINESS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration on Monday introduced a bill to make 10 years of tax credits available citywide for developers of apartments. The bill would expand an existing 15-year tax credit program for apartments that's in place for eight targeted areas of the city. The 15-year credits will still apply for those areas, while the rest of the city will be eligible for the 10-year credits, the mayor's office said. Colin Tarbert, deputy director of the mayor's Office of Economic and Neighborhood Development, said the first year of the targeted program generated about $150 million in investment in Baltimore.
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